Spurs sink Manchester City 2-0

Spurs sink Manchester City 2-0
Chelsea's French striker Olivier Giroud shoots but fails to score during Saturday’s English Premier League match against Newcastle United. (AFP)
Short Url
Updated 22 November 2020

Spurs sink Manchester City 2-0

Spurs sink Manchester City 2-0
  • Tottenham power to top of Premier League with impressive win against Guardiola’s team

LONDON: Tottenham powered to the top of the Premier League with an impressive 2-0 win against Manchester City, while Chelsea are up to second place after their victory at Newcastle on Saturday.

Jose Mourinho’s side are two points clear of Chelsea thanks to goals from Son Heung-min and Giovani Lo Celso at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium.

Tottenham took the lead after five minutes as South Korean forward Son ran onto Tanguy Ndombele’s lofted pass, beat the City offside trap and slotted a cool finish under Ederson.

It was Son’s ninth league goal this season and his 11th in all competitions.

City dominated possession after Son’s goal and thought they had equalized in the 27th minute when Aymeric Laporte fired home.

But Gabriel Jesus controlled Rodri’s cross with his arm before setting up Laporte and the goal was disallowed after referee Mike Dean consulted the pitchside monitor.

Lo Celso came off the bench to score with his first touch just 35 seconds after his introduction.

The Argentine midfielder netted his first Premier League goal in the 65th minute, driving his shot past Ederson after Harry Kane’s sublime pass prised open the City defense.

On the one-year anniversary of Mourinho’s appointment, Tottenham are unbeaten in their last eight league games since losing to Everton on the opening weekend of the season.

Mourinho’s team are on a four-match winning run in the league and have been transformed into genuine title contenders just months after finishing outside the top four last term.

“The players gave everything and followed a strategy. They were amazing. Harry Kane represents the spirit of the team, and all the other guys are the same. They all want to do it,” Mourinho said.

“We found a way to play and it was magnificent to see them play how they did.”

Tottenham, who last won the top-flight title in 1961 and haven’t lifted a major trophy since 2008, would surrender pole position if Leicester beat champions Liverpool at Anfield on Sunday.

City are languishing in 10th place, eight points behind the leaders after their first defeat in 10 games in all competitions.

Pep Guardiola’s timid side look a shadow of the swaggering outfit that won successive league titles in 2018 and 2019.

Twelve points from eight games is City’s lowest total at this stage of a Premier League campaign since 2008-09.

“It could be better. We played similar to how we have all season. We did not defend good for the first goal,” Guardiola said.

“We had more chances than them but we lost. Mourinho’s teams are like this, you make a mistake and they punish you on the counter attack.”

Next weekend, Tottenham face a fascinating clash with London rivals Chelsea, who maintained their fine form as Federico Fernandez’s first-half own goal and Tammy Abraham’s strike sealed a 2-0 win at St. James’ Park.

Frank Lampard’s side are unbeaten in nine games in all competitions and have not lost in their last six league matches.

With five clean sheets in their last six outings in all competitions, Chelsea’s third successive league victory was the perfect way to start a hectic period leading up to Christmas.

Chelsea’s pressure was rewarded in the 10th minute when Mason Mount whipped in a low cross and Fernandez turned it into his own net under pressure from Ben Chilwell.

Chelsea put the result beyond doubt in the 65th minute when Timo Werner accelerated away from the Newcastle defense and slipped a pass to Abraham, who guided his shot in off the post.

“It’s not an easy game. We played well in patches and the result is key in these games,” Lampard said.

“I won’t get excited about being top of the table for five minutes. It’s important to be humble and know it’s a long race.”

Brighton’s 2-1 success at Aston Villa ended a run of seven games without a win in all competitions.

Graham Potter’s side took the lead through Danny Welbeck before Ezri Konsa’s equalizer for Villa.

Solly March put Brighton back in front, but Albion defender Tariq Lamptey was sent off for a foul on Jack Grealish in stoppage-time.

Villa were controversially denied a penalty in the final seconds when Michael Oliver gave a spot-kick for March’s challenge on Trezeguet, only for the referee to change his mind after consulting the pitchside monitor.


Postponed Tokyo Olympics to cost extra $2.4bn

Updated 04 December 2020

Postponed Tokyo Olympics to cost extra $2.4bn

Postponed Tokyo Olympics to cost extra $2.4bn
  • The extra costs come as officials work to build enthusiasm for the first Games postponed in peacetime,
  • Tokyo 2020 said an additional $1.5 billion would be needed for operational costs related to the delay

TOKYO: The coronavirus-delayed Tokyo Olympics will cost at least an extra $2.4 billion, organizers said Friday, with the unprecedented postponement and a raft of pandemic health measures ballooning an already outsized budget.
The extra costs come as officials work to build enthusiasm for the first Games postponed in peacetime, insisting the massive event can go ahead next year even if the pandemic is not under control.
But more spending, on top of the previous budget of about $13 billion, could further harden public opinion in Japan, where polls this year showed a majority of people think the Games should be postponed again or canceled together.
“Whether it’s seen as too much or that we have done well to contain the costs, I think it depends on how you look at it,” Tokyo 2020 CEO Toshiro Muto told reporters.
“We have done all we can to earn the public’s understanding,” he added.
Tokyo 2020 said an additional $1.5 billion would be needed for operational costs related to the delay, with another $900 million in spending on coronavirus countermeasures.
The dollar figures are calculated at an exchange rate of 107 yen, and the total is around $2.56 billion at today’s rate. The costs look set to rise further, with Tokyo 2020 saying it would also release an additional $250 million in “contingency” funds.

The new spending swells a budget that was set last year at around $13 billion, and will add to disquiet about the cost of the Games after an audit report last year argued the national government was spending significantly more than originally planned.
The extra costs will be split between Tokyo, the organizing committee and the national government. The International Olympic Committee will not be chipping in, but has agreed to waive its sponsor royalty fee for the first time, organizers said.
The unprecedented decision to delay the Games has thrown up a plethora of extra costs, from rebooking venues and transport to retaining the huge organizing committee staff.
And with organizers committed to hosting the Games even if the pandemic remains a threat, extensive safety measures will be needed.
Tokyo 2020 this week released a 54-page plan they said would make it possible to hold the Games, including restrictions on athletes touching and fans cheering, and an infection control center in the Olympic Village.
Organizers have tried to scale back elements of the Games, offering fewer free tickets, scrapping athlete welcome ceremonies and making savings on mascots, banners and meals, but so far they have cut just $280 million in spending.
And on Thursday, they said 18 percent of Olympic tickets sold in Japan will be refunded, with domestic fans demanding their money back on about 810,000 of the 4.45 million tickets sold in the country.


Organizers hope to now resell those tickets, and demand for seats at the Games was high before the pandemic.
But enthusiasm has since waned, with a poll in July revealing that just one in four people wanted to see the event held in 2021, and most backing either further delay or cancelation.
Tokyo 2020 President Yoshiro Mori said the spending plan was carefully considered and he hoped people would accept it.
“If you have a drink, you could say your glass is half-full, or half empty. It depends on how you look at it,” he told reporters.
“There’s a rationale behind this plan. I hope the Japanese people will understand it.”
Tokyo 2020’s final price tag has been hotly disputed, with an audit report last year estimating the national government spent nearly 10 times its original budget between 2013-2018.
Organizers countered that the estimate included items not directly related to the Games.