Turkey bars firms from laying off workers amid pandemic

Turkey bars firms from laying off workers amid pandemic
Turkish police officers patrol a deserted Istiklal street at Taksim district in Istanbul on April 12,2020 after a curfew was imposed. (AFP)
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Updated 17 April 2020

Turkey bars firms from laying off workers amid pandemic

Turkey bars firms from laying off workers amid pandemic

DUBAI: No Turkish employers are allowed to lay off any worker during the coronavirus pandemic, declared Zehra Zümrüt Selçuk, the country’s labor, social services and family minister.

Likewise, employment contracts cannot be nullified for a three-month period except in unconscionable situations, Selçuk added.

Turkey will also pay 39.24 Turkish liras, or about $5.70, a day for three months to workers who were forced to take unpaid leaves due to the coronavirus outbreak, Zehra Zümrüt Selçuk said in a tweet.

Selçuk added that the ministry will bear expenses for elderly and disabled people at private nursing homes and care centers.

Several new steps to mitigate the pandemic’s impact on economic and social life were approved by the Turkish parliament early on April 16.


Swedish-Iranian scientist may face imminent execution, say rights groups

Updated 20 min 10 sec ago

Swedish-Iranian scientist may face imminent execution, say rights groups

Swedish-Iranian scientist may face imminent execution, say rights groups
  • Djalali was arrested in Iran in 2016 and later convicted of espionage
  • Iran's Supreme Court in 2017 upheld the death sentence

DUBAI: Swedish-Iranian scientist Ahmadreza Djalali, sentenced to death in Iran on espionage charges, may face imminent execution, rights groups said on Tuesday.
"On 1 December, a judge said Ahmadreza was to be transferred to Rajai Shahr prison TODAY to proceed with his imminent execution," Amnesty International said on Twitter.
"His lawyer was informed that Ahmadreza would be transferred to Rajai Shahr Prison ... today (Tuesday, Dec. 1)," Iran Human Rights said in a statement, quoting his wife Vida Mehrannia.
There was no official Iranian reaction to the reports.
Sweden's foreign minister said last week she had spoken to her Iranian counterpart after reports Iran may soon carry out Djalali's death sentence.
Djalali, a medical doctor and lecturer at the Karolinska Institute in the Swedish capital Stockholm, was arrested in Iran in 2016 and later convicted of espionage, having been accused of providing information to Israel to help it assassinate several senior nuclear scientists. Iran's Supreme Court in 2017 upheld the death sentence.
Rights activists have accused Iran of arresting a number of dual nationals to try to win concessions from other countries. Tehran has regularly dismissed the accusation. (Reporting by Dubai newsroom; Editing by Alex Richardson)