Startup of the Week: Oh My Pinz! Expressing one’s personality in a fun and creative way

Startup of the Week: Oh My Pinz! Expressing one’s personality in a fun and creative way
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Startup of the Week: Oh My Pinz! Expressing one’s personality in a fun and creative way
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Photo/Supplied
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Updated 27 October 2020

Startup of the Week: Oh My Pinz! Expressing one’s personality in a fun and creative way

Startup of the Week: Oh My Pinz! Expressing one’s personality in a fun and creative way
  • The brand’s customers can create custom orders for a minimum of 100 pieces per design

Fashion is a way to express yourself and make a statement through accessories. Oh My Pinz! is a Saudi enamel pin brand established in November 2018 by Yousef Ibrahim.
“Like the right emoji to punctuate text, the perfect combination of pins on apparel can let people know exactly who you are,” Ibrahim told Arab News. “Enamel pins are the new way of expressing identity, lifestyle and personality.”
Oh My Pinz! is committed to creating a community where enamel pin makers and enthusiasts can make their own creative, affordable and fun environment. The brand offers both hard and soft enamel varieties.
They offer a diverse range of products, from designs that display Saudi singer Talal Maddah and other Saudi symbols such as Mabkhara (incense burners), to cartoon and video game characters such as Crash Bandicoot and Spiderman.
The brand has created pins for universities across the Kingdom, and religious symbols, including the Holy Kaaba and the Green Dome. The brand’s customers can create custom orders for a minimum of 100 pieces per design.
It is important to know the difference between hard and soft enamel when deciding on custom-made pins.
Hard enamel’s defining characteristics are the thin metal lines that separate each color with a smooth enamel finish. The pins are made from die-struck iron metal and produced by being heated to a high temperature and then polished to create a smooth surface, which gives them a durable touch.
Soft enamel’s defining characteristic, however, is a textured pin surface that allows greater detail and is slightly cheaper. They are made from die-struck iron metal and are electroplated, which gives them a thin feel when compared with hard enamel pins. Hard enamel materials come in gold, rose gold, copper, nickel, black nickel, matte gold and matte nickel.
Soft enamel materials come in gold, rose gold, copper, nickel, black nickel, matte gold, matte nickel, black dye, antique gold, antique bronze, Pantone dyed (any solid coated color and white dyed), antique copper, antique silver, antique nickel, brass and rainbow.
The Saudi enamel pin brand also produced pins to raise awareness of the importance of social distancing and health precautions. The range was called “We are all responsible” in Arabic.
“We created a special pin that shows every single member of the community that we share the responsibility in a pandemic,” said Ibrahim. “We are experts when it comes to pin designs and deep technical metal crafting, with which we plan to support health decisions.”

 


Palestinian short film ‘The Present’ wins BAFTA award

Farah Nabulsi wrote the film along with US-Palestinian filmmaker Hind Shoufani. Supplied
Farah Nabulsi wrote the film along with US-Palestinian filmmaker Hind Shoufani. Supplied
Updated 44 min 4 sec ago

Palestinian short film ‘The Present’ wins BAFTA award

Farah Nabulsi wrote the film along with US-Palestinian filmmaker Hind Shoufani. Supplied

DUBAI: Palestinian-British filmmaker Farah Nabulsi’s short film “The Present” has won the award for Best Short Film at the 2021 British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) ceremony, which took place on Saturday. 

Nabulsi’s movie beat out “Eyelash,” “Lizard,” “Lucky Break” and “Curvy.” 

“The Present” tells the story of Yusef, played by renowned Palestinian actor Saleh Bakri, and his daughter Yasmine, played by young actress Maryam Kanj, who set out in Palestine’s West Bank to buy his wife a gift.

The film is also in the running for the “Best Live Action Short Film” category at the upcoming 2021 Oscars. 

It is competing against Doug Roland’s “Feeling Through,” Elvira Lind’s short drama “The Letter Room,” Travon Free’s “Two Distant Strangers” and the Tomer Shushan-directed “White Eye.”


Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project

Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project
Shalimar Sharbatly will paint a new set of vehicles for the Draw a Nation initiative. (Supplied)
Updated 10 April 2021

Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project

Saudi artist in the driver’s seat for new Jeddah street project
  • Draw a Nation comes within the framework of initiatives to improve the visual appeal of Jeddah’s streetscapes

RIYADH: A Saudi abstract artist who won global recognition for her hand-painted and customized cars will paint a new set of vehicles for an extended edition of the Draw a Nation initiative after signing an agreement with the Jeddah municipality.
Shalimar Sharbatly, a pioneer of the “Moving Art” school, was responsible for both a hand-painted, customized Porsche 911, showcased at the Paris Motor Show, and a Formula 1 racer, known as “La Torq,” which was unveiled at the 2017 Monaco Grand Prix.
Both vehicles were also exhibited at the Louvre museum in Paris as part of a “Moving Art” exhibition in 2017.
However, within the Kingdom, Sharbatly is best known for the Draw a Nation initiative, which saw her showcase several of her hand-painted vehicles during last year’s Saudi National Day celebrations.
Sharbatly was inspired to upcycle old cars after witnessing an accident while driving along the beach in Jeddah. She told Arab News that painting the vehicles helped her regain a sense of purpose.

BACKGROUND

Shalimar Sharbatly, a pioneer of the ‘Moving Art’ school, was responsible for both a hand-painted, customized Porsche 911, showcased at the Paris Motor Show, and a Formula 1 racer, known as ‘La Torq,’ which was unveiled at the 2017 Monaco Grand Prix.

“I had become disillusioned with art and was lacking passion. I started painting these cars, turning abandoned vehicles that were deemed useless into vibrant and beautiful works of art that could gain a second life. I hope that when others view these pieces, they will feel the same joy I felt when I was painting them,” she said.
Draw a Nation comes within the framework of initiatives to improve the visual appeal of Jeddah’s streetscapes. The goal is to paint a number of old and abandoned cars and vehicles, turning them into works of art that enrich the city.
Ayed Al-Zahrani, undersecretary for the mayor of Jeddah for community service, said: “The community will benefit from recycling cars and turning them into artistic masterpieces displayed in public for Jeddah residents and visitors.”
The Jeddah municipality also previously launched the “Yalla Jeddah” platform, which invites innovators in all fields to address challenges facing Jeddah’s art scene.


Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city

Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city
Updated 10 April 2021

Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city

Egypt to unveil ‘portion’ of 3,000-year old city
  • Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass had announced earlier this week the discovery of the “lost golden city”
  • Items of jewelry have been unearthed, along with colored pottery vessels, scarab beetle amulets and mud bricks

LUXOR: Archaeologists near Luxor have unearthed just a portion of the “largest” ancient city ever found in Egypt and dating to a golden pharaonic age 3,000 years ago, officials said Saturday.
Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass had announced earlier this week the discovery of the “lost golden city,” saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of the legendary Valley of the Kings.
“We found one portion of the city only. But the city extends to the west and the north,” Hawass told AFP Saturday ahead of a press conference in the archaeologically rich area.
Betsy Bryan, professor of Egyptian art and archaeology at Johns Hopkins University, had said the find was the “second most important archaeological discovery since the tomb of Tutankhamun” nearly a century ago, according to the excavation team’s statement on Thursday.
Items of jewelry have been unearthed, along with colored pottery vessels, scarab beetle amulets and mud bricks bearing seals of Amenhotep III.
The team began excavations in September between the temples of Ramses III and Amenhotep III near Luxor, some 500 kilometers (300 miles) south of Cairo.
Amenhotep III inherited an empire that stretched from the Euphrates River in modern Iraq and Syria to Sudan and died around 1354 BC, ancient historians say.
He ruled for nearly four decades, a reign known for its opulence and the grandeur of its monuments, including the Colossi of Memnon — two massive stone statues near Luxor that represent him and his wife.
“It’s not only a city — we can see... economic activity, workshops and ovens,” Mostafa Waziri, head of the country’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, said Saturday.
Since the announcement, some scholars have disputed that Hawass and his team have succeeded where others had failed by locating the city.
Egyptologist Tarek Farag posted Friday on Facebook that the area was first excavated more than a century ago by a team from New York’s Metropolitan Museum.
But Waziri dismissed these concerns, saying previous digs had taken place further afield to the south the site.


US singer Alicia Keys serenades students in Saudi Arabia

The Grammy Award-winning singer has visited Saudi Arabia multiple times. File/Instagram
The Grammy Award-winning singer has visited Saudi Arabia multiple times. File/Instagram
Updated 10 April 2021

US singer Alicia Keys serenades students in Saudi Arabia

The Grammy Award-winning singer has visited Saudi Arabia multiple times. File/Instagram

DUBAI: US hitmaker Alicia Keys recently gave an impromptu performance to Saudi students and staff at Madrasat AdDeera in AlUla.

The performance, which was posted onto Instagram by Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Culture Prince Badr bin Abdullah on Friday, saw the award-winning singer perform her hit “Fallin’’ in front of students and staff at a girls’ school.

The Grammy Award winner has visited Saudi Arabia numerous times. 

Keys was one of the headliners of Riyadh Season 2019, alongside Bruno Mars, Pitbull and John Legend who all performed concerts across the capital city.

And according to a recent photo that has been circulating around Twitter, the “Girl on Fire” singer was in the Kingdom even more recently than that.

The photo in question, posted by Twitter user @dcantiheroes, is a screenshot from April 9 taken from Hassan Ghoneim’s Instagram Stories that showed the Saudi media personality standing beside Keys.

If the picture was taken over the weekend, that means that Keys was in town when Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli performed at the UNESCO World Heritage Site, AlUla.


Syria juice vendor gears up for Ramadan as crisis bites

Syria juice vendor gears up for Ramadan as crisis bites
Updated 11 April 2021

Syria juice vendor gears up for Ramadan as crisis bites

Syria juice vendor gears up for Ramadan as crisis bites
  • The popular street vendor says he usually has more customers during Ramadan
  • On his daily rounds of the Hamidiyah covered market, dozens of customers approach him to quench their thirst

DAMASCUS: In a busy market in Syria’s capital, 53-year-old Ishaaq Kremed serenades customers and agilely pours tamarind juice from the ornate brass jug on his back ahead of Ramadan.
The popular street vendor says he usually has more customers during the Islamic holy month starting next week, during which many favor the drink to break their day-long fast at sundown.
But he says his trade of more than 40 years has also taken on new meaning since the war-torn country has been plunged into economic crisis.
“My main job is to make customers smile,” says the moustachioed father of 16, dressed in billowing trousers, a patterned waistcoat and red fez.
“What’s most important is that they leave me feeling happy — that whoever turns up stressed leaves feeling content,” adds the street vendor.
On his daily rounds of the Hamidiyah covered market, dozens of customers approach him to quench their thirst, often taking pictures of him and his traditional get-up with their cellphones.
As he nimbly pours juice in long streams into plastic cups, he distracts them for a while with a song.
A surgical face mask lowered under his chin, Kremed intones lyrics for a mother and her two young daughters, before handing her a cup of the dark brown beverage.
He takes his fez off to collect his payment, then places it back on the top of his head.
Another man, dressed in a long white robe, joins Kremed in a song then gives him a peck on the cheek as he leaves.
Syria’s economic crisis has sent prices soaring and caused the national currency to plummet in value against the dollar on the black market.
In a country where a large majority of people live in poverty, Syrians have also had to contend with several lockdowns to stem the spread of coronavirus.
“For three years, Ramadan has been different because of people’s financial worries,” Kremed says.
“When people come to the market, you see them bumping into each other as if they were in a daze.”
The Damascus government blames the economic crisis on Western sanctions, but economists say the conflict, the pandemic and the financial crisis in neighboring Lebanon are also major factors.
Some state institutions have temporarily been closed over the pandemic and the economic crisis, but for now, markets remain open.
Although he does his best to keep up a cheery demeanour, Kremed says he too is feeling the effects of the economic crunch.
Tamarind and sugar are becoming increasingly costly, he says, and not everyone has enough spare cash for a refreshment.
“People’s priorities have become putting food and drink on the table, before tamarind juice,” he says.