Egypt sends aid to Sudan amid flood crisis

A Sudanese boy wades through a flooded street at the area of al-Qamayir in the capital's twin city of Omdurman, on August 26, 2020. (File/AFP)
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Updated 09 September 2020

Egypt sends aid to Sudan amid flood crisis

DUBAI: Egypt sent an aircraft carrying foodstuffs and medical aid to Khartoum and Juba as part of efforts to help support people affected by the flood in Sudan and South Sudan, local daily Egypt Today reported.
Recent floods in Sudan killed approximately 100 people and affected 500 thousand families in 16 states, with Khartoum being worst-hit by the crisis.
The move comes after President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi ordered the launch of an aid plane to the people of the flood-hit countries.
Meanwhile, Egypt’s Minster of Health Hala Zayed arrived in Sudan on Tuesday, leading a high-profile medical delegation to offer support and assistance to the Sudanese people.
The delegation included 20 physicians of various specialties and a nursing staff, Spokesman for the Health Ministry Khaled Megahed said.
The medical delegation will be divided into four groups that will be distributed on four different areas in Khartoum to assist people affected by the flood until it recedes, he added.
Bilateral talks will also take place between the two countries during Zayed’s visit to discuss the needs of Sudan’s health system. Megahed further said the minister will visit one of the affected areas to get informed about the health conditions in it.
“We are greatly overwhelmed with the Egyptians love and support which reflected on social media,” Sudanese Minister of Information Faisal Mohamed Saleh said.
He added that, “everyone knows the depth of relations between Egypt and Sudan and due to some political circumstances, that affected the two countries, the relationship between them remains deep, and we are grateful to the Egyptian government that sent our country urgent aid.”


Pan-Arab poll: Biden better for region, but must shun Obama policies

Updated 6 min 17 sec ago

Pan-Arab poll: Biden better for region, but must shun Obama policies

  • Majority of respondents to Arab News/YouGov survey consider neither candidate good for region
  • Findings show strong Arab support for Trump on Iran but not on Jerusalem embassy move

RIYADH: Nearly half the respondents in an Arab News/YouGov poll conducted in 18 Middle East and Africa (MENA) countries believe neither candidate in the upcoming US elections will necessarily be good for the region.
Of the rest, 40 percent said Democratic Party candidate Joe Biden would be better for the region while 12 percent said the same thing about incumbent President Donald Trump. But a key takeaway of the poll is that if Biden, who served as vice president to Barack Obama until 2017, wins the White House race, he would be well advised to shed the Obama administration baggage.
When asked about policies implemented in the Middle East under the Obama administration, the most popular response (53 percent) was that the Democratic president left the region worse off, with another 58 percent saying Biden should distance himself from Obama-era policies.
The study surveyed a sample of 3,097 respondents online to find out how people in the MENA region feel about the Nov. 3 US elections.

Opinion

This section contains relevant reference points, placed in (Opinion field)

Containing Iran was found to be one of the top four issues that respondents wanted the next US president to focus on. Strong support for Trump both maintaining a war posture against Iran and imposing strict sanctions against the Tehran regime was noticed in Iraq (53 percent), Lebanon (38 percent) and Yemen (54 percent), three countries that have had intimate regional dealings with Iran.
President Trump’s 2017 decision to move the US Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem proved overwhelmingly unpopular, with 89 percent of Arabs opposing it. Surprisingly, in contrast to most other Arabs, Palestinian respondents inside the Palestinian Territories indicated a greater desire for the US to play a bigger role in mediation with Israel.
Arab opinion was largely split on the elimination this year of Iran’s regional “satrap” Gen. Qassim Soleimani, with the single largest proportion of respondents from Iraq (57 percent) and Lebanon (41 percent) seeing it as a positive move, as opposed to those in Syria and Qatar, where most respondents — respectively 57 percent and 62 percent — saw it as negative for the region.

Iran also figured in the list of perceived threats to US interests, although well behind white nationalism (32 percent) and China (22 percent). The other critical challenges for the US as viewed by Arabs were cybercrime, radical Islamic terrorism and climate change.
For a country that touts itself as an ally of the US, public attitudes in Qatar were found to be surprisingly out of sync with US objectives in the Middle East. The perception of radical Islamic terrorism, Iran and Islamist parties as the “three biggest threats facing the region” was much softer in Qatar compared with the region as a whole.
It came as little surprise that three quarters of respondents want the next US administration to make it easier for people from Arab countries to travel to the US. The figure for Lebanon, for instance, was even higher, 79 percent, underscoring concerns that many young Arabs are actively trying to leave the region.
Among other findings, Arabs remain overwhelmingly concerned about such challenges as failed government (66 percent) and the economic slowdown (43 percent).
Close to half of the respondents (44 percent) would like to see the next US president focus on empowering young people in the Arab region and solving the Arab-Israeli conflict (44 percent), followed by containing COVID-19 (37 percent), reining in Iran and Hezbollah (24 percent), quashing radical Islamic terrorism (24 percent) and tackling climate change (17 percent).