Sheikh Hamdan leads the way as cyclists get freedom of Dubai

Sheikh Hamdan leads the way as cyclists get freedom of Dubai
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Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed, Crown Prince of Dubai, participates in the Dubai Ride Challenge on Friday, November 20, 2020. (Screengrab)
Sheikh Hamdan leads the way as cyclists get freedom of Dubai
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Sheikh Hamdan with other cyclists on Sheikh Zayed Road, Friday, November 20, 2020.(AFP)
Sheikh Hamdan leads the way as cyclists get freedom of Dubai
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The event began in the early hours of Friday, November 20, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 20 November 2020

Sheikh Hamdan leads the way as cyclists get freedom of Dubai

Sheikh Hamdan leads the way as cyclists get freedom of Dubai
  • Crown Prince said high participation in Dubai Ride 2020 reflected growing awareness about the importance of fitness and the benefits of sporting activities
  • 14km Sheikh Zayed Road route offered exhilarating experience of cycling among Dubai’s iconic landmarks including Emirates Towers, The Museum of the Future, and the DWTC

DUBAI: A section of Dubai’s main artery, the Sheikh Zayed Road, was transformed into a 14km cycling track for the very first time as part of Dubai Fitness Challenge 2020. More than 20,000 cyclists participated in the inaugural Dubai Ride 2020, marking a new milestone in their fitness journey.

Spearheaded by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Dubai Crown Prince and Chairman of The Executive Council of Dubai, the event saw cyclists hitting the roads as early as 5:00 am, embarking on two routes in the heart of the city — a 14km loop on Sheikh Zayed Road and a 4km family route around Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Boulevard.

The Crown Prince praised the exceptional community response, saying the high participation reflects growing awareness about the importance of fitness and the benefits of integrating sporting activities into one’s lifestyle. Sheikh Hamdan encouraged the community to explore simple ways to incorporate fitness activities into their daily routines, so that we can enhance our health, wellbeing and happiness. Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed expressed his appreciation for the efforts of the organizers, the support extended by stakeholders and the enthusiasm shown by participants, which combined to make the event a success.

Cycling enthusiasts were excited to ride the 14km Sheikh Zayed Road route with both directions of the highway opened exclusively for cyclists. International athletes, as well as the city’s leading cycling clubs and communities, joined the riders for a once-in-a-lifetime experience of cycling around Dubai’s iconic landmarks including Emirates Towers, The Museum of the Future, and the Dubai World Trade Center (DWTC).

Families and children as young as five enjoyed the 4km bike ride around Souk Al Bahar, Dubai Opera, The Dubai Fountain and Burj Khalifa. The event also featured high participation from people of determination, who joined the cycling tour around Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Boulevard.

The local stakeholder network extended overwhelming support to the Dubai Ride event, with public and private sectors rallying to contribute to realizing the city’s vision to embrace a healthier lifestyle. Government organizations, as well as schools and educational institutions joined participants in a socially distanced setting, testament to Dubai’s commitment to creating a safe environment for people to be physically active.

Dubai Ride was organized by Dubai Tourism and Dubai Sports Council; with presenting partner DP World; association partners Emirates NBD, Etisalat and Mai Dubai; official partners Arabian Radio Network (ARN), Daman, EMAAR, Shield ME and Talabat; and government partners Event Security Committee, Dubai Health Authority (DHA), Dubai Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA), Dubai Police, Ministry of Education and Roads & Transport Authority (RTA).

Dubai Fitness Challenge 2020 will continue until November 28. For more information on all events and activities, please visit www.dubaifitnesschallenge.com


Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

Updated 04 December 2020

Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

Palestinian singer Rasha Nahas discusses her long-delayed debut album

AMSTERDAM: In May 2019, life was looking good for Palestinian singer-songwriter Rasha Nahas. She had begun to establish herself in Berlin — having moved there from her hometown of Haifa in 2017; her debut album — wrapped in 2018 — was just weeks away from being released; and she had a prospective tour of the Middle East and Europe lined up. 

“I feel like a lot of exciting things are happening and hopefully the album will bring more,” she told me then. “I’m not in a hurry, but I’m going full-power with all of my will and passion.”

Fast-forward to today and that debut album is still just weeks away from release. Not long after we spoke last year, Nahas began to experience pain in her wrists and hands. It quickly became serious enough that she went to see a doctor who diagnosed her with repetitive strain injury. 

Her debut album (cover pictured) is just weeks away from release. Supplied

“It was really hardcore,” she says. “Both my hands and wrists had very, very bad inflammation. I couldn’t type emails or hold my phone or carry groceries and stuff. It was basically from overplaying. It had been a very busy time with shows and traveling, and a lot of stress. That was good, in some ways, because it meant things were happening for me, but the mental stress also wasn’t good for my body. I just had to stop everything, take a break and focus on getting better.”

Having psyched herself up for the release of her album, the necessary postponement — and cancellation of her tour plans — was something of a comedown. 

