Handwriting is the mirror of one’s personality, says expert as Graphology gains attention in KSA

Handwriting is the mirror of one’s personality, says expert as Graphology gains attention in KSA
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Saman Aslam
Handwriting is the mirror of one’s personality, says expert as Graphology gains attention in KSA
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Graphology has not only allowed Saman Aslam to help those around her, but also helped to improve herself. (Supplied)
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Updated 26 November 2020

Handwriting is the mirror of one’s personality, says expert as Graphology gains attention in KSA

Handwriting is the mirror of one’s personality, says expert as Graphology gains attention in KSA
  • Graphology is a field that is witnessing increasing attention from young Saudis

JEDDAH: Self-assessment is one of the growing trends among young Saudis from analyzing one’s art, body language, to handwriting, among other things.

As much as handwriting plays an important part in the academic life of a person, it can also tell of one’s personality traits, habits, and medical conditions through a science called graphology.

Graphology is the analysis of the patterns found in the handwriting to identify the psychological state of the person.

Arab News caught up with graphologist Saman Aslam, a Pakistani expat residing in Riyadh, who said that graphology is growing among youngsters. She set up an Instagram page for clients who wish to have their handwriting read for free.

Speaking of the science itself, she said that graphology has been the most challenging thing that she has done in her life. “I’ve done various jobs but being a graphologist is the most challenging yet and an amazing one.”

She defined a person’s handwriting as “brain-writing” as it is the brain that guides the hands and creates patterns. “Handwriting is our mirror; it projects our conscious, preconscious, and subconscious mind. It shows a person’s physical health as well.”

According to Aslam, appearances can be deceptive but handwriting never lies, revealing how the writer thinks, feels, and behaves. “It does so directly and immediately, without them even being present. It shows the motivation that lies behind actions and outlines the writer’s propensity to behave in ways that may not be expected.”

She also cleared up a common misconception related to this particular field, which is often confused with fortune telling or spiritual studies: Graphology cannot predict the future.

Aslam’s interest in graphology stems from her experience in learning Arabic writing, where a team of Arabic graphologists told her some of her personality traits that awoke her interest for the field. She later studied English handwriting.

HIGHLIGHTS

• According to Aslam, appearances can be deceptive but handwriting never lies, revealing how the writer thinks, feels, and behaves.

• She defined a person’s handwriting as ‘brain-writing’ as it is the brain that guides the hands and creates patterns.

• She also cleared up a common misconception related to this particular field, which is often confused with fortune telling or spiritual studies: Graphology cannot predict the future.

Graphology has not only allowed Aslam to help those around her, but also helped her improve her own personality and relationships.

“Every day I learn and implement new techniques. From understanding my siblings to my students’ personalities, knowing what my seniors are expecting from me to helping my friends in finding suitable life partners, and advising people regarding their careers and health checkups,” she told Arab News.

She has also become a good observer and is able to spot those who cannot express what they are going through, and now she can get along with difficult personalities.

Graphology doesn’t stop at analysis, she added — there is a way that people can improve and reform their negative traits to positive ones, through a process called “graphotherapy.”

The therapy is based on changing the personality of the person by changing their handwriting. A graphotherapist designs a customized therapy and suggests new handwriting patterns to reprogram the negative habits. It can supposedly help alleviate medical ailments, relationships, careers, self-development, mental stress, and traumas, as well as suicidal thoughts.

“With graphotherapy, you can overcome your weaknesses and transform them into your strengths,” she said.

Graphology, Aslam noted, not only works with finding out mental health issues, but physical ones as well. This branch of graphology is called graphopathology and it studies the alterations produced in graphisms due to psychological or physical disturbances whether they are latent or evident, permanent, or temporary.

“Apparently, many health issues are registered in our brain six months prior to showing the symptoms,” she said. “Health issues such as tumors, hormonal imbalances, gynecological issues, joint pain, dehydration, and a lot more.”

In her career as a graphologist, Aslam has had numerous experiences, but some stood out more than others. “One such experience was curing my patient’s backache. The other incident was when my patient had her husband’s handwriting analysis done, and he turned out to be suffering from a dual personality disorder. One of his characters was celestial and the other was hostile.”

Aslam wants to raise awareness through workshops, conducting short courses, and launch an online academy that incorporates graphology and graphotherapy.

She also encouraged aspiring graphologists to work hard on their career. “Graphology comes with great responsibility; make sure you do it sincerely because your words are going to engrave someone’s soul. Be gracious! You are probably going to invest your entire life in this study; do it with dedication and veracity.”


