Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack

Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack
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Travelers wait at the airport of Yemen's southern city of