Man goes viral for trying to fill electric Tesla car with petrol

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Updated 17 July 2020

Man goes viral for trying to fill electric Tesla car with petrol

  • Tesla Model 3 owner was filmed attempting to fill his car with petrol by magician Justin Flom, who posted the funny footage to his Facebook page

LONDON: A man in Las Vegas has become an online celebrity for all the wrong reasons after being filmed trying to refuel an electric vehicle at a petrol station.

The Tesla Model 3 owner was filmed attempting to fill his car with petrol by magician Justin Flom, who posted the funny footage to his Facebook page.

In the video, which has amassed 20,000 interactions and more than 4,500 comments, Flom asks “Tesla, at a gas station?” as the driver gets out his car. 

 

 

Flom and his passengers are not initially sure if he is attempting to buy fuel, but soon begin laughing as the driver pays for petrol and attempts to put the fuel nozzle into his car.

Unable to fit it in, the bemused Tesla driver moves to the other side of the car to check and even opens the trunk and the bonnet of the car.

Visibly frustrated, the driver then begins searching on his phone for answers. Flom’s video captures the moment he realizes his mistake and expresses his annoyance.

Flom shared the footage on Wednesday with the caption: “He tried to put GAS in his TESLA.”

People commenting on the video wrote: “I think he bought Tesla while sleeping, I mean people generally knows the specifications of the car he is driving.” 

Another added: “Surprised the person who sold him the car didn't explain it doesn't need gas. Poor guy! Eventually he would have found out about it.”


TWITTER POLL: Almost 3 of 4 readers think there is more to the massive blast in Beirut

Updated 07 August 2020

TWITTER POLL: Almost 3 of 4 readers think there is more to the massive blast in Beirut

  • Impact of the blast was also reportedly felt 200 kilometers away in Cyprus
  • Mushroom clouds and spherical blast waves are conflated as nuclear in nature

DUBAI: Almost three of four readers think there is more to the massive explosions that hit a Beirut port on Tuesday, according to an Arab News straw poll on Twitter.

The blast, caused by a stockpile ammonium nitrate stored in a warehouse, generated a shock wave so devastating that it levelled buildings near the port and caused extensive damage over much of the rest of the capital, killing more than 100 people and injuring thousands.

The impact of the blast was also reportedly felt 200 kilometers away in Cyprus.

Specifically, 73 percent of more than 1,000 readers who responded to the poll do not believe the explosion was an accident compared to about 27 percent who thought it was back luck that the ammonium nitrate – unsafely stored for six years – has been the cause of the deadly Beirut blast.

The enormous explosion consequently created a mushroom cloud over Beirut, stoking fears and rumors on social media and, among conspiracy theorists, that a nuclear bomb has been detonated in the Lebanese capital due to the sheer magnitude of the blast.

About 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate was involved during Tuesday’s explosion. Ammonium nitrate is a crystal-like white solid commonly used as a source of nitrogen for agricultural fertilizer, and is relatively safe when stored properly. It, however, becomes deadly as an explosive when mixed with other chemicals and fuel oils.

Some experts pointed out that people who are not accustomed to seeing large explosions may confuse mushroom clouds and spherical blast waves as nuclear in nature.

Others believed the Beirut explosion lacked two hallmarks of a nuclear detonation: a ‘blinding white flash’ and a thermal pulse, or surge of heat, which would otherwise had started fires all over the area and severely burned people’s skin.