Saudi Arabia, UN member states urge global plan of action to ensure sustainable growth

Saudi Arabia, UN member states urge global plan of action to ensure sustainable growth
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Updated 01 September 2020

Saudi Arabia, UN member states urge global plan of action to ensure sustainable growth

Saudi Arabia, UN member states urge global plan of action to ensure sustainable growth

JEDDAH:  Saudi Arabia and other UN member states have called for joint global action to ensure sustainable growth for a better and secure future for generations to come.

To mark its 75th anniversary, the UN launched a global dialogue initiative UN75 earlier this year. It aims to increase international cooperation through dialogue and to come up with innovative ideas for sustainable development.

As part of the initiative, the Saudi Green Building Forum (SGBF) organized a discussion under the auspices of the King Abdulaziz Center for National Dialogue (KACND) and the UN.

Speakers at the forum called for global efforts to fight the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and to take measures to boost the global economy.

They were of the view that fighting these challenges is not possible for a single entity; it needs concerted efforts of all stakeholders.

Honorary guests included Dr. Mohammed Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League.
Highlighting the Saudi efforts against COVID-19, he said: “Calamities and disasters impact everyone but societies that are more vulnerable must be at the center of global attention and care.”

He stressed the need for local, regional, and international cooperation to ensure a secure future and growth.

Al-Issa said the Kingdom not only took effective measures to fight COVID-19 at the local level but it also generously contributed to the World Health Organization’s global efforts to check the spread of the virus and help people in need around the world.

Faisal Al-Fadl, the SGBF founder, said this global dialogue hopes to motivate decision-makers and young entrepreneurs to localize recommendations and propositions presented by experts.
 


Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
Updated 23 min 46 sec ago

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials

Saudi Arabia’s first COVID-19 vaccine set for clinical trials
  • It will go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority

RIYADH: Preclinical studies on the first Saudi vaccine against COVID-19 have been completed.

Professor of epidemiology Dr. Iman Almansour, who heads the team of researchers working on the vaccine at the Institute for Research and Medical Consultations (IRMC), affiliated with Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (IAU), confirmed to Arab News on Friday that the studies were complete, and said clinical trials would begin as soon as “the proper approvals” had been given.

She did not specify when that is expected to happen.

The Ministry of Education is financing the team’s project. The team’s research paper has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmaceuticals.

According to the published paper, the vaccine has so far proven effective, when used on animals, in eliciting antibodies that will target the virus. “The vaccine is given to the body to build protein inside cells, which stimulate the body to produce immunity specific to the S antigen,” Dr. Almansour explained.

Dr. Turki Almugaiteeb, director of Healthcare and Life Sciences at RPD Innovations, which runs the National Vaccine and Biomanufacturing Center, told Arab News: “There is a great focus on the results of medical research because of the pandemic. Research can play a great role in developing a vaccine that can be adopted and further developed in the future. We can say that the Kingdom has a strong infrastructure, which can help produce and manufacture a national vaccine.”

Both Almugaiteeb and Almansour stressed that the experimental vaccine will need to go through rigorous testing and several trial stages before it is approved for use by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority.

Prof. Nasser Al-Aqeeli, the deputy minister of education for research and innovation, said the ministry supported programs at the Kingdom’s universities with more than SR500 million ($133.3 million) in 2020.