Resistance exposes Iran’s secret nuclear weapons site

Resistance exposes Iran’s secret nuclear weapons site
Leaders of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) have unveiled details of a previously unknown Iranian nuclear site just east of Tehran. (Photo: Courtesy of the NCRI)
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Updated 16 October 2020

Resistance exposes Iran’s secret nuclear weapons site

Resistance exposes Iran’s secret nuclear weapons site
  • Site is located in Sorkheh-Hessar region and is operated by Iran’s Organization of Defensive Innovation and Research, group claims
  • NCRI said despite 2015 JCPOA agreement with the UN, Iran continues to deceive the world in pursuit of nuclear bomb

CHICAGO: Leaders of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) have unveiled details of a previously unknown Iranian nuclear site just east of Tehran.

The site is located in the Sorkheh-Hessar region and is operated by Iran’s Organization of Defensive Innovation and Research (SPND).

They argued that the identification of the new site exposes the Iranian regime’s lies and the failure of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the multinational deal on Iran’s nuclear program agreed in 2015.

“The exact location of the new site is on Damavand Highway, east of Tehran, two kilometers down the exit road to Sorkheh-Hessar,” said NCRI spokesman Alireza Jafazadeh. “At the entrance of this road, there is a checkpoint, as it is considered to be a military area. The location of this new site is north of the Khojir site, which is the largest complex manufacturing ballistic missiles for the Hemmat and Bakeri missile industry.”




General area of Tehran with Sorkheh-Hessar site. (Supplied)

Jafazadeh said the site is south of Iran’s command headquarters of the Aerospace Organization of Ministry of Defense and the Mechanical Industries of the Aerospace Organization, known as Mahallati Industries, located in Hakimiyeh area.

The new nuclear site is protected by Iran’s powerful military wing, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), he said.

Soona Samsami, the NCRI US representative said, “These new sites make it clear that the SPND, which pursues the building of nuclear weapons with the Ministry of Defense, is continuing its activities.

“Our revelation today once again proves that fact that the JCPOA did not prevent the mullahs’ strivings to acquire nuclear weapons and that the regime has even reneged on its commitments stipulated in the JCPOA. These activities have taken place since the JCPOA was signed in 2015 and even prior to the US leaving the Iran nuclear deal.”




The new SPND site shown with a circle; to the south is Khojir site and to the north is the headquarters of Aerospace Organization and Mahallati site. (Supplied)

Samsami said: “The JCPOA in 2015 overlooked some of the most undeniable aspects of the possible military dimensions of the Iranian regime’s nuclear weapons program. No wonder that the regime took no steps toward destroying its infrastructure in this regard. At best it temporarily stopped its overt operations.”

Jafazadeh said that despite the 2015 JCPOA agreement with the UN, Iran has continued to deceive the world in its pursuit of a nuclear bomb and they are “closer everyday.”

“The revelation today shows that the nuclear infrastructure that is tasked with building the bomb, the core of that program is the SPND, continues to thrive,” Jafarzadeh said.

“No parts of that program have been disbanded since 2015. It continued before the JCPOA, during the JCPOA and after the JCPOA.”




Satellite imagery of the location of new site of SPND for Chamran Group in Sorkheh-Hessar, east of Tehran. (Supplied)

The JCPOA deal was endorsed by UN Security Council Resolution 2231 and adopted on July 20, 2015. Iran’s compliance with the nuclear-related provisions of the JCPOA was to be verified by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

On May 8, 2018, President Trump denounced the JCPOA saying the US was withdrawing from it. He said he would reinstate a new more comprehensive embargo and sanctions on the Iranian regime, criticizing former President Barack Obama who helped to push the JCPOA agreement.

Jafarzadeh said the satellite photos, details of the newly revealed nuclear site and the names of the Iranian government officials who oversee the nuclear weapons construction at the site are being provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which oversees the nuclear production of its members.

“The construction project of the new site in Sorkheh-Hessar started in 2012 and its construction took several years. Around 2017, some sections of SPND, including the geophysics section, known as the Chamran Group gradually moved in, as the construction of other parts of the site were later completed,” Jafazadeh said.

