Samsung profit slips on coronavirus, more falls forecast

Samsung expects weaker results in the next three months, adding that “uncertainties driven by COVID-19 will persist” into the second half. (AP)
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Updated 29 April 2020

Samsung profit slips on coronavirus, more falls forecast

  • Net profits in the January-to-March period were $4 billion, down 3.1 percent from a year earlier

SEOUL: The world’s biggest smartphone maker, Samsung Electronics, said Wednesday that net profits in the first quarter were only slightly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic but warned of further falls to come as demand is “significantly” hit by the disease.
It reported on Wednesday that net profits fell slightly in the first quarter as the coronavirus pandemic dampened consumer demand, but warned of further falls to come.
Net profits in the January-to-March period were $4 billion, down 3.1 percent from a year earlier, the company said in a statement.
The January-March performance was “partially due to effects of COVID-19,” Samsung said in a statement.
And it said it expects weaker results in the next three months, adding that “uncertainties driven by COVID-19 will persist” into the second half.
The firm is the flagship subsidiary of the giant Samsung Group, by far the largest of the family-controlled conglomerates known as “chaebols” that dominate business in the world’s 12th-largest economy.
The figures come as the coronavirus pandemic wreaks havoc across the world economy — earlier this month Samsung had operations suspended at 11 overseas assembly lines — with expectations rife of a looming global recession.
In the second quarter, it warned: “Overall earnings are likely to decline from the previous quarter because COVID-19 will significantly impact demand for several of its core products.”
Memory demand “is expected to remain robust for servers and PCs as more people work from home,” it said.
But “sales and profits of set products business, including smartphones and TVs, are expected to decline significantly as COVID-19 affects demand and leads to store and plant closures globally.”
Woody Oh, a researcher at Strategy Analytics, said the first-quarter results showed only “a slight impact” from the virus outbreak, which emerged in China and spread to the US, Europe and India — Samsung’s key markets.
“But the real impact will show in the second quarter,” he said, adding almost all companies will report their worst results in April-June as the effects of the pandemic become clear.
Samsung had pinned its hopes for 2020 on a rollout of its new 5G and premium smartphones including its latest folding Galaxy Z flip phone.
“While a contraction of the global smartphone market is expected as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, demand for 5G smartphones is forecast to grow,” DJ Koh, president of Samsung’s mobile division told the firm’s shareholder meeting last month.
Global smartphone sales dropped 14 percent year-on-year in February, according to the latest data from market researcher Counterpoint Research, although Samsung’s sales remained stable as it has limited exposure to the heavily hit Chinese market.
A report by market researcher TrendForce this month showed Samsung’s chip business may take a hit in the second half from shipment disruptions caused by virus lockdowns.
“Some of Samsung’s back-end server DRAM packaging operations are based in Luzon, the Philippines. Therefore, the continued quarantine of Luzon may affect the shipment schedule of Samsung’s server DRAM modules,” it said.
Overall, the Taiwan-based market researcher said it expects the rebound of memory chip prices to be “flattened” as the coronavirus pandemic dampens demand from the latter half of the year.
Adding to Samsung Electronics’ challenges, its vice chairman and de facto leader Lee Jae-yong is currently being re-tried over a sprawling corruption scandal that could see him return to prison.
He is not being held in custody during the proceedings, but a guilty verdict could deprive the firm of its top decision-maker.


Dubai launches economic program for post COVID-19 recovery 

Updated 05 August 2020

Dubai launches economic program for post COVID-19 recovery 

  • “The Great Economic Reset Programme” is part of a “COVID Exit initiative” to help the recovery and reshaping of the economy
  • The economic program will feature analyses of current and future policies

DUBAI: Dubai launched an economic program as part of its efforts to reshape the emirate’s economy for a “sustainable” and “resilient” future post the coronavirus pandemic, the government said. 
The Dubai government partnered with the Mohammed bin Rashid School of Government (MBRSG) to launch “The Great Economic Reset Programme” as part of a “COVID Exit initiative” to help the recovery and reshaping of the economy, state news agency WAM reported on Tuesday. 
The economic program will feature analyses of current and future policies, research and extensive stakeholder consultation to set the direction and tone of future economic policies, regulations and initiatives.
The government plans to use local and international experts for economies and societies to create growth strategies for the Dubai economy.
The MBRSG held a “Virtual Policy Council,” with global experts and thought leaders to discuss the impacts of COVID-19 on the economy and potential policy responses and initiatives. 
Chief economists, senior practitioners and researchers from leading global institutions including the World Bank, joined experts from Dubai Economy and the MBRSG at the first roundtable.
“I believe the triple helix collaboration between public, private and academia stakeholders have always produced the best solutions in the past. In the highly uncertain environment now, extensive collaboration and cooperation between all stakeholders are vital to our future prosperity. The Virtual Policy Council will propose the best approaches Dubai and the UAE can adopt to address the risks and opportunities in the next normal economy,” said Mohammed Shael Al-Saadi, CEO of the Corporate Strategic Affairs sector in Dubai Economy.
“This Virtual Policy Council is a key component of the whole process where global experts and thinkers share their views on the future economy. In this new era, the role of governments in enabling the new economic actors is becoming increasingly central, and Dubai is well-positioned to lead the way with innovative models of growth post COVID19,” said Professor Raed Awamleh, Dean of MBRSG.
The roundtable also discussed the impact of the pandemic on international trade, foreign investment and tourism, as well as the rise of digital globalization.