Europeans should ditch JCPOA in light of German intelligence report: Experts

Europeans should ditch JCPOA in light of German intelligence report: Experts
A new report disclosed that Tehran had tried to secure illicit goods and information for its nascent nuclear program. (AFP)
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Updated 14 July 2020

Europeans should ditch JCPOA in light of German intelligence report: Experts

Europeans should ditch JCPOA in light of German intelligence report: Experts
  • Iran was actively seeking nuclear capabilities throughout last year, according to BfV

LONDON: German intelligence has confirmed that Iran was actively seeking nuclear capabilities throughout 2019.
Experts believe this shows it is time for European countries to send a clear message to Tehran by finally abandoning the long-broken Iran nuclear deal.
A new report by the German domestic intelligence service BfV disclosed that Tehran had tried to secure illicit goods and information for its nascent nuclear program throughout 2019, in violation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which restricted Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief.
The BfV said it was “able to find occasional indications of Iranian proliferation-related procurement attempts for its nuclear program” in 2019.
Dr. Majid Rafizadeh, board member for the Harvard International Relations Council, told Arab News that the EU signatories of the JCPOA — Germany, the UK and France — have long been “conspicuously ignoring credible intelligence reports and disregarding Tehran’s nuclear activities.”
He added: “The announcement by German intelligence shows that Iran has demonstrated its interest in, and pursuit of, nuclear weapons.”
Reports from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) found traces of uranium at nuclear facilities in Iran, Rafizadeh said, confirming “that Iran was most likely violating the JCPOA since day one.”
Despite Tehran’s attempts to procure nuclear weaponry and a number of serious incidents — including tanker seizures by Iran, an uptick in missile attacks by Iranian proxies, and the activation of dispute mechanisms within the JCPOA — the European nations have remained resolute in their commitment to the deal.
The German revelations beg the question: How can Paris, Berlin and London continue to support the deal while Tehran flagrantly ignores it?
Ali Safavi, president of Near East Policy and a member of the National Council of Resistance of Iran, said European nations have been misled by Tehran.
“This infatuation with the JCPOA derives from a misguided perception that by offering concessions, whether political or economic, the behavior of the regime would change. The exact opposite has happened,” he told Arab News.
Instead of changing, he said, Tehran “took the windfall from the JCPOA and cashed it at the bank. No amount of economic and political concession will result in any improvement in the situation of human rights in Iran.” Nor will it “incentivize Tehran to halt its malign activities in the region,” he added.
European nations have held out hope that Tehran could be trusted and that economic incentives would be enough to bring the rogue state back into the fold.
It is now time for a change of tact, said Dr. Shervan Fashandi, an Iranian-Canadian political analyst and board member for Iranian Americans for Liberty.
“We need to acknowledge that the deal is dead in all but name. The European powers insist on staying committed to a deal that has failed in achieving all its objectives,” he told Arab News.
“The sooner the Europeans face the reality of the failed deal and start pressuring the Islamic Republic to fundamentally change course, the higher the chance of achieving stability in the Middle East.”
He said Iran used the cash injection of the JCPOA’s sanctions relief to spread chaos across the region, sending funds and missiles to proxies in Lebanon, Yemen, Afghanistan and elsewhere. Tehran violated both “the terms and the spirit” of the JCPOA, he added.
This was possible, in part, because of European appeasement of Iran. Ceasing this course of action could be instrumental in ending Iran’s destabilizing behavior in the region, Fashandi said.
“The European trio officially abandoning the failed nuclear deal can send a strong and clear signal to the regime in Iran that time is up,” he added.
It would tell Tehran that “it needs to either fundamentally correct its behavior and act like a responsible member of the international community, or turn into a pariah state even further,” he said.
The JCPOA was agreed in 2015 between Iran, the US, China, Russia, Germany, France and the UK.
It provided Iran with sanctions relief in exchange for the curtailing of its nuclear program, and guaranteed international agencies access to nuclear sites in the country to verify their accordance with the deal.
But Iran has repeatedly denied IAEA inspectors access to certain nuclear sites, in violation of the terms of the JCPOA.
 


