UK, France, Germany ‘regret’ latest US move on Iran

Iranians shop for vegetables in the capital city of Tehran, on May 26, 2020. Iran on May 25, reopened major Shiite shrines across the Islamic republic, more than two months after they were closed, as it reported its lowest deaths from coronavirus since March. (AFP)
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Updated 31 May 2020

UK, France, Germany ‘regret’ latest US move on Iran

  • Iranian Atomic Energy Organization spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said Thursday Washington’s “desperate” decision was aimed at distracting attention from its “continued defeats at the hands of Iran”

LONDON: Britain, France and Germany on Saturday strongly condemned a US decision to end sanctions waivers for companies from nations that remain in a nuclear accord with Iran.
The waivers were part of the landmark agreement signed with Tehran in 2015 that sought to limit Iran’s nuclear ambitions in return for lifting crippling economic sanctions.
They allowed European, Chinese and Russian companies to work on the conversion of a heavy water reactor in Arak, a major industrial city in western Iran.
“We deeply regret the US decision to end the three waivers covering key JCPOA nuclear projects in Iran,” read a joint statement from the three European powers.
“These projects, endorsed by UN Security Council Resolution 2231, serve the non-proliferation interests of all and provide the international community with assurances of the exclusively peaceful and safe nature of Iranian nuclear activities.”
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the decision to end the waivers earlier this week.
The nuclear deal, known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), was signed by the US, Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia as well as Iran.

HIGHLIGHT

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the decision to end the waivers earlier this week.

However, the US pulled out in 2018 and the latest decision on waivers, following further sanctions, raises the prospect that the agreement could collapse.
Russia has also attacked the decision by Pompeo, with Moscow claiming US foreign policy was becoming “more dangerous and unpredictable.”
In Tehran, Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi condemned the US decision as a “flagrant violation of Resolution 2231 and the Charter of the United Nations.”
He said Iran was ready to “take legal action and act appropriately” if the move harms its nuclear rights, without elaborating.
Iranian Atomic Energy Organization spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said Thursday Washington’s “desperate” decision was aimed at distracting attention from its “continued defeats at the hands of Iran.”


Most licenses valid for Pakistan pilots working abroad: Regulator

Updated 7 min 34 sec ago

Most licenses valid for Pakistan pilots working abroad: Regulator

  • Airlines in 10 countries had demanded proof of valid flying licenses for their Pakistani pilots
  • In all, the foreign airlines asked for proof of 176 Pakistani pilot licenses

KARACHI: Pakistani authorities said Thursday they had confirmed the credentials of almost all Pakistani pilots working for foreign airlines, as the country battles a scandal over aviator licenses.
Airlines in 10 countries had demanded proof of valid flying licenses for their Pakistani pilots after it emerged about a third of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) aviators were holding “bogus or suspicious” licenses.
In all, the foreign airlines asked for proof of 176 Pakistani pilot licenses.
Of these, 166 “have been validated as genuine and certified by the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) Pakistan as having no anomaly,” the agency said in a statement.
The “process for the remaining 10 shall be concluded by next week,” it added.
Pakistan’s aviation minister sent shockwaves through the industry last month by revealing that some 260 pilots had dubious licenses.
About 150 worked for state-owned PIA — almost one-third of the airline’s staff of 434 pilots.
The announcement came a month after a PIA plane crashed into houses in Karachi, killing 98 people.
Investigators have largely blamed the crash on the pilots, though both had valid licenses.
The 10 airlines asking for proof of valid Pakistani pilots’ licenses were from Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Turkey, Malaysia, Vietnam and Hong Kong, according to the CAA.

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