At Beirut’s ‘ground zero’, race to find survivors

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A rescue team surveys the site of this week's massive explosion in the port of Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. (AP)
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A dog of the French rescue team searches for survivors at the scene of this week's massive explosion in the port of Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. (AP)
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A rescue team watch diggers tackle the removal of debris from this week's massive explosion in the port of Beirut, Lebanon, Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. (AP)
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Updated 07 August 2020

At Beirut’s ‘ground zero’, race to find survivors

  • Rescuers worked shifts to try to find an entrance to a control room buried under meters (yards) of rubble
  • The death toll for the disaster stood at 154 on Friday but dozens of people were still reported missing

BEIRUT: Ankle-deep in corn spilling from a huge gutted silo, rescuers guide an excavator to clear access to a room where they believe Beirut port employees could still be alive.
Three days after the monster explosion that disfigured the city in a matter of seconds, the clock was already ticking down Friday on any potential survivors’ chances.
Rescuers from Lebanon, France, Germany, Russia and other countries worked shifts to try to find an entrance to a control room buried under meters (yards) of rubble.
Beirut’s “ground zero,” a term describing the point closest to a detonation that was first used for the 1945 atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, filled up with teams working together in a desperate push to find survivors.
“Let’s not kid ourselves, the chances are quite low,” said Lt. Andrea, a member of a 55-stong French contingent at the forefront of the rescue effort.
“But it’s been done before, three days later, four days later,” survivors have been found, he said, the charred silos behind him cutting a ghostly figure against Beirut’s ravaged skyline.
The death toll for the disaster, one of the worst of its kind in modern history, stood at 154 on Friday but dozens of people were still reported missing.
Andrea explained that the effort at the port was focused on the control room because a significant number of people would have been working there at the time of the explosion.
He said some smaller primary explosions in the port, however, might have led the staff to flee the room.
“The four bodies we uncovered in the search area... were found next to a safety exit staircase at the foot of the silos,” Andrea explained.
Thousands of tons of corn, wheat and barley scattered from the silos by the explosion carpeted the port car parks and quays.
An eerie calm filled the unrecognizable docks, usually bustling with traffic, workers and traders.
Rescuers stood silently above a gap in the ground as a sniffer dog paced around a forest of mangled containers thrown around the port like sugar cubes.
The cargo pouring out of them gave a sample of the goods that had just entered the country: French-language school books, luxury handbags, crates of imported beer.
Three Red Cross volunteers looked dazed as they walked around the site of the blast and stopped by the waterfront to stare at their devastated city.
“It looks so quiet, but bad quiet. Something in this city died and will not rise again,” said one of them, standing with his arms akimbo and his gaze lost in the destruction before him.
The only sounds were those of massive excavators smashing a path through the rubble, rotary saws cutting iron rods and jackhammers breaking blocks of concrete into smaller pieces.
Col. Tissier, leader of the French rescue team who briefed France’s President Emmanuel Macron during his visit on Thursday, has worked on many disaster sites.
“The specificity here is that the epicenter is just here, a few meters away from us, whereas usually with earthquakes it is several hundred meters below ground level,” he said.
“With quakes, things usually collapse in layers... here everything was just pulverised,” he said.
That means the growing fleet of heavy machinery converging on Beirut port Friday had to dig into solid mounds of rubble before reaching whatever is buried under it.
“When it comes to the actual center of the impact, it is quite reminiscent of September 11 ‘ground zero’,” Andrea said of the 2001 US attacks on the Twin Towers in New York.
“The extent of the destruction will also remind some members of our team of the earthquake in Haiti in 2010,” he said.
“The difference here is that it’s not an earthquake. Humans did this.”


Iran virus deaths surge past 24,000

Updated 20 September 2020

Iran virus deaths surge past 24,000

  • President Hassan Rouhani blamed people’s failure to observe preventive measures, especially wearing masks, for the surge in cases

JEDDAH: The official coronavirus death toll in Iran surged past 24,000 on Saturday as health chiefs admitted 90 percent of COVID-19 patients on ventilators in hospital were dying.

Payam Tabarsi, head of infectious diseases at Masih Daneshvari Hospital in Tehran, said the number of emergency room patients had jumped from 68 a day to 200 in the past week. “People are queuing to be admitted,” he said, and if the trend continued, deaths from coronavirus could reach 600 a day within weeks.

Iran’s total number of confirmed cases in the past 24 hours spiked by 2,845 to 419,043 and the death toll rose by 166 to 24,118, Health Ministry spokeswoman Sima Sadat Lari said.

Iran was slow to react to the first coronavirus cases in February, and is now battling the Middle East’s deadliest outbreak. Daily infections have remained above 2,000 for the past two weeks and are nearing the 3,574 high reached in early June.

Analysts both inside and outside Iran are skeptical of the official figures and believe the true level of infections and deaths is far higher. President Hassan Rouhani blamed people’s failure to observe preventive measures, especially wearing masks, for the surge in cases.

“Today, the Health Ministry gave a worrying report,” he said on Saturday. “The public’s observance, which was 82 percent in earlier weeks, has fallen to 62 percent.”

FASTFACTS

  • Iran’s total number of confirmed cases in the past 24 hours spiked by 2,845 to 419,043 and the death toll rose by 166 to 24,118. •Daily infections have remained above 2,000 for the past two weeks and are nearing the 3,574 high reached in early June. •551 new cases were reported in Saudi Arabia on Saturday, taking the total to 329,271. •Worldwide, the virus has infected just under 31 million people and killed nearly 960,000, amid fears of a ‘second wave.’
  • Daily infections have remained above 2,000 for the past two weeks and are nearing the 3,574 high reached in early June.
  • 551 new cases were reported in Saudi Arabia on Saturday, taking the total to 329,271.
  • Worldwide, the virus has infected just under 31 million people and killed nearly 960,000, amid fears of a ‘second wave.’

Meanwhile in Saudi Arabia daily coronavirus case numbers have fallen to a five-month low after 551 new cases were reported on Saturday, taking the total to 329,271. The death toll rose by 28 to 4,458. The last time the Kingdom recorded numbers in the 500s was April 15, when 518 cases were reported.

Worldwide, the virus has infected just under 31 million people and killed nearly 960,000, amid fears of a “second wave” of the pandemic after the first outbreaks early in the year.

European countries from Denmark to Greece have announced new restrictions to curb surging infections in some of their largest cities, and Britain is considering new measures to tackle an “inevitable” second wave of COVID-19.

The UK has reported the fifth-largest number of deaths from COVID-19 in the world, after the US, Brazil, India and Mexico. “We are now seeing a second wave coming in ... it is absolutely, I’m afraid, inevitable, that we will see it in this country,” Prime Minister Boris Johnson said.

England’s public health chief Yvonne Doyle said: “We’re seeing clear signs this virus is now spreading across all age groups and I am particularly worried by the increase … among older people. This could be a warning of far worse things to come.”