Model Kendall Jenner responds to Photoshop accusations

Model Kendall Jenner responds to Photoshop accusations
Kendall Jenner took to Twitter to denounce her involvement with a photoshopped Black Lives Matter image. (File/AFP)
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Updated 08 June 2020

Model Kendall Jenner responds to Photoshop accusations

Model Kendall Jenner responds to Photoshop accusations

DUBAI: Earlier this week, an image of US model Kendall Jenner wearing a face mask and holding up a Photoshopped Black Lives Matter protest sign began circulating online. 

Critics were quick to point out that Jenner wasn’t actually holding a sign, as it was not visible in the shadow behind her on the ground. People were quick to accuse Jenner of being dishonest and suggested that the model Photoshopped it herself as protests continue around the world in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. 

This week, the half-sister of Kim Kardashian West decided to take to social media to set the record straight and confirm that she has nothing to do with the image.

“This is photoshopped by someone. I DID NOT post this,” wrote the 24-year-old model on Twitter.

Many fans came  to the reality star’s defense and even managed to uncover the original photo, which shows her without a face mask and holding a water bottle, not a sign, in the air.

While it is uncertain as to whether or not Jenner has attended any of the protests in her hometown of Los Angeles thus far, the model has shown solidarity for the movement and explained that she is working on becoming a better ally.

“To everyone reading this and to myself: keep researching, reading and educating yourself on how we can become better allies,” wrote Jenner on Instagram alongside a series of images relating to the civil rights movement. 



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to everyone reading this and to myself: keep researching, reading, and educating yourself on how we can become better allies. I’ve been doing a lot of thinking these past few days and my heart has been so heavy. I’m angry and hurt just like so many. I will never personally understand the fear and pain that the black community go through on a daily basis, but i know that nobody should have to live in constant fear. I acknowledge my white privilege and promise I will continue to educate myself on how I can help. raging on platforms can not be all that we do in order to repair the system, we need to take real action, off of social media. this is a time to have those uncomfortable conversations with people and mainly with ourselves. we must also make sure we are ready to vote when the time comes to elect the right people into office. the one truth that will always ring loudest is that BLACK LIVES MATTER. rest peacefully George Floyd and all victims of this horrible injustice

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“I will never personally understand the fear and pain that the black community go through on a daily basis, but I know that nobody should have to live in constant fear. I acknowledge my white privilege and promise I will continue to educate myself on how I can help.”

The caption concluded with a heartfelt dedication to George Floyd, whose death at the hands of Minneapolis police ignited the worldwide protests. “Rest peacefully George Floyd and all victims of this horrible injustice.”

The model’s statement came shortly after several online slammed Jenner for keeping silent years after her controversial protest-themed 2017 Pepsi advert.

In Pepsi's "Jump In" commercial starring Jenner, the model throws off her blond wig before joining a crowd of demonstrators. But rather than protesting, she takes a Pepsi can and hands it to a police officer as a peace offering, while the crowd cheers behind her. The ad was widely denounced and almost immediately pulled from TV.

Pepsi regretted the commercial and apologized for “putting Kendall Jenner in this position.”

Now, some marchers are using the ongoing protests as an opportunity to further roast Jenner’s revoked Pepsi commercial. 

At a June 2 demonstration in Los Angeles, comedian Everett Byram re-enacted the catwalk star’s widely mocked commercial by approaching an LAPD officer while holding out a can of soda.


Review: ‘Outside the Wire’ stays inside the box

Anthony Mackie cements his leading man status in an uncomplicated Netflix sci-fi thriller. Supplied
Anthony Mackie cements his leading man status in an uncomplicated Netflix sci-fi thriller. Supplied
Updated 17 January 2021

Review: ‘Outside the Wire’ stays inside the box

Anthony Mackie cements his leading man status in an uncomplicated Netflix sci-fi thriller. Supplied

LONDON: Seemingly overnight, Anthony Mackie has gone from supporting player in the sprawling Marvel universe to one of Netflix’s most bankable action leads, appearing in such diverse shows as Charlie Brooker’s “Black Mirror,”  season two of “Altered Carbon” and the ambitious 2019 sci-fi epic “IO.”

Leading man status is hardly a surprise since Mackie has proven himself capable of dramatic heft in films such as “The Hurt Locker” and sardonic camaraderie when playing Sam Wilson, Captain America’s friend and sidekick.

But it makes it all the more disappointing when a film doesn’t give him enough to do. In “Outside the Wire” Mackie plays Leo, an android super soldier embedded in a European war zone who recruits a naive drone pilot to help him prevent nuclear armageddon.

In what could have been a fascinatingly paradoxical (maybe even cerebral) spin on the genre, Leo is a weapon with an anti-war stance. He is designed to win hearts and minds, but is capable of shockingly efficient bouts of violence. And, in another potentially fascinating narrative move, he is partnered with rookie soldier Thomas Harp (British actor Damson Idris), who has never seen conflict up close.

These ingredients could make for an altogether different take on the standard military action thriller, but Swedish director Mikael Hafstrom opts for the safe, spectacular path instead. All of which is done very well, though a little long.

“Outside the Wire” is nicely paced, well choreographed and avoids any narrative lulls by knowing precisely when to ramp up the action. Mackie packs a (literal) punch when called for, but is never given much more to do than scowl and kick terrorists through walls.

The movie is perfect middle-of-the-road sci-fi — it asks a few interesting questions, but never really troubles itself trying to come up with the answers.