UK urged to push for aid deliveries to northern Syria

At least 4 million people in northern Syria rely on aid brought through the country’s official border crossings. (File/AFP)
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Updated 02 May 2020

UK urged to push for aid deliveries to northern Syria

  • At least 4 million people in northern Syria rely on aid brought through the country’s official border crossings, according to the UN
  • The WHO recently said fewer than two-thirds of Syria’s hospitals were operational

LONDON: The UK government has been warned that “unimaginable” and “catastrophic” damage could be caused if cross-border aid is not delivered to people in northern Syria as coronavirus is set to sweep the region.
Labour’s spokesperson for international development, Anna McMorrin MP, urged Downing Street to apply pressure on the UN Security Council to guarantee the delivery of aid, after the council voted in December to close half the official entry points to Syria.
In a letter to UK Secretary of State for International Development Anne-Marie Trevelyan MP, McMorrin wrote: “The omission of UN Security Council support for the renewal of two crossings at Al-Yarubiyah and Al-Ramtha, bordering Iraq and Jordan respectively, in north east Syria is already significantly (hindering) the ability of the UN, partners and humanitarian agencies to continue to provide aid to populations in need.”
She added: “Currently the only way the international community can take action to prepare, prevent and respond to COVID-19 is through cross-border aid ... Global leaders cannot allow the incubation of the virus, which threatens the lives of the most vulnerable and may also jeopardize the health of citizens at home if a second wave stemming from low-income and fragile nations is the result of our inaction.”
At least 4 million people in northern Syria rely on aid brought through the country’s official border crossings, according to the UN.
The World Health Organization recently said fewer than two-thirds of Syria’s hospitals were operational, and around 70 percent of all Syrian medical staff had fled the country, due to the civil war that has ravaged it for the past nine years.
Social distancing for internally displaced Syrians living in camps is all but impossible, while testing for COVID-19 is a hugely challenging enterprise, according to the Red Cross.
Medical and personal protection equipment destined for the embattled north, meanwhile, is regularly held up by the Syrian regime.


Egypt condemns latest Houthi missile attack on Saudi Arabia

A ballistic missile is seen after it was fired toward the Saudi capital of Riyadh from an undisclosed location in Yemen, in this handout photo released December 19, 2017 by the Houthi movement's War Media. (REUTERS)
Updated 2 min 55 sec ago

Egypt condemns latest Houthi missile attack on Saudi Arabia

  • Foreign ministry expresses solidarity with Kingdom ‘as it faces assaults that target its civilians.’

CAIRO: The Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Monday strongly condemned an attack on Saudi Arabia by Yemeni Houthi militias.

That morning, the Saudi-led Arab coalition intercepted and destroyed four missiles and seven bomb-laden drones. According to a statement published by the Saudi Press Agency, the drones were launched from the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, at targets in the Kingdom.

The Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs expressed solidarity with Saudi Arabia “as it faces these assaults that target its civilians.” It also pledged its full support for any defensive measures authorities in the Kingdom take to ensure the country remains safe from terrorism.

The ministry reiterated Egypt’s full support for all efforts to restore peace and stability in Yemen. It said attacks such as the latest on Saudi Arabia will result in an escalation of instability, and called for a ceasefire so that the dispute can be resolved peacefully.

It stressed the importance of engaging in a political process to find a solution that respects the Gulf Cooperation Council and UN Security Council resolution 2216. This confirms Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi as Yemen’s internationally-recognized president and calls for the Houthis to return control the country’s capital, Sanaa, which was captured in 2014. The resolution also calls for the Houthis to stop using Yemen as a base from which to attack neighboring countries.

The Houthis took control of the nation in Sep. 2014. Saudi Arabia has been leading the Coalition for Supporting Legitimacy in Yemen since 2015. It includes a number of other Arab nations, including the UAE, Kuwait and Egypt.