What We Are Doing Today: Box by Sara

Short Url
Updated 18 September 2020

What We Are Doing Today: Box by Sara

If you enjoy eating freshly cut herbs with your food or simply like the idea of growing plants, Box by Sara may be perfect for you. It is a Saudi project that aims to make indoor planting easy and accessible to everyone.
The box is like a tiny garden — you can put it anywhere in your house and all the materials to grow your favorite seeds into plants are provided, including a mixing pot, soil bags, seeds, wooden sticks, a water sprayer and instruction card. The seeds provided are for growing culinary herbs including cilantro, parsley, dill and basil. The herbs make a great addition to salads, soups and or Italian dishes, and they are easy to grow indoors and in any weather.
You can place them in your kitchen window as they require light to flourish. The seeds will start to grow in one to two weeks.
Having an indoor plant, the process of planting seeds and watching them grow will help you to feel more connected with nature.
This box is an ideal gift for children and adults, family and friends. The greens box is available at salla.sa/boxbysarah


What We Are Reading Today: Gentlemen Revolutionaries by Tom Cutterham

Updated 20 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Gentlemen Revolutionaries by Tom Cutterham

In the years between the Revolutionary War and the drafting of the Constitution, American gentlemen—the merchants, lawyers, planters, and landowners who comprised the independent republic’s elite—worked hard to maintain their positions of power. Gentlemen Revolutionaries shows how their struggles over status, hierarchy, property, and control shaped the ideologies and institutions of the fledgling nation.

Tom Cutterham examines how, facing pressure from populist movements as well as the threat of foreign empires, these gentlemen argued among themselves to find new ways of justifying economic and political inequality in a republican society. At the heart of their ideology was a regime of property and contract rights derived from the norms of international commerce and 18th-century jurisprudence. But these gentlemen were not concerned with property alone. They also sought personal prestige and cultural preeminence. Cutterham describes how, painting the egalitarian freedom of the republic’s “lower sort” as dangerous licentiousness, they constructed a vision of proper social order around their own fantasies of power and justice.

 In pamphlets, speeches, letters, and poetry, they argued that the survival of the republican experiment in the US depended on the leadership of worthy gentlemen and the obedience of everyone else.

Lively and elegantly written, Gentlemen Revolutionaries demonstrates how these elites, far from giving up their attachment to gentility and privilege, recast the new republic in their own image.