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READ MORE: Atomic energy watchdog seeks details on secret Iranian nuclear site

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“By transferring parts of SPND, the activities of its different sections have expanded. By being located in a military area, it has found an appropriate cover to keep the identities of the personnel working there a secret.”

Jafazadeh said that according to information provided by the Iranian Resistance in June 2017, SPND is using an IRGC missile site south of Semnan, to the east of Tehran, to test its explosives.

Among the information provided to the IAEA are details about the Iranian personnel overseeing the nuclear weapons program. The site was built under the supervision of Admiral Ali Shamkhani, who was the minister of defense and logistics. The project was handled by companies working with the IRGC’s Khatam-al-Anbiya garrison’s engineering department. The IRGC who handled this project was engineer called Hashemi Tabar, who is in charge of IRGC’s secret projects and has been involved in the construction of IRGC’s tunnels and secret sites.


Free and fair Palestinians elections must include East Jerusalem: UN experts

Palestinian and Israeli activists demonstrate against the expulsion of Palestinian families from their homes, in the Palestinian neighbourhood of Sheikh Jarrah in Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem. (AFP/File Photo)
Palestinian and Israeli activists demonstrate against the expulsion of Palestinian families from their homes, in the Palestinian neighbourhood of Sheikh Jarrah in Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 7 min 50 sec ago

Free and fair Palestinians elections must include East Jerusalem: UN experts

Palestinian and Israeli activists demonstrate against the expulsion of Palestinian families from their homes, in the Palestinian neighbourhood of Sheikh Jarrah in Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem. (AFP/File Photo)
  • Israel as occupying force must clearly state it will allow elections in East Jerusalem and refrain from interfering in the rights and daily lives of Palestinians
  • Experts also called on Palestinian leadership to remove “unjustified” legal barriers that inhibit the democratic process and reschedule elections very soon

NEW YORK: UN human rights experts have urged both the Palestinian Authority and Israel to reschedule the presidential, legislative and municipal elections “in the very near future” and ensure that they are “peaceful and credible.”

In April, Palestinian president Mahmood Abbas issued a presidential decree postponing the elections — originally planned for May and July — “until the participation of our people in Jerusalem is guaranteed.”

He blamed Israel for uncertainty about whether it would allow Palestinians to vote in East Jerusalem.

Expressing concern over the postponement, the UN experts recalled the importance of the elections as a means to “address the long-standing internal political divisions, to strengthen accountable institutions and to take an important step toward achieving the fundamental national and individual rights of the Palestinian people.”

The experts include Martin Lynk, the special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territory; Irene Khan, special rapporteur on the protection of the right to freedom of expression; and Clement Nyaletsossi Voule, special rapporteur on rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association.

Special rapporteurs are independent experts who serve in individual capacities, and on a voluntary basis, at the UN’s Human Rights Council. They are not members of UN staff and are not paid for their work.

They called on Israel as an occupying power to “clearly state” that it will allow the democratic process to take place unhindered, and to “interfere as little as possible with the rights and daily lives of the Palestinians.”

The 1994 Oslo Accords between the Palestine Liberation Organization and the state of Israel provided for the right of Palestinians in East Jerusalem to participate in elections.

Article XI of the interim agreement explicitly stated that “the two sides view the West Bank and the Gaza Strip as a single territorial unit, the integrity and status of which will be preserved during the interim period.”

It has been 15 years since Palestinians last cast ballots. In previous elections, Palestinians from East Jerusalem had been allowed to cast their ballots, although not without difficulty.

In the lead-up to the 2006 elections, Israel launched a campaign of arrests against members of the Palestinian Legislative Council, revoked their Jerusalem identity cards, banned candidates from holding election campaigns inside Jerusalem and prohibited public meetings and rallies.

Recalling the UN Security Council and General Assembly’s statements that any Israeli alterations to East Jerusalem and its political and legal status are “null and void,” the experts called the present moment “a golden opportunity for the world to affirm these commitments in the name of democracy and international law.”