Egypt delegation in Tel Aviv for cease-fire talks

Egypt delegation in Tel Aviv for cease-fire talks
Updated 33 sec ago

Egypt delegation in Tel Aviv for cease-fire talks

Egypt delegation in Tel Aviv for cease-fire talks
  • An Egyptian delegation is negotiating a cease-fire with Israeli and Hamas officials
  • Egypt has played a mediating role in the past between the sides

CAIRO: An Egyptian delegation is in Tel Aviv for talks with Israeli officials as part of efforts to negotiate a cease-fire in the escalating conflict with Gaza, Egyptian intelligence officials said Thursday.
The two officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not allowed to brief the media. The same delegation met with Hamas officials in the Gaza Strip first, they said, and crossed into Israel by land. Egypt has played a mediating role in the past between the sides.
Late Wednesday, Egypt’s foreign minister, Sameh Shukry, condemned Israeli attacks on Palestinian territory in a phone call with his Israeli counterpart, Gabi Ashkenazi. He said it was important for both sides to avoid escalation and resorting to military means, according to a readout of the call.


Oman to end COVID-19 curfew for individuals and vehicles

Oman to end COVID-19 curfew for individuals and vehicles
Updated 20 min 55 sec ago

Oman to end COVID-19 curfew for individuals and vehicles

Oman to end COVID-19 curfew for individuals and vehicles

DUBAI: Individuals and vehicles will no longer be subject to curfews starting on Saturday, after Oman’s COVID-19 Supreme Committee issued on Thursday a list of changes in restrictions.

The Committee also issued a ban on hosting any commercial activities inside stores between 8pm and 4am daily limiting the service to delivery. Groceries and supermarkets are exempt.

Moreover, the Supreme Committee maintained that within the hours of operation, stores, outlets, malls, restaurants and cafes will be permitted to accommodate up to 50 percent only.

The Committee also re-activated its decision to have only half of public sector employees reporting to work meanwhile the remaining will work remotely.


Israeli troops mass at Gaza border amid rocket fire, air strikes and clashes in Israel

Israeli troops mass at Gaza border amid rocket fire, air strikes and clashes in Israel
Updated 13 May 2021

Israeli troops mass at Gaza border amid rocket fire, air strikes and clashes in Israel

Israeli troops mass at Gaza border amid rocket fire, air strikes and clashes in Israel
  • At least 83 people have been killed in Gaza since violence escalated on Monday
  • Seven people have been killed in Israel, its military said

