Tyson vows to keep fighting after Roy Jones match

Tyson, who looks in excellent shape on videos released on social media in recent months, vows that he is more focused than ever on the sport. (File/AFP)
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Updated 30 October 2020

Tyson vows to keep fighting after Roy Jones match

  • Tyson has not competed in a boxing match since his knockout loss to Kevin McBride in 2005
  • Tyson plans future matches as part of his newly formed sporting events company: Legends Only League

LONDON: The 54-year old former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson has vowed to keep fighting after his much-touted comeback fight against Roy Jones Jr. which is scheduled for Nov. 28 in Los Angeles.
Save for a single exhibition in 2006, Tyson has not competed in a boxing match since his knockout loss to Kevin McBride in 2005.

Tyson said during a press conference this week that he planned to keep fighting after his fight with Roy Jones Jr. later this month.

Tyson plans future matches as part of his newly formed sporting events company: Legends Only League and hinted at future opponents during a press conference organized by Triller to promote the event on Thursday.
"I'm going to go as long as the league is working," Tyson said. "I'm going to do this, and I'm going to help a lot of people, and my legacy is going to be that I gave a lot more than I took."

Tyson, who looks in excellent shape on videos released on social media in recent months, vows that he is more focused than ever on the sport. The proceeds of which will go to charity Tyson said.

Though no formal boxing title is on the line, the winner of the match will be given a special belt by the World Boxing Council in recognition of the accomplishment.
The Nov. 28 event will feature a mixture of both exhibitions and regular boxing matches. Of the latter, the most prominent will feature Gambian-Swedish light heavyweight champion, Badou Jack.
The fight was initially scheduled for Sept. 21 in Carson, California. In addition to a new date, the fight now has a new venue, the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Fans will have the option to watch the fight globally via the streaming service Triller, or through traditional methods. Currently, there are no plans to allow fans to attend the event due to the coronavirus.
Indeed, even as Tyson spoke from his home during the press conference, he wore a preventative facemask.
Other precautions are being taken due to the age of the two fighters in the main event. Tyson’s opponent the 51- year old Roy Jones Jr., last fought in 2018. The fight will be contested over eight two-minute rounds rather than the more traditional three-minute rounds.
"I'm sure they had their reasons, but the women fight two minutes," Tyson said. "But this is bigger than me, it's not all about me, so who am I to talk. I'm just happy that we're doing it."


Tokyo 2020 organizers estimate Games postponement cost $1.9bn

Updated 29 November 2020

Tokyo 2020 organizers estimate Games postponement cost $1.9bn

  • The International Olympic Committee and the Japanese government were forced to put off the Games for a year in March
  • The organizing committee will decide on a breakdown of the burden of the delay in December

TOKYO: This year’s postponement of the Tokyo Olympics because of the novel coronavirus cost about 200 billion yen ($1.9 billion) orgainsers have estimated, the Yomiuri newspaper reported on Sunday, citing people involved with the event.
The International Olympic Committee and the Japanese government were forced to put off the Games for a year in March as the coronavirus spread rapidly around the world.
The Games cost 1.35 trillion yen ($13 billion) before the postponement, the newspaper reported.
A spokesman for the organizers was not immediately available for comment.
The organizing committee will decide on a breakdown of the burden of the delay in December, after discussions between the committee, the Tokyo metropolitan government and the central government, the newspaper said.
The postponement costs include payment to staff as well as the introduction of new systems for refunding tickets but do not include measures against the spread of the coronavirus, the newspaper said.
The organizers had originally estimated that the delay would cost nearly 300 billion yen but they were able to reduce that figure by simplifying some events, the report said.