They called on the Palestinian Authority to reschedule the elections “in the very near future,” and demanded that “the democratic rights of voters, candidates, political parties and participants (be) fully respected by all, including the occupying power. 

“Arrests and detentions and the disruption of political meetings and campaigning by any governing authority are utterly incompatible with international human rights protections.”

The human rights experts said that they were “disturbed” by the eligibility rules established by the Palestinian authority for the upcoming elections, including a requirement that each political list pay a $20,000 registration fee and that candidates working in civil society resign from their current jobs in order to run.

The experts said these rules “appear to create unjustified obstacles (and) inhibit the full and free participation of Palestinians in the democratic process.” They called on the Palestinian leadership to remove these legal barriers.

The human rights experts concluded: “We do not underestimate the challenges of holding free and fair democratic elections while under an entrenched and harsh occupation.

“We welcome the assistance offered by the international community, particularly the European Union and the United Nations, to facilitate these elections. But the elections will only achieve credibility and open the door to political renewal, particularly among younger Palestinians, if all sides respect the values of democracy and human rights.”


Iraq records 12,000 COVID-19 infections in new daily high

Iraq records 12,000 COVID-19 infections in new daily high
Updated 26 July 2021

Iraq records 12,000 COVID-19 infections in new daily high

Iraq records 12,000 COVID-19 infections in new daily high
  • Much of the 40-million-strong population remains skeptical of vaccines
  • More than 1.5 million people have now tested positive and 18,347 have officially died of Covid-19 in Iraq

BAGHDAD: Iraq has recorded 12,180 Covid infections over the past 24 hours, the health ministry said on Monday, the highest number detected in a single day so far in the pandemic.
More than 1.5 million people have now tested positive and 18,347 have officially died of Covid-19 in Iraq, where the health infrastructure is dilapidated.
Much of the 40-million-strong population remains skeptical of vaccines, with only 1.3 million having been inoculated, the health ministry says.
It is not clear how many of those have received two jabs.
Monday’s record “unfortunately, does not surprise us because of a lack of respect for mandatory hygiene measures such as a ban on gatherings and mask wearing,” ministry spokesman Saif Al-Badr said.
“This increase is probably due to the large number of gatherings during the Eid” Al-Adha festival marking the end of the annual Muslim Hajj pilgrimage, he said.
The authorities have struggled to persuade people to get vaccinated and to abide by measures such as wearing face masks in public.
Earlier this month, Sarmad Al-Qarlousi, who heads Baghdad’s Al-Kindi Hospital, warned that unless more people get jabbed, Iraq will spiral toward “an epidemiological catastrophe.”
The ministry spokesman has blamed a reluctance to get inoculated on a “misinformation campaign which preceded the arrival of the vaccine.”
On Monday Badr renewed his appeal to Iraqis to get vaccinated, saying the spike in infections is putting pressure on the country’s fragile health infrastructure.
Two huge fires at Covid-19 hospital wards in April and in mid-July killed more than 120 people, sparking anger and defiance among Iraqis who blame corruption for the failing health system.


UAE reports 1,549 new COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths in last 24 hours

UAE reports 1,549 new COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths in last 24 hours
Updated 26 July 2021

UAE reports 1,549 new COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths in last 24 hours

UAE reports 1,549 new COVID-19 cases, 7 deaths in last 24 hours
  • 1,510 individuals had fully recovered from COVID-19, bringing patient recoveries to 650,683

DUBAI: The UAE on Monday reported 1,549 new COVID-19 cases and seven deaths overnight, bringing the total number of recorded cases to 673,185 with 1,927 fatalities related to the highly contagious disease.

The Ministry of Health and Prevention also said that 1,510 individuals had fully recovered from COVID-19, bringing patient recoveries to 650,683.

An 232,389 additional COVID-19 tests were also over the past 24 hours, the ministry added in a statement published by state news agency WAM.