GAZA/JERUSALEM: Israeli troops massed at Gaza’s border on Thursday and Palestinian militants pounded Israel with rockets in intense hostilities that have caused international concern and touched off clashes between Jews and Arabs in Israel.
Days of violence between Jewish Israelis and the country’s Arab minority worsened overnight, with synagogues attacked and fighting breaking out on the streets of some communities.
With concern growing that the violence that flared on Monday could spiral out of control, the United States is sending an envoy, Hady Amr, to the region. But efforts to end the worst hostilities in years appear so far to have made no progress.
In renewed air strikes on Gaza, Israel struck a six-story residential building in Gaza City that it said belonged to Hamas, the Islamist group that controls the Palestinian enclave.
At least 83 people have been killed in Gaza since violence escalated on Monday, medics said, further straining hospitals already under heavy pressure during the COVID-19 pandemic.
“We are facing Israel and Covid-19. We are in between two enemies,” said Asad Karam, 20, a construction worker, standing beside a road damaged during the air strikes. An electricity pole had collapsed by the road, its wires severed.
In the latest Palestinian rocket attacks, one rocket crashed into a building near Israel’s commercial capital of Tel Aviv, injuring five Israelis, police said. Sirens blared in cities across southern Israel, sending thousands running for shelters.
Seven people have been killed in Israel, its military said.
“All of Israel is under attack. It’s a very scary situation to be in,” said Margo Aronovic, a 26-year-old student, in Tel Aviv.
Israel has prepared combat troops along the Gaza border and was in “various stages of preparing ground operations,” a military spokesman said, a move that would recall similar incursions during Israel-Gaza wars in 2014 and 2008-2009.
Health authorities in Gaza said they were investigating the deaths of several people overnight who they said may have inhaled poisonous gas. Samples were being examined and they had yet to draw any final conclusions, they said.
US President Joe Biden said he hoped fighting “will be closing down sooner than later.” A British minister urged Israel and Hamas to “take a step back” from the escalation.
’Open-ended’ Confrontation
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has vowed to “continue acting to strike at the military capabilities of Hamas” and other Gaza groups. Hamas is regarded as a terrorist group by the United States and Israel.
On Wednesday, Israeli forces killed a senior Hamas commander and bombed several buildings, including high-rises and a bank, which Israel said was linked to the faction’s activities.
Hamas signalled defiance, with its leader, Ismail Haniyeh, saying: “The confrontation with the enemy is open-ended.”
Israel launched its offensive after Hamas fired rockets at Jerusalem and Tel Aviv in retaliation for Israeli police clashes with Palestinians near Al-Aqsa mosque in East Jerusalem during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.
Turkey, whose hosting of Hamas leaders in Istanbul in recent years has contributed to a falling out with Israel, called on Muslim countries to show a united and clear stance over the Israel-Gaza violence.
In the fighting inside Israel, where some in the 21 percent Arab minority have mounted violent pro-Palestinian protests, attacks by Jews on Arabs passing by in ethnically mixed areas have worsened.
One person was in critical condition after being shot by Arabs in the Arab-Jewish town of Lod, where authorities imposed a curfew, police said.
Over 150 arrests were made overnight in Lod and Arab towns in northern Israel, police said.
Israeli President Reuven Rivlin called for an end to “this madness.”
“We are endangered by rockets that are being launched at our citizens and streets, and we are busying ourselves with a senseless civil war among ourselves,” said the president, whose role is largely ceremonial.
Flights canceled
A number of foreign carriers have canceled flights to Israel because of the unrest.
The fatalities in Israel include a soldier killed while patrolling the Gaza border and six civilians, including two children and an Indian worker, medical authorities said.
Gaza’s health ministry said 17 of the people killed in the enclave were children and seven were women. The Israeli military said some 400 of 1,600 rockets fired by Gaza factions had fallen short, potentially causing some Palestinian civilian casualties.
The conflict has led to the freezing of talks by Netanyahu’s opponents on forming a governing coalition to unseat him after Israel’s inconclusive March 23 election.
Although the latest problems in Jerusalem were the immediate trigger for hostilities, Palestinians are frustrated by setbacks to their aspirations for an independent state in recent years.
These include Washington’s recognition of disputed Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, a US plan to end the conflict that they saw as favorable to Israel and settlement building.


Yemen’s President says Houthis reacted with violence to peace efforts

Yemen’s President says Houthis reacted with violence to peace efforts
Updated 13 May 2021

Yemen’s President says Houthis reacted with violence to peace efforts

Yemen’s President says Houthis reacted with violence to peace efforts
  • The Yemeni President said the Houthis went on committing crimes and massacres against the civilians
  • The FM of the UK Raab called on the Houthis to meet with the UN Special Envoy to Yemen and end their blocking of peace

DUBAI: Yemen’s president said the government has reacted constructively to peace efforts, but said the Houthi militia responded with more violence, state news agency SabaNew reported.
“We have dealt constructively with all efforts and calls for peace by the UN and International Community, we frequently offered concessions in order to stop bloodshed and put an end to our peoples’ suffering after more than six years, but this terrorist militia responded with more escalation,” SabaNew quoted Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi’s address to the people on the occasion of Eid.
He said the Houthis “went on committing crimes and massacres against the civilians, firing ballistic missiles and drones on the cities, residential areas in our country and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a move [that] reflected the behavior of these militias of terrorism, malice, criminal tendency and acting to serve the Iranian intention to trigger wars and crises,” he said.
Meanwhile, the Foreign Minister of the United Kingdom Dominic Raab called on the Houthis to meet with the UN Special Envoy to Yemen and end their blocking of peace.
“We continue to witness harrowing stories of Yemeni children being forced into battle and women being kidnapped in Houthi territory. The UK calls on the Houthis to meet with @OSE_Yemen and end their Marib offensive & the blocking of peace,” he tweeted.


