Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate

Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate
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Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan (L) and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani attend their meeting at the Presidential Palace in Kabul on November 19, 2020. (AFP)
Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate
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Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan (L) speaks during a joint press conference with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani (R) at the Presidential Palace in Kabul on November 19, 2020. (AFP)
Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate
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Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani (L) inspect a guard of honour ahead of their joint press conference at the Presidential Palace in Kabul on November 19, 2020. (AFP)
Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate
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Afghan President Ashraf Ghani (C) gestures to Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan (R) during a guard of honour ahead of their joint press conference at the Presidential Palace in Kabul on November 19, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 19 November 2020

Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate

Imran Khan visits Kabul amid peace talks stalemate
  • Khan’s one-day visit was his first trip to the Afghan capital since assuming office in 2018
  • Peace talks between the Taliban and the Afghan government began in September in Doha but have stalled

KABUL: Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan on Thursday arrived in Kabul to meet with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani amid stalled peace talks between the Afghanistan government and Taliban.

Khan’s one-day visit was his first trip to the Afghan capital since assuming office in 2018.

It is the highest-profile visit by a foreign official since peace talks began between the Taliban and the Afghan government in the Qatari capital of Doha in September and comes at a time when the negotiations have hit a stalemate and violence in Afghanistan is on the rise.

The Pakistani PM’s trip took place just days after the US administration decided to reduce its military presence in Afghanistan by January, ahead of a complete withdrawal of its forces next spring.

Many Afghan and US officials believe that Pakistan has influence over the Taliban and can convince their top leaders to move toward a cease-fire.

During a joint press conference at the presidential palace in Kabul, Ghani described the visit as “historic,” while Khan recalled the role Islamabad had played in persuading the Taliban to take part in intra-Afghan discussions.

“We are assuring you that we will do more than your expectation,” Khan said.

“The whole idea of coming at the time that violence is increasing here is to show you Mr. President that we, the people of Pakistan and the government of Pakistan, have only one concern what you are feeling. We want peace for the people of Afghanistan, who have suffered for the past four decades.”

Ghani’s spokesman, Sediq Seddiqi, told media after the conference that the two leaders had also discussed “mutual issues related to business, trade, economic cooperation, and security.”

The premier’s visit followed a new wave of mistrust between Kabul and Islamabad, after Afghanistan accused Pakistan of harboring Taliban leaders on its soil and supporting their cross-border attacks on Afghan and foreign troops.

Islamabad has always rejected the accusations and expressed concerns that India, who has lately forged close ties with Kabul, was using Afghanistan to undermine Pakistan’s security — claims India has always denied.

Khan had pointed out this concern during an Islamabad visit of Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, head of the Afghan National Council for Reconciliation and Afghanistan’s chief peace negotiator.

Ahmad Saeedi, a former Afghan diplomat in Pakistan, told Arab News that by making the trip to Kabul, Khan was trying to highlight to the world and the upcoming US administration of American President-elect Joe Biden that Pakistan was playing its part in the Afghan peace process and could “break the deadlock in Afghan peace talks.”

He said: “I think Pakistan can play an important role in the peace process if it wants when its concerns are addressed by Kabul. We know that as much as the Taliban are part of the problem, the government (Kabul) is too, and Pakistan has its influence.”


Germany wants broader Iran nuclear deal

Updated 59 min 42 sec ago

Germany wants broader Iran nuclear deal

Germany wants broader Iran nuclear deal
  • Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif has rejected talk of reopening the 2015 deal

BERLIN: Germany said Friday that a new broader Iran nuclear accord must be reached to also rein in Tehran’s ballistic missile program, warning that the 2015 deal was no longer enough.
“A form of ‘nuclear agreement plus’ is needed, which also lies in our interest,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, whose country currently holds the EU presidency, told Spiegel magazine in an interview.
“We have clear expectations for Iran: no nuclear weapons, but also no ballistic rocket program which threatens the whole region. Iran must also play another role in the region.”
“We need this accord because we distrust Iran,” he added.
The 2015 nuclear deal — known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA — gave Iran relief from sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear program.
The European Union and the United States were key signatories in the deal but US President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew from the accord in 2018 and has reimposed crippling sanctions on Tehran as part of a “maximum pressure” campaign.
President-elect Joe Biden has signalled that Washington could rejoin the deal as a starting point for follow-on negotiations if Iran returned to compliance.
But Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif has rejected talk of reopening the 2015 deal, saying on Thursday: “We will not renegotiate a deal which we negotiated.”
He added that Western powers should look to their own behavior before criticizing Iran.
He also complained at what he characterised as a lack of European outrage at the assassination of one of Iran’s leading nuclear scientists, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, outside Tehran last week — an attack Tehran has blamed on Israel.
Decades old US-Iranian tensions dramatically escalated after Trump walked out of the deal.
In recent months, alarm has also grown over Iran’s regional activities through proxies in Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Yemen, which the West says destabilizes the region.