Ex-PM May attacks ‘reckless’ UK Brexit plan

Conservative MP Theresa May walks through the Central Lobby toward the House of Lords to listen to the Queen’s Speech during the State Opening of Parliament, London, Britain, Oct. 14, 2019. (Reuters)
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Updated 21 September 2020

Ex-PM May attacks ‘reckless’ UK Brexit plan

  • May, whose 2016-2019 premiership was derailed by the tortuous Brexit process, said the draft law would “lead to untold damage to the United Kingdom’s reputation”
  • Johnson has argued it will provide a “safety net” against what he has claimed are EU threats to impose tariffs on UK internal trade

LONDON: Britain’s former prime minister Theresa May said Monday she would not support the government’s new Brexit legislation, which will break international law, accusing the government of acting “recklessly and irresponsibly.”
May, whose 2016-2019 premiership was derailed by the tortuous Brexit process, said the draft law would “lead to untold damage to the United Kingdom’s reputation.”
“As a result, with regret, I have to tell the minister I cannot support this bill,” she told fellow MPs as the proposed legislation underwent scrutiny in parliament.
The UK Internal Market Bill unveiled earlier this month would override parts of the Brexit treaty struck by May’s successor Boris Johnson with the European Union last year.
Ministers have admitted it would breach international law.
British lawmakers voted last week to allow the draft law to proceed for further scrutiny despite EU calls for it to be withdrawn.
Numerous MPs from the ruling Conservatives cautioned against adopting the most contentious measures in the legislation, but only two ended up voting against it while 29 abstained — including May.
Lawmakers will vote again on the bill on Tuesday next week before it goes to the House of Lords for weeks of further scrutiny.
Johnson has argued it will provide a “safety net” against what he has claimed are EU threats to impose tariffs on UK internal trade and even stop food going from mainland Britain to Northern Ireland.
But EU leaders have dismissed this as spin and warned Johnson to uphold commitments he made in the Brexit treaty last year and withdraw the offending parts of the new bill by the end of the month.
The row threatens to disrupt already tough post-Brexit trade negotiations, fueling growing fears of failure that would see more than four decades of EU-UK integration come to a crashing halt at the end of this year.
Britain left the EU in January but remains bound by the rules of the 27-member bloc until December 31.


Children killed in Afghan air strike that hit mosque: officials

Updated 32 min 6 sec ago

Children killed in Afghan air strike that hit mosque: officials

  • Provincial police spokesman Khalil Aseer: The air strike was carried out when the victims were busy studying the Holy Qur’an
  • The ministry of defense — who confirmed the strike was carried out by the Afghan air force — denied civilians had died

KUNDUZ, Afghanistan: An air strike by the Afghan military killed 11 children and a prayer leader at a mosque, local authorities said Thursday, in an account disputed by the national government.
The strike on a village in northeastern Takhar province on Wednesday came as Afghan security forces clashed with suspected Taliban fighters, according to provincial police spokesman Khalil Aseer.
“The air strike was carried out when the victims were busy studying the Holy Qur’an,” Aseer said, adding a prayer leader was killed and 11 students.
He said 14 others were wounded.
Mohammad Jawad Hejri, the spokesman for the provincial governor, also said the strike had killed children.
But the ministry of defense — who confirmed the strike was carried out by the Afghan air force — denied civilians had died.
“Twelve Taliban including several of their commanders were killed,” it said.
Afghanistan’s Vice President Amrullah Saleh said news that children had died in a mosque “was baseless.”
“Those who spread rumors will be dealt with,” he wrote on Facebook.
The ministry of defense said it had appointed a team to investigate.
“The enemy bombarded the mosque at a time when tens of children were busy in religious studies,” the Taliban said in a statement, adding the air strike had destroyed the mosque.
The Afghan military has a fledgeling air force and small attack planes capable of conducting limited close-air support for troops on the ground.
Heavy fighting in Takhar since Tuesday has left at least 25 Afghan security personnel dead, officials have said.
Despite joining peace talks with the government in Qatar last month, the Taliban have only increased violence in a bid to wield leverage in the negotiations.
The top US envoy to Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, said earlier this week that fighting is threatening the peace process.