UN Security Council urges immediate cease-fire in Yemen

UN Security Council urges immediate cease-fire in Yemen
Updated 13 May 2021

UN Security Council urges immediate cease-fire in Yemen

UN Security Council urges immediate cease-fire in Yemen
  • Council singles out military escalation by Iranian-backed Shiite Houthi rebels in the oil-rich central province of Marib

UNITED NATIONS: The UN Security Council called for an immediate halt to fighting in Yemen on Wednesday, saying that only a lasting cease-fire and political settlement can end the six-year conflict in the Arab world’s poorest nation and the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.
In calling for a cessation of hostilities, the council singled out the military escalation by Iranian-backed Shiite Houthi rebels in the oil-rich central province of Marib, the internationally recognized government’s last stronghold in Yemen’s northern half. The offensive has put at risk an estimated 1 million civilians who have fled there since 2015 to escape fighting elsewhere.
The council’s press statement followed a briefing by UN special envoy Martin Griffiths, who said he couldn’t emphasize enough that the more than yearlong Houthi offensive “has caused an astonishing loss of life, including children who have been mercilessly thrown into the battle.”
Displaced people in Marib are living in fear for their lives, he said, “and the offensive has been until now constantly disrupting peace efforts.”
In 2014, the Houthis overran the capital, Sanaa, and much of Yemen’s north, driving the government of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi into exile. A US-backed, Saudi-led coalition intervened the following year against the Houthis seeking to restore Hadi’s rule.
The intensified fighting in Marib has come amid an international and regional diplomatic push to end the conflict.
“The longer the Marib offensive goes on, the greater the risk to Yemen’s broader stability and social cohesion,” Griffiths warned. “It may lead to the transfer of conflict to other areas in Yemen, including those which have remained mercifully far from the main theaters of conflict. Yemen is an unstable country, easily destabilized.”
Griffiths expressed fear the Marib offensive may suggest to some that the war can be won militarily, but he said military conquest will only fuel further cycles of violence and unrest. He said Yemen can only be governed effectively by an “inclusive partnership” of “different political forces and components.”
UN humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock told the council that about 25,000 people have fled the fighting in Marib, many for the second or third time. If the fighting doesn’t stop, he said, “aid agencies fear up to 385,000 people could be displaced in the coming months.”
Lowcock warned that “famine is still stalking the country, with five million people just a step away from starving,” and COVID-19 cases are still surging, “pushing the health care system to collapse.” Famine, disease and other miseries are the result of the war and that is why “it is so important to stop the fighting,” he said.
Since March 2020, Griffiths has been trying to get the Houthis and the government to commit to a nationwide cease-fire, to reopen Sanaa airport to commercial traffic, ensure an uninterrupted flow of fuel and commodities through the main port of Hodeida, and to resume a political process aimed at reaching a political settlement.
“I am here to say that a deal is still very much possible,” Griffiths told the council.
“There is strong international backing and there is regional momentum for the UN’s efforts,” he said, expressing gratitude to Oman, Saudi Arabia, the United States and others. They are working closely and “without any differences between us,” he said.
Griffiths said the differences between the parties in Yemen “are not unbridgeable” and “a deal can be achieved easily, very quickly,” if both sides agree.
But he told the council that on several occasions during negotiations, the Houthis refused to meet with him, including recently. “To say this sends a wrong signal is an understatement,” he said.
Security Council members expressed support for Griffiths “and expressed their expectation that the Houthis meet him soon.”
Shortly after the council meeting ended, Secretary-General Antonio Gutteres announced the appointment of Griffiths as the UN’s next humanitarian chief, replacing Lowcock. But Guterres said Griffiths will continue to serve as the UN’s top envoy for Yemen “until a transition has been announced.”
In the coming weeks, Griffiths said, all countries should push the parties, in particular the Houthis, to conclude negotiations so the fighting stops.
“And I would like to be able to resolve that before we meet again,” he said.