Turkey to impose new COVID-19 measures to curb virus spread

The country’s interior ministry earlier issued a circular to all 81 provinces which focuses on the issues of risk management, social isolation, social distancing, controlling the spread of the virus, hygiene, the use of masks, and possible risks. (File/AFP)
Short Url
Updated 19 October 2020

Turkey to impose new COVID-19 measures to curb virus spread

  • Committees in charge with Turkey’s COVID-19 mitigation strategy will meet next week

DUBAI: Turkey will impose new coronavirus measures amid rising infections across the country, local daily Hurriyet Daily News reported.
The country’s interior ministry earlier issued a circular to all 81 provinces which focuses on the issues of risk management, social isolation, social distancing, controlling the spread of the virus, hygiene, the use of masks, and possible risks.
Turkey recorded 1,815 new coronavirus infections and 1,504 recoveries in the past 24 hours. It also confirmed the death of 72 people, taking the death toll to 9,296.
Committees in charge with Turkey’s COVID-19 mitigation strategy will meet next week to discuss topics of tracking, supervision and warnings, the interior ministry.
“The new measures should follow the committees’ meetings, but no date was given for their announcement,” the report said.


Zarif ‘desperate’ to blame Saudi Arabia for anything negative that happens in Iran: Al-Jubeir

Updated 01 December 2020

Zarif ‘desperate’ to blame Saudi Arabia for anything negative that happens in Iran: Al-Jubeir

  • “It is not the policy of Saudi Arabia to engage in assasinations; unlike Iran” minister tweeted

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel Al-Jubeir said on Tuesday Mohammad Zarif, Iranian foreign minister, was “desperate” to blame Saudi Arabia for anything negative that happens in Iran.

“Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif is desperate to blame the Kingdom for anything negative that happens in Iran. Will he blame us for the next earthquake or flood?” he tweeted.

“It is not the policy of Saudi Arabia to engage in assasinations; unlike Iran, which has done so since the Khomeini Revolution in 1979. Ask us, and ask many other countries who have lost many of their citizens due to Iran’s criminal and illegal behavior,” he added.

Al-Jubeir's comments come after Iranian nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was killed in an ambush near Tehran on Friday.

Fakhrizadeh has been described by Western and Israeli intelligence services for years as the leader of a covert atomic bomb programme halted in 2003, which Israel and the United States accuse Tehran of trying to restore in secret.

Iran has blamed external entities, including Israel and an exiled opposition group, for the killing.