Jihad Al-Khalidi named CEO of Saudi Arabia’s Music Commission

Jihad Al-Khalidi. (SPA)
Short Url
Updated 25 February 2020

Jihad Al-Khalidi named CEO of Saudi Arabia’s Music Commission

  • We will not waste time living in the past, says Saudi musician

RIYADH: Minister of Culture Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan appointed Saudi musician Jihad Al-Khalidi as CEO of the Music Commission to launch its work developing the Saudi music sector.

Al-Khalidi has more than 33 years’ experience in the field of music and was a violinist for the Egyptian Orchestra for eight years. She has a bachelor’s degree in violin playing and music theory from the Higher Institute of Music in Cairo, along with her experience and administrative knowledge.
She said that it was hard to describe her feelings, but that she was really grateful for the confidence of the Saudi minister.
She said it was a dream come true, taking on the challenge to build a new era for music in Saudi Arabia.
She told Arab News that the position is considered a fundamental cornerstone for music teaching in the country, noting that everyone agrees on the importance of the education in the first years of schooling, side by side with musical performance.
Al-Khalidi said the current musical vision is oriented toward building a musical basis for all segments of society.
“We have established music programs for children from birth to 6 years of age, children between 6 and 17 years of age, university students, music lovers and people with special needs,” said Al-Khalidi.
“What is gone is gone. We will not waste time living in the past. We are building the future of music in Saudi Arabia and developing its infrastructure, which will require combining and intensifying efforts.”
Al-Khalidi said Saudis are lucky to live in this era of support, development and advancement on all levels. “We will pick up where others left off and learn more about the means advanced countries use to overcome  obstacles,” she added.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Jihad Al-Khalidi has more than 33 years’ experience in the field of music and was a violinist for the Egyptian Orchestra for eight years.

• She has a bachelor’s degree in violin playing and music theory from the Higher Institute of Music in Cairo, along with her experience and administrative knowledge.

She said that the aim is to develop a different pattern, in conformity with Saudi and Arab customs, traditions and heritage, and in line with the visions, capacities and ambitions of Saudi society to build a musical culture in the country.
Regarding musical schools in Saudi Arabia, Al-Khalidi said one of the key steps in the next phase is to restore traditional folk music in all Saudi regions and revive the musical heritage with a touch of modernity.
“Learning music is not an easy thing. Music in Saudi Arabia will be available to everyone despite the obstacles that we will overcome with time and with the help of the media, musicians and intellectuals,” she said.
The Ministry of Culture is seeking to develop the music sector in the Kingdom and to support and encourage practitioners through the Music Commission.
It will also work with the relevant authorities to support the protection of intellectual property rights in areas related to music, in addition to holding training courses, adopting relevant professional programs and encouraging practitioners to produce and develop musical content.
The Music Commission is one of 11 new bodies launched by the Ministry of Culture to oversee cultural sectors such as films, music, fashion, heritage and arts.


It was Russia, not Saudi Arabia, that pulled out of OPEC+ deal: Saudi ministers

Updated 04 April 2020

It was Russia, not Saudi Arabia, that pulled out of OPEC+ deal: Saudi ministers

  • Saudi foreign and energy ministers say Moscow's claim that Kingdom withdrew from the OPEC+ deal was unfounded
  • They said it was Russia that abandoned the agreement, leading to a collapse in world oil prices

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia's foreign and energy ministers on Saturday denied Russia's claim that the Kingdom abandoned the OPEC+ deal, leading to a collapse in world oil prices.

In a statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency (SPA), Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan said "a statement attributed to one of the media of President Vladimir Putin of the Russian Federation claimed that one of the reasons for the decline in oil prices was the Kingdom's withdrawal from the deal of OPEC + and that the Kingdom was planning to get rid of shale oil producers."

"The minister affirmed that what was mentioned is fully devoid of truth and that the withdrawal of the Kingdom from the agreement is not correct," the statement said.

In fact Saudi Arabia and 22 other countries tried to persuade Russia to make further cuts and extend the deal, but Russia did not agree, it said.

Prince Farhan expressed surprise that Russia had to resort to "falsifying facts" when Saudi Arabia's stance on shale oil production is known, the statement said.

He pointed out that Saudi Arabia is one of the main investors in the energy sector in United States, implying that there is no reason for the Kingdom "to get rid of shale oil producers" as Russia has claimed.

He further said the Kingdom "is also seeking to reach more cuts and achieve oil market equilibrium for the interest of shale oil producers."

OPEC+ refers to the cooperation between members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and non-OPEC oil producers. The cooperation deal which called for cuts in production by the producers was meant to stabilize oil prices. 

In a separate statement, Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman rejected Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak’s similar claim that the Kingdom refused to extend the OPEC+ deal and withdrew from it.

Novak "was the first to declare to the media that all the participating countries are absolved of their commitments starting from the first of April," Prince Abdulaziz said in a statement.

He said Novak's statement led other countries to decide "to raise their production to offset the lower prices and compensate for their loss of returns." 

On Thursday, Saudi Arabia called for an urgent meeting of oil exporters after US President Donald Trump said he expected the Kingdom and Russia to cut production by 10-15 million barrels per day.

Prince Farhan said he was "hoping that Russia would take the right decisions in the urgent meeting" so that a "fair agreement that restores the desired balance of oil markets" could be achieved.

The global oil market has crashed, with prices falling to $34 a barrel from $65 at the beginning of the year, as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Fuel demand has dropped by roughly a third, or 30 million barrels per day, as billions of people worldwide restrict their movements.

A global deal to reduce production by as much as 10 million to 15 million barrels per day would require participation from nations that do not exert state control over output, including the United States, now the world’s largest producer of crude.

A meeting of OPEC and allies such as Russia has been scheduled for April 6, but details were thin on the exact distribution of production cuts. No time has yet been set for the meeting, OPEC sources said.