More than 60,000 coronavirus patients recovered globally

More than 60,000 coronavirus patients recovered globally
While the spread of the virus has raised concerns, so too has the myths and misinformation about the disease, prompting the World Health Organization to refer to it as an “infodemic.” (File/AFP)
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Updated 10 March 2020

More than 60,000 coronavirus patients recovered globally

More than 60,000 coronavirus patients recovered globally
  • More than 63,600 have recovered from the illness out of 113,739
  • The WHO stressed that the mortality rate remains relatively low

As panic spreads over the growing toll of coronavirus infections globally, reassurance can be found in the high number of recovery rates.
More than 63,600 have recovered from the illness out of 113,739 since it was first announced in late December – that is more than half the number of infected to date.
So far 115 countries have reported infections, with the vast majority in China at more than 80,750 followed by Italy with in excess of 9,170. But countries are also reporting recovery rates daily.
The UAE’s Ministry of Health and Prevention on Monday announced the recovery of five patients of the Covid-19 coronavirus. This brought the total number of recovered patients in the UAE to 12.

The WHO stressed that the mortality rate remains relatively low:  “This is a very serious outbreak and it has the potential to grow, but we need to balance that in terms of the number of people infected. Outside Hubei this epidemic is affecting a very, very tiny, tiny proportion of people”, said Michael Ryan, head of WHO’s health emergencies program.
In China there were 3,136 recorded deaths when this story was written, but 59,943 recoveries.
While the spread of the virus has raised concerns, so too has the myths and misinformation about the disease, prompting the World Health Organization to refer to it as an “infodemic.”
Although experts don't yet have a clear picture of how deadly COVID-19 is when compared with other viruses, research suggests the global mortality rate for COVID-19 currently is around 3.4% - which makes the virus a more severe illness than the flu, but doesn't spread as efficiently.


Afghan government, Taliban announce breakthrough deal to press on with peace talks

Updated 30 min 50 sec ago

Afghan government, Taliban announce breakthrough deal to press on with peace talks

Afghan government, Taliban announce breakthrough deal to press on with peace talks
  • The agreement lays out the way forward for further discussion
  • Taliban insurgents have refused to agree to a cease-fire during the preliminary stages of talks

KABUL: Afghan government and Taliban representatives said on Wednesday they had reached a preliminary deal to press on with peace talks, their first written agreement in 19 years of war.
The agreement lays out the way forward for further discussion but is considered a breakthrough because it will allow negotiators to move on to more substantive issues, including talks on a cease-fire.
“The procedure including its preamble of the negotiation has been finalized and from now on, the negotiation will begin on the agenda,” Nader Nadery, a member of the Afghan government’s negotiating team, told Reuters.
The Taliban spokesman confirmed the same on Twitter.
The agreement comes after months of discussions in Doha, the capital of Qatar, in negotiations encouraged by the United States. In Afghanistan, the two sides are still at war, with Taliban attacks on government forces continuing unabated.
Taliban insurgents have refused to agree to a cease-fire during the preliminary stages of talks, despite calls from Western capitals and global bodies, saying that that would be taken up only when the way forward for talks was agreed upon.
UN envoy for Afghanistan Deborah Lyons welcomed the “positive development” on Twitter, adding that “this breakthrough should be a springboard to reach the peace wanted by all Afghans.”
Last month, an agreement reached between Taliban and government negotiators was held up at the last minute after the insurgents balked at the document’s preamble because it mentioned the Afghan government by name.
The Taliban refused to refer to the Afghan negotiating team as representatives of the Afghan government, as they contest the legitimacy of the administration led by President Ashraf Ghani.