Yemen blames Houthis for polio resurgence

Yemen blames Houthis for polio resurgence
A Yemeni child is inoculated against polio during an immunization campaign at a health center on August 15, 2015. (File/AFP)
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Updated 21 September 2020

Yemen blames Houthis for polio resurgence

Yemen blames Houthis for polio resurgence
  • Yemen was previously declared polio-free in 2006

DUBAI: Yemen’s National Emergency Committee have blamed the Houthis for the resurgence of the disease, polio, in militia-controlled areas of Sa’ada and Hajjah, saying they prevented vaccination teams from operating there, state news agency Saba News reported.
Yemen was previously declared polio-free in 2006.
The committee urged the United Nations and its agencies to put pressure on Houthis in order to enable vaccination and immunization teams to do their jobs.
It also ordered the Ministry of Public Health and Population to intensify vaccination campaigns and confirm the number of the registered polio cases.


Don’t fall for COVID-19 vaccine conspiracies, warns Muslim scholar

A protester holds up a placard at a demonstration in London in October against mandatory vaccinations. A leading Muslim scholar in Canada warned people not to believe conspiracy theories about the coronavirus vaccine. (AFP/File Photo)
A protester holds up a placard at a demonstration in London in October against mandatory vaccinations. A leading Muslim scholar in Canada warned people not to believe conspiracy theories about the coronavirus vaccine. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 8 min 33 sec ago

Don’t fall for COVID-19 vaccine conspiracies, warns Muslim scholar

A protester holds up a placard at a demonstration in London in October against mandatory vaccinations. A leading Muslim scholar in Canada warned people not to believe conspiracy theories about the coronavirus vaccine. (AFP/File Photo)
  • Sheikh Mohammed Tahir Al-Qadri says baseless claims go against tenets of Islam because ‘saving lives is an act of worship’

LONDON: A leading Muslim scholar in Canada has warned people not to be taken in by conspiracy theories about the coronavirus vaccine.

Sheikh Mohammed Tahir Al-Qadri said that such views, which are being spread by some on social media in an attempt to discourage people from being vaccinated, go against the tenets of Islam.

“Saving lives is an act of worship,” he said during an interview with Sky News. “At the start of the pandemic, Muslims around the world were among those in the forefront. They put their maximum efforts into saving lives, providing people with food and every kind of necessary support. In the same way, they should come forward now.”

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Al-Qadri, who is originally from Pakistan, sought to reassure his followers and encourage them not to believe false claims about the vaccines.

“Some people are saying that there is alcohol in it, or pork or other things forbidden (in Islam),” he said. “Some say these vaccines may affect certain parts of the brain. What can I say? These are totally baseless claims.

“This is a matter of medicinal development, of life, and it is just the same as when we take paracetamol, antibiotics or aspirins despite their side effects.

“Believing in the medical process is one of the basic teachings of Islam. Islam and the teachings of the Qur’an, the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, is focused on reason, intelligence, scientific research and intellectual development.”