The UAE’s aggressive vaccination drive has resulted into a 77.85 percent of the population receiving a first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, while 68.75 percent have been fully vaccinated.

The total number of doses provided stands at 16,495,917 with a rate of vaccine distribution of 166.79 doses per 100 people, the ministry reported.


Biden, Iraqi PM to announce end of US combat mission in Iraq

Biden, Iraqi PM to announce end of US combat mission in Iraq
Updated 26 July 2021

Biden, Iraqi PM to announce end of US combat mission in Iraq

Biden, Iraqi PM to announce end of US combat mission in Iraq
  • Plan to shift the American military mission will be spelled out in a broader
  • The Daesh is a shell of its former self since it was largely routed on the battlefield in 2017

WASHINGTON: President Joe Biden and Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi are expected to announce on Monday that they’ve come to an agreement to end the US military’s combat mission in Iraq by the end of the year, according to a senior Biden administration official.
The plan to shift the American military mission, whose stated purpose is to help Iraq defeat the Daesh group, to a strictly advisory and training role by year’s end — with no US troops in a combat role — will be spelled out in a broader communique to be issued by the two leaders following their White House meeting on Monday afternoon, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the yet to be announced plan.
The official said the Iraqi security forces are “battle tested” and have proved themselves “capable” of protecting their country. Still, the Biden administration recognizes that Daesh remains a considerable threat, the official said.
Indeed, the Daesh terror organization is a shell of its former self since it was largely routed on the battlefield in 2017. Still, it has shown it can still carry out high-casualty attacks. Last week, the group claimed responsibility for a roadside bombing that killed at least 30 people and wounded dozens in a busy suburban Baghdad market.
The US and Iraq agreed in April that the US transition to a train-and-advise mission meant the US combat role would end, but they didn’t settle on a timetable for completing that transition. The announcement comes less than three months before parliamentary elections slated for Oct. 10.
Al-Kadhimi faces no shortage of problems. Iranian-backed militias operating inside Iraq have stepped up attacks against US forces in recent months, and a series of devastating hospital fires that left dozens of people dead and soaring coronavirus infections have added fresh layers of frustration for the nation.
For Al-Kadhimi, the ability to offer the Iraqi public a date for the end of the US combat presence could be a feather in his cap ahead of the election.
Biden administration officials say Al-Kadhimi also deserves credit for improving Iraq’s standing in the Mideast.
Last month, King Abdullah II of Jordan and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi visited Baghdad for joint meetings — the first time an Egyptian president has made an official visit since the 1990s, when ties were severed after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait.
In March, Pope Francis made a historic visit to Iraq, praying among ruined churches in Mosul, a former IS stronghold, and meeting with the influential Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali Al-Sistani in the holy city of Najaf.
The US and Iraq have been widely expected to use the face-to-face meeting to announce plans for the end of the combat mission, and Al-Kadhimi before his trip to Washington made clear that he believes it’s time for the US to wind down the combat mission.
“There is no need for any foreign combat forces on Iraqi soil,” Al-Kadhimi said.
The US troop presence has stood at about 2,500 since late last year when former President Donald Trump ordered a reduction from 3,000.
The announcement to end the US combat mission in Iraq comes as the US is in the final stages of ending its war in Afghanistan, nearly 20 years after President George W. Bush launched the war in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.
The US mission of training and advising Iraqi forces has its most recent origins in former President Barack Obama’s decision in 2014 to send troops back to Iraq. The move was made in response to the Daesh group’s takeover of large portions of western and northern Iraq and a collapse of Iraqi security forces that appeared to threaten Baghdad. Obama had fully withdrawn US forces from Iraq in 2011, eight years after the US invasion.
The distinction between combat troops and those involved in training and advising can be blurry, given that the US troops are under threat of attack. But it is clear that US ground forces have not been on the offensive in Iraq in years, other than largely unpublicized special operations missions aimed at Daesh group militants.
Pentagon officials for years have tried to balance what they see as a necessary military presence to support the Iraqi government’s fight against IS with domestic political sensitivities in Iraq to a foreign troop presence. A major complication for both sides is the periodic attacks on bases housing US and coalition troops by Iraqi militia groups aligned with Iran.
The vulnerability of US troops was demonstrated most dramatically in January 2020 when Iran launched a ballistic missile attack on Al-Asad air base in western Iraq. No Americans were killed, but dozens suffered traumatic brain injury from the blasts. That attack came shortly after a US drone strike killed Iranian military commander Qassim Soleimani and senior Iraqi militia commander Abu Mahdi Al-Muhandis at Baghdad International Airport.
The US military mission since 2014 has been largely focused on training and advising Iraqi forces. In April, in a joint statement following a US-Iraqi meeting in Washington, they declared, “the mission of US and coalition forces has now transitioned to one focused on training and advisory tasks, thereby allowing for the redeployment of any remaining combat forces from Iraq” at a time to be determined later.
Monday’s communique is also expected to detail US efforts to assist the Iraqi government’s COVID-19 response, education system and energy sector.