“Everything was a big frustration,” she says. “And I couldn’t really let that energy out in music, because I wasn’t able to (play).”

That last part, especially, was a huge blow to someone for whom music has been “a place of escape and expression and dealing with things and understanding myself” since her early teens and has become the thing from which she makes her living — an impressive feat for any artist, but particularly an independent musician from the Middle East. 

Nahas first picked up a guitar – which actually belonged to her sister – when she was a kid. Supplied

Nahas first picked up a guitar when she was a kid. It actually belonged to her sister, who “took a few lessons then stopped.” 

“I would tune it in very weird ways and strum it and sing out of tune,” she says. “Then I decided to study guitar. The only available option that my parents liked was classical music. So for nine years I did classical guitar and theory. I wanted to drop it (often), but I’m glad I didn’t.”

Music was popular in the Nahas household — from classic Arab artists including Fayrouz (“My mother’s a big fan”) to Western artists. Nahas chose to listen mostly to the latter. “We had a massive collection of CDs in the car and every Saturday we’d drive to the Galilee with the windows open and very fresh air and listen to John Lennon. That’s my main memory of music from my childhood,” she says. As a teenager she branched out into hard rock, pop, jazz and more. Oh, and Avril Lavigne (“That’s a bit embarrassing now,” she admits). 

Music was popular in the Nahas household — from classic Arab artists to Western artists. Supplied

She estimates she wrote her first original song around the age of 15. “It probably sounded like a normal indie-rock song, but I think the (lyrical) content was quite different,” she says. “It was about life as a Palestinian girl understanding her identity, and asking questions — about the political situation too. Looking at it now, I think, ‘Woah! That’s what I was dealing with at the age of 15?’”

It took a few years before she felt she was developing her own identity as an artist, though. She played her first gig as she finished high school, aged 18, by which time she had about an hour’s worth of original material. 

It makes sense that Nahas had classical training and listened to a wide variety of genres growing up — and that she composes music for the theater professionally. Her songs, and particularly her vocal delivery, have a definite theatrical vibe, and there are hints of several influences — pop, indie rock, jazz, rockabilly, surrealism, punk, spoken-word, and more. The result is something that seems entirely organic and entirely honest. It’s not necessarily easily accessible, but it’s certainly some of the most interesting work you’ll hear from a contemporary Middle Eastern artist, at least in the English language. 

A still from the “Desert” music video. Supplied

The two singles released from the album so far — “The Clown” and title track “Desert” — are good examples; both showcasing her distinctive style. The former was written a month after Nahas moved to Berlin, aged 21 (because “I just needed to be away, make music and take time to just be and understand things”). “It came from a few days of thoughts that were gathering and piling up — about being away from home, about artists getting on stage and getting labeled as Palestinian or as Israeli, about the political situation that never really leaves you.”

The latter, released in November, was written around the same time. “It’s a very personal song talking about searching and the things that are changing around us,” Nahas explains. “In the video (shot in Haifa), we played a lot with metaphors and images — we have kids with guns, we have a dancer crucified on an olive tree to symbolize the ties to the land. We have an old, abandoned building in Haifa contrasted with the big glass buildings to ask ourselves where our identity — as Palestinian 48ers — fits between tradition and modern colonialism.”

“The Clown” is the first single from her debut album. Supplied

The search for identity is a central theme of Nahas’ debut album, which will finally see the light of day on January 29. “It was very influenced by the relocation from Palestine to Germany,” she says. “So it deals with questions of identity and of what our responsibility to our identity is. I come from this place that has a certain political weight, traditionally. So how do I deal with that weight? How do I sing about it? Who am I in it?”

The end to the record’s long delay will doubtless come as a huge relief to Nahas, after what she describes as “one of the heaviest years for me.” Her almost-complete recovery from injury all but coincided with the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the year also included the death of a close friend — one of the dancers in the “Desert” video. 

The search for identity is a central theme of Nahas’ debut album, which will finally see the light of day on January 29. Supplied

“That challenged my relationship with the (record). He was part of the creation, in a way. And the release was postponed because of the injury and the pandemic. I wished it had been finished and that he could have seen it, because he really put everything into it. So it just added another layer to everything.”

That heavy year hasn’t been entirely without positives though, she stresses. “Even though it’s been very unsettling, with my injury and the pandemic, it did ground something in me. It forced me to look inward more, but also to look at what’s around me and appreciate it and grow from it.”

She played her first gig as she finished high school, aged 18, by which time she had about an hour’s worth of original material. Supplied

Given the years between the album’s completion and release, I wonder if Nahas still feels as connected to the work. Her answer is a definite yes. 

“It captures a period in my life that I needed to capture and I’m really happy I did that. The songs came from a very honest place. That’s the most important thing — I feel like that doesn’t get old,” she says. “ So, it doesn’t matter when it comes out, because it’s real and it’s truthful — and I’m sure that will be reflected in the interaction with the people who are going to listen to it.”