Abu Dhabi’s Etihad will survive coronavirus crisis, says CEO

Etihad Airways Airbus A340-600 plane is seen parked at Abu Dhabi International Airport in the UAE. (File/Reuters)
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Updated 20 March 2020

Abu Dhabi’s Etihad will survive coronavirus crisis, says CEO

  • Etihad has canceled dozens of flights and asked some staff to bring forward paid leave as it tackles the crisis

DUBAI: Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Airways will survive the coronavirus epidemic, it’s chief executive said in a video released on Friday, a day after the industry’s largest body warned that Middle East airlines were in crisis.
The International Air Transport Association (IATA) on Thursday said Middle East airlines are facing a liquidity crisis and hundreds of thousands of jobs across the region were at risk and urged for state intervention.
“We want to reassure ... (that) afterwards when we all want to get back to our normal lives, we want to travel, Etihad will still be there to make sure it’s the best possible way that you can enjoy that experience,” Tony Douglas said in the video posted on the airline’s Twitter account.

Etihad has canceled dozens of flights and asked some staff to bring forward paid leave as it tackles the crisis that has shattered global travel demand.
“These are unprecedented times,” Douglas said in the video, in which he also described the situation as difficult.
The state-owned carrier this month reported an $870 million loss for 2019, its fourth consecutive annual loss.
Etihad, which has lost $5.6 billion since 2016, is now focused on point-to-point traffic.


Conflict-hit Libya to restart oil operations but with low output

Updated 10 July 2020

Conflict-hit Libya to restart oil operations but with low output

  • There is significant damage to the reservoirs and infrastructure
  • A first cargo of 650,000 barrels will be shipped by the Kriti Bastion Aframax tanker

TUNIS: Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) lifted force majeure on all oil exports on Friday as a first tanker loaded at Es Sider after a half-year blockade by eastern forces, but said technical problems caused by the shutdown would keep output low.
“The increase in production will take a long time due to the significant damage to reservoirs and infrastructure caused by the illegal blockade imposed on January 17,” NOC said in a statement.
A first cargo of 650,000 barrels will be shipped by the Kriti Bastion Aframax tanker, chartered by Vitol, which two sources at Es Sider port said had docked and started loading on Friday morning.
The blockade, which was imposed by forces in eastern Libya loyal to Khalifa Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA), has cost the country $6.5 billion in lost export revenue, NOC said.
“Our infrastructure has suffered lasting damage, and our focus now must be on maintenance and securing a budget for the work to be done,” NOC chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in the statement.
Control over Libya’s oil infrastructure, the richest prize for competing forces in the country, and access to revenues, has become an ever-more significant factor in the civil war.
The internationally recognized Government of National Accord, supported by Turkey, has recently pushed back the LNA, backed by the United Arab Emirates, Russia and Egypt, from the environs of Tripoli and pushed toward Sirte, near the main oil terminals.