Iranian activists claim regime has hidden nuclear facility

Iranian activists claim regime has hidden nuclear facility
Activists have exposed Iran’s secret production of nuclear weapons. They said details of the nuclear site will be revealed at a press conference on Friday. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 15 October 2020

Iranian activists claim regime has hidden nuclear facility

Iranian activists claim regime has hidden nuclear facility
  • ‘The mullahs of Iran are a thousand times more rotten, decadent,’ says Ali Safavi

DETROIT: Ali Safavi, a member of Iran’s parliament in exile, said on Wednesday that Iran has built a nuclear weapons site that it has been hiding from the rest of the world in violation of international law.

Safavi, who said the details of the nuclear site would be revealed at a press conference on Friday by the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), added that the world needed to act not only to block Iran’s production of nuclear weapons but to stop the regime’s repression and brutality against its people.

Appearing on Detroit-based radio program “The Ray Hanania Show,” which is sponsored by Arab News newspaper and the US Arab Radio Network, Safavi said Europe especially had failed to act to stop the massacres from taking place.

 

 

“The European countries out of economic interests, their shortsighted interests, they are basically losing the strategic game. They should instead side with the people of Iran,” Safavi said.

“This regime is on its way out. For the Europeans to continue to deal with this regime commercially, politically, and lend it legitimacy, they are betting on a losing horse. And, of course, come liberation day, the Iranian people will remember all of this.”

Safavi added that “no amount of political concession, economic concession, saved the Shah from being overthrown,” referring to the late Shah Reza Pahlavi who was ousted in February 1979 after 38 years in power.

“The mullahs of Iran are a thousand times more rotten, decadent, repressive and illegitimate,” Safavi said.

“It’s high time from our perspective that the Europeans abandon this policy and join the policy of maximum pressure and hold the regime to maximum pressure and hold the regime to account.”

 

 

Following Safavi’s radio appearance, NCRI officials announced that they would host a press conference on Friday, October 16, to unveil details of the secret nuclear facility in Iran and provide satellite imagery and the names of the key Iranian regime officials involved.

Safavi and NCRI officials said that information on the nuclear center and the Iranian regime’s nuclear bomb-making efforts had been provided by the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MEK) network within Iran.

“Over the past two decades, the NCRI has exposed some of the most important sites and centers of Tehran’s nuclear weapons program,” they said.

They listed them as the Natanz uranium enrichment and Arak heavy water sites in August 2002; the Kalaye electric centrifuge assembly and testing facility in February 2003; the Lavizan-Shian sites in May 2003; the Fordo underground enrichment site in December 2005; the Organization of Defensive Innovation and Research, SPND (in July 2011) and METFAZ’s Pazhouheshkadeh at Plan 6 in Parchin in April 2017.

Safavi blamed the failure of European nations to rally against supporting the Iranian regime, a pattern he said was reflected in the failed policies of President Donald Trump’s predecessor Barack Obama.

“You have seen for example the Obama administration and the so-called Iran nuclear deal which has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to Iran including $1.8 billion in cash. What did that do?’ Safavi asked.

 

 

“First of all it didn’t stop Iran from continuing its nuclear weapons war. It didn’t stop the regime from expanding and advancing its ballistic missile program. Nor did it stop the regime from spreading its nefarious activities to the rest of the Middle East.”

More must be done, he said.

“The question in my mind and in the minds of millions of Iranians, is why is Europe doing this? Back in 2009 when millions were in the streets of Iran calling for the overthrow of the mullahs chanting death to the dictators,” Safavi said.

“They were also chanting in the same breath Obama are you with us or are you with the mullahs? Of course, everyone knows that the Obama administration was silent about that and of course the mullahs prevailed by the use of force.”

 

 

Safavi said the Europeans must do more and that even President Trump, who had done a great deal, could also do more.

“I think the (Trump) administration can do more, certainly. I think it should work to provide Iranians with the kind of technology that they could have access to the Internet at the times of protests and uprising so that the mullahs cannot cut them off from the rest of the world,” he said, noting the Iranian resistance was staying out of the American general elections.

“They can totally cut off the regime from the world and national system. They can maybe present a resolution at the UN Security Council calling for the Iranian regimes’ human rights dossier to be addressed and those responsible to be held accountable,” he said.


Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries

Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries
Updated 32 min 33 sec ago

Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries

Blow to global vaccine drive as Pfizer delays deliveries
  • Pfizer said the modifications at the Puurs factory were necessary in order to ramp up its production capacity from mid-February of the vaccine
  • There will be “a significant increase” in deliveries in late February and March, the US group promised

BERLIN: A global coronavirus vaccine rollout suffered a major blow Friday as Pfizer said it would delay shipments of the jabs in the next three to four weeks due to works at its key plant in Belgium.
Pfizer said the modifications at the Puurs factory were necessary in order to ramp up its production capacity from mid-February of the vaccine developed with Germany’s BioNTech.
There will be “a significant increase” in deliveries in late February and March, the US group promised. The European Commission also confirmed that promised doses for the first quarter will arrive within the period.
But European Union nations, which are desperately waiting for more doses to immunize their populations against the virus that has already claimed almost two million lives worldwide, expressed frustration.
Germany, the EU’s biggest economy, voiced regret over the “last minute and unexpected” delay.
It urged the European Commission — which undertook joint procurement for the bloc — to “seek clarity and certainty” for upcoming shipments.
Six northern EU nations also warned in a letter to the Commission that the “unacceptable” situation “decreases the credibility of the vaccination process.”
The letter signed by ministers from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden further asked the Commission to “demand a public explanation of the situation” from the pharmaceutical companies.
Across the Atlantic, Canada also said it was impacted by the delays, calling it “unfortunate.”
“However, such delays and issues are to be expected when global supply chains are stretched well beyond their limits,” said Canada’s Procurement Minister Anita Anand.
Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccine, which was developed at record-breaking speed, became the first to be approved for general use by a Western country on December 2 when Britain gave it the go ahead.
After Britain rolled out its immunization drive, the EU followed from December 27.
The latest shipment delay will likely add fuel to anger over the bloc’s vaccination campaign, which has already been criticized for being too slow compared to the United States or former EU member Britain.
The European Commission has also been accused of not securing enough doses early enough.
Just last week, the EU struck a deal to double its supply of the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine to 600 million doses.
The urgency of immunizing the population has grown over fears of virus variants first seen in South Africa and Britain, which officials warn are more infectious.
But vaccine makers had repeatedly warned that production capacity was limited.
While Pfizer is augmenting capacity at Puurs, its partner BioNTech on Friday secured authorization to begin production at Germany’s Marburg.
The challenges of getting millions of vaccines around the world are also huge as the BioNTech/Pfizer jabs must be stored at ultra-low temperatures of about minus 70 degrees Celsius (-94 Fahrenheit) before being shipped to distribution centers in specially-designed cool boxes filled with dry ice.
Once out of ultra-cold storage, the vaccine must be kept at two Celsius to eight Celsius to remain effective for up to five days.