First phase Saudi Arabia’s ‘Pulse of Alkhobar’ project launched

First phase Saudi Arabia’s ‘Pulse of Alkhobar’ project launched
Updated 22 January 2021

First phase Saudi Arabia’s ‘Pulse of Alkhobar’ project launched

First phase Saudi Arabia’s ‘Pulse of Alkhobar’ project launched
  • The project will help define the region’s culture and enhance its position as a tourist destination

RIYADH: The first phase of the “Pulse of Alkhobar” project has been launched as part of plans to develop an integrated cultural center in the heart of the city and transform the Eastern Province’s arts scene.
The project follows calls by architecture experts, social media activists and artists for a collaboration across multiple sectors to strengthen the province’s cultural impact.
According to Culture Minister Prince Badr bin Abudllah bin Farhan, the project, centered on the site of the city’s old market, is the fruit of a partnership between the ministry and its municipal and rural affairs counterpart.
Acting Minister of Municipal and Rural Affairs Majid Al-Hogail said that the project will build an artistic and heritage destination that will improve the lives of residents of Alkhobar governorate as well as visitors to the Eastern Province.
The project will help define the region’s culture and enhance its position as a tourist destination, he added.
Abdulhadi Al-Shammari, the province’s municipal chairman, told Arab News that the new project will also improve services at municipal facilities, while preserving Saudi heritage and culture.
The project introduces tourists and visitors to the culture of the province, and highlights Al-Olaya district as the center of the city’s culture and arts activities.
Al-Shammari said that the project will boost the city’s finances, driving sustainable development and growth as well an improvement in quality of life.
“It will create new investment opportunities for the private sector, and encourage small and medium-scale enterprises, which have an excellent and effective social impact,” he said.
Al-Shammari added: “The Saudi government supports all sectors to help them deliver lucrative investment opportunities and build a conducive environment for local and foreign investment, where new job opportunities are created for young men and women.”
Faisal Al-Fadl, secretary-general of the Saudi Green Building Forum, told Arab News that creating a cultural and arts destination that is open to a range of activities will add to the city’s tourist appeal.

HIGHLIGHTS

• The ‘Pulse of Alkhobar’ project follows calls by architecture experts, social media activists and artists for a collaboration across multiple sectors to strengthen the province’s cultural impact.

• According to Culture Minister Prince Badr bin Abudllah bin Farhan, the project, centered on the site of the city’s old market, is the fruit of a partnership between the ministry and its municipal and rural affairs counterpart.

“Cooperation between the public sector and international organizations, as well as professional organizations, archaeologists and the public, is instrumental in preserving the cultural and architectural heritage of neighborhoods and cities,” he said.
Al-Fadl added that the collaboration between the two ministries reflects “the importance of architectural and cultural heritage, and the tangible and unique archaeological importance of the buildings as a key element in the history of peoples and relationships inside and outside the Arabian Peninsula.”
He thanked both ministries for their efforts.
Arafat Al-Majed, a Qatif Muncipal Council member, said the partnership is a step forward that falls in line with agreements concluded as part of Vision 2030.
“The agreement will increase interest in cultural heritage and the buildings and towns whose profound and ancient history should be brought out to the world to see and enjoy,” she told Arab News. “The agreement will also improve the urban landscape.”
She said that the joint committee should have branches in municipalities around the Kingdom in order to shed light on heritage sites that can be included in UNESCO. “The Kingdom is rich in such heritage sites.”
Al-Majed said that the project will introduce today’s generation to the ancient heritage of the province in a way that encourages investment opportunities.
“Nobody can deny the fact that some municipalities are still hesitant about what to do with heritage buildings and towns since some of these are abandoned or about to collapse. These municipalities want to tear them down. But these are historical treasures that should be preserved and invested in to become an important economic driver, and a source of arts and culture,” she added.
Maysoon Abu Baker, a Saudi poet and columnist, said the Saudi government attaches great importance to culture and heritage.
“Vision 2030 emphasized the significance of the culture existent in old cities,” she told Arab News.
“Arts, culture and heritage are at the top of the agenda for developing cities and preserving their culture. The cultural impact is important for the future of the Kingdom and is related to its history.”
Yousef Al-Harbi, director of Culture and Arts Society in Dammam, said that the partnership will lead to “new visual perceptions highlighting the Saudi, Arabian and Islamic identity.”
He highlighted the importance of nurturing Saudi art and architectural talent, and facilitating cooperation in order to “bring out the beauty of Saudi heritage and cities.”