Death toll at 21 as Egypt storms, flooding enter second day

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Vehicles drive along a flooded portion of the ring-road highway that encircles the Egyptian capital Cairo and it's twin city of Giza, in Giza on Mar. 12, 2020, amdist a heavy rain storm. (AFP)
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A man rides a cart during a thunderstorm and heavy rains in Cairo, as the government announced a day off while the rain exceeds the infrastructure's capacity in most cities, Egypt Mar. 12, 2020. (Reuters)
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A man tries to fix an auto rickshaw during a thunderstorm and heavy rains in downtown of Cairo, as the government announced a day off while the rain exceeds the infrastructure's capacity in most cities, in Egypt Mar. 12, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 13 March 2020

Death toll at 21 as Egypt storms, flooding enter second day

  • Most of the fatalities took place in the country's rural areas and run-down slums
  • At least six children died, either from electrocution or rubble after heavy rains knocked down their houses

CAIRO: Thunderstorms and flooding around Egypt entered a second day Friday, interrupting daily life in much of the country, including the capital Cairo, as the death toll rose to 21, authorities said.
Most of the fatalities took place in the country's rural areas and run-down slums. At least six children died, either from electrocution or rubble after heavy rains knocked down their houses.
Since the rains hit late Wednesday and early Thursday, social media has been inundated with images and video showing flooded roads and villages as well as water-filled apartments in some of Cairo's richest neighborhoods.




A man rides a cart during a thunderstorm and heavy rains in Cairo, as the government announced a day off while the rain exceeds the infrastructure's capacity in most cities, Egypt Mar. 12, 2020. (Reuters)


Chaos always accompanies bad weather in Egypt, raising questions about the country’s poor infrastructure and dilapidated sewage and drainage systems. To minimize the impact of bad weather, the government closed down schools and suspended work in businesses and government offices after forecasters warned of heavy rains and flooding across much of the country through Saturday.




A man tries to fix an auto rickshaw during a thunderstorm and heavy rains in downtown of Cairo, as the government announced a day off while the rain exceeds the infrastructure's capacity in most cities, in Egypt Mar. 12, 2020. (Reuters)


Late on Thursday, Cairo’s Water Authority announced it had suspended water service to the entire megacity because heavy rain had overwhelmed the vast sewage system. Water would return when the weather improved, it said, without offering an exact time. By Friday morning water had returned to some parts of the city.
The floods forced the country's railway authorities to suspend train service nationwide. Power outages were also reported in several parts of the country, including parts of Cairo.


Kuwait expects nearly 1.5 million expats to leave by end of year

Updated 11 July 2020

Kuwait expects nearly 1.5 million expats to leave by end of year

  • Over 158,000 expat workers have already left the country
  • The Egyptian and Indian expats communities were hit the hardest

DUBAI: Almost 1.5 million expatriate workers are expected to leave Kuwait by year’s end as economic slowdown due to the coronavirus pandemic forced companies to cut their workforce to save on costs and remain afloat.
Likewise, the government’s decision to lower the number of expats living in the country, through a new residency law, and its continuing Kuwaitization of jobs in the public sector also hit migrant workers.
Over 158,000 expat workers have already left the country only in a span of 116 days, or from March 16 until July 9, many of whom have been laid off because of the coronavirus crisis, local newspaper Arab Times reported.
The Egyptian and Indian expats communities were hit the hardest, the report said.
The draft of Kuwait’s new residency law would limit the number of foreign nationals recruited by companies each year and will include regulations based on their skills, Interior Minister Anas Al-Saleh was earlier reported as saying.
The Kuwait parliament aims to have the legislation ready by October, prior to the November elections.