Lebanese PM-designate Mikati aims to form gov't to implement reform plan

Lebanese PM-designate Mikati aims to form gov't to implement reform plan
Updated 56 min 31 sec ago

Lebanese PM-designate Mikati aims to form gov't to implement reform plan

Lebanese PM-designate Mikati aims to form gov't to implement reform plan
  • Veteran politician Hariri gave up on cabinet formation
  • Mikati says no magic wand but has international guarantees

BEIRUT: Lebanese businessman Najib Mikati secured enough votes in parliamentary consultations on Monday to be designated the next prime minister, and now faces the difficult challenge of forming a viable government to tackle a financial crisis.
Mikati has been prime minister twice before and, unlike many Lebanese leaders, does not represent a political bloc or hail from a dynasty. He received 72 votes out of a total of 118 members of parliament.
Like previous nominee Saad Al-Hariri, he must navigate the sectarian, power-sharing structure and secure agreement on a cabinet equipped to address the financial meltdown in Lebanon, one of the world's most heavily indebted states.
"I don't have a magic wand and I can't work miracles," Mikati said after his nomination, but added that he had been studying the situation and had "the necessary international guarantees". Mikati is the third person to be nominated since Hassan Diab's government resigned after an explosion at Beirut's port area on Aug. 4 last year that killed more than 200 people and flattened large areas of the city.
Diab's government has stayed on in a caretaker capacity since then, but Lebanon's currency has collapsed, jobs have vanished and banks have frozen accounts in the country's worst crisis since the 1975-90 civil war.
Mikati said he was confident he could form a government, and its first priority would be to implement a reform plan by former colonial power France.
The French roadmap envisioned a government of specialists capable of implementing reforms and engaging the International Monetary Fund.
Hezbollah, the heavily armed Shi'ite Islamist movement that the United States deems a terrorist group, nominated Mikati in Monday's consultations. Most of the main parliamentary blocs endorsed the choice.
Muhammad Raad, the leader of Hezbollah's parliamentary bloc, told reporters there were signs hinting at the possibility of forming a government and "that's why we named Mikati, to give an extra boost to facilitate forming a government."
Hezbollah is an ally of President Michel Aoun.
Among Mikati's endorsers was Hariri who, after nearly 10 months, abandoned efforts to form a government last week after failing to agree its composition with Aoun.
Hariri told reporters after meeting Aoun that he hoped Mikati, a telecoms tycoon, would be chosen and succeed in forming a cabinet, adding: "The country has a chance today."
The news of Mikati's likely designation boosted the Lebanese pound earlier on Monday on the unofficial parallel market, where dollars changed hands at around 16,500 pounds, compared to over 22,000 at the height of the deadlock over the government.
In Lebanon's political system, the post of prime minister has to be held by a Sunni Muslim, while the presidency is held by a Maronite Christian.
Western governments have been piling pressure on Lebanon to form a government that can set about reforming the corruption-marred state. They have threatened to impose sanctions and said financial support will not flow before reforms begin.