REVIEW: Shadows loom over ‘Rebecca’

“Rebecca” is Netflix’s adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel. (Supplied)
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Updated 29 October 2020

REVIEW: Shadows loom over ‘Rebecca’

  • Adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel lacks the substance to back its style

LONDON: Following a whirlwind romance in Monaco, a naïve young woman journeys to her new husband’s lavish estate, only to find the staff still under the thrall of his recently deceased first wife — the impossibly beautiful, charming and charismatic Rebecca de Winter.

Much like Lily James’ unnamed narrator of “Rebecca” — Netflix’s adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel — director Ben Wheatley seems to feel the constant shadow of impossible expectation looming over him. After all, a 1940 take on the book (directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine) won the Academy Award for Best Picture and was recently inducted into the United States National Film Registry.




“Rebecca” is directed by Ben Wheatley. (Supplied)

Sadly, although Wheatley’s lavish period piece opts for a more faithful retelling of du Maurier’s novel than Hitchcock’s, the 2020 version of “Rebecca” has none of the sophistication, charm or simmering tension of its Oscar-winning predecessor. Lily James and Armie Hammer (as the supposedly suave Maxim de Winter) certainly look the part, but their blossoming relationship lacks substance and neither of their character arcs feels organic or believable. Indeed, only Kristen Scott Thomas (as the steely housekeeper Mrs Danvers) dazzles, dominating her scenes with equal parts charm and menace as she gradually reveals the depth of her fondness for Maxim’s first wife — and her disdain for his second.




A 1940 take on the book won the Academy Award for Best Picture and was recently inducted into the United States National Film Registry. (Supplied)

James lurches from waif-like innocence to purposeful would-be matriarch (and back) too quickly and too often to conjure any sense of growth as she delves into the story of what happened to Rebecca. Though Wheatley’s willingness to go darker with the story than Hitchcock is welcome, the feeble chemistry between his two lead actors makes the movie’s final third just a little too far-fetched to be immersive. This glossy retelling is, much like its two stars and setting, very handsome. However, much like its beleaguered narrator’s situation, the pressure of expectation is stifling.


Saudi vegan bodybuilder slams diet myths

Nutrition is the most important part when it comes to bodybuilding, then comes type of exercise, and good rest. (AFP)
Updated 29 November 2020

Saudi vegan bodybuilder slams diet myths

  • Ali Al-Salam, who stopped consuming animal products in 2017, says certain steps must be completed to have an athletic body

JEDDAH: The vegan diet has risen in popularity in Saudi Arabia in recent years and has been a constant topic of debate among Saudis, attracting the interest of many, including athletes.

Ongoing debates about whether the vegan diet is sufficient for normal people, let alone bodybuilders, abound, but one Saudi is answering them physically.
Veganism is a lifestyle that excludes all animal products from diets, clothing or any other purposes.
Over the years, a number of studies have found that people who eat vegan or vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease, but other studies have also placed them at a higher risk of stroke, possibly due to the lack of vitamin B12, an essential vitamin that reduces the risk of anemia and neurological diseases.
Speaking to Arab News, 33-year-old Saudi vegan bodybuilder, Ali Al-Salam, who first started his vegan diet three years ago when he was suffering from high blood pressure, highlighted that the consumption of animal products is a deep rooted idea among bodybuilders and athletes.
“We always hear that in order to build muscle, we must consume animal products. In some parts of the world, there are people who can only have a small amount of animal products yet they live their lives healthily and comfortably and are not suffering from malnutrition — on the contrary, they have a lower level of chronic illnesses.”

When I consumed meat and animal products, I suffered from high blood pressure; it was 190 over 110, and I wasn’t even 30 yet. Two weeks into the vegan diet, it went down to 150. The vegan diet did what couldn’t be done with medications for me.

Ali Al-Salam, Saudi vegan bodybuilder

He said it also opened his eyes to what goes on in the dairy and meat industry; he began researching in 2016 and decided to become vegan in 2017.
“I was just like every other athlete, I used to consume a high amounts of protein. I remember in the last days before turning vegan, I used to have 10 egg whites and a piece of steak for breakfast to fulfil my protein needs. This made me think, ‘is this the only way to consume protein?’ And from then on, I started researching and got introduced to the vegan diet at a larger scale,” he said.
“When I consumed meat and animal products, I suffered from high blood pressure; it was 190 over 110, and I wasn’t even 30 yet. Two weeks into the vegan diet, it went down to 150. The vegan diet did what couldn’t be done with medications for me.”
He explained that bodybuilding does not solely rely on protein, and that there are steps that must be completed in order to reach an athletic body. Nutrition is the most important part, then comes type of exercise, and good rest.
“When we talk about good nutrition, it does not just rely on protein. Yes, it is important, but the amount of calories in general is more important,” he said.
“Let’s say you needed 200 grams of protein, does that mean if you consumed 200 grams of it, you would gain muscle? No. You need all the basic nutrients to reach a certain amount of calories in general,” he added.
He highlighted that as soon as people register for gym memberships, they immediately look for supplements because they think they cannot reach the needed amount of protein.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Veganism is a lifestyle that excludes all animal products from diets, clothing or any other purposes.

• Over the years, a number of studies have found that people who eat vegan or vegetarian diets have a lower risk of heart disease.

• But other studies have also placed them at a higher risk of stroke, possibly due to the lack of vitamin B12, an essential vitamin that reduces the risk of anemia and neurological diseases.

• Vegan athletes have more endurance, strength and faster muscle recovery, because the vegan diet is rich in antioxidants.

• Animal products sometimes cause inflammation, that your body needs to recover from in the first place.

“I’m talking about non-vegans here too, where their protein intake is already high. Marketing plays a big role here. People link protein to animal products because our society grew up with this idea as well.
“Can a vegan build muscle? Yes, when they eat right, exercise correctly and rest well. The misconception about protein stems from amino acids. People think vegan food lacks amino acids, and only animal products are full of them and that is far from the truth,” he added.
When comparing vegan athletes to regular athletes, he said vegan athletes have more endurance, strength and faster muscle recovery, because the vegan diet is rich in antioxidants which helps greatly in recovery, and because “animal products sometimes cause inflammation, that your body needs to recover from in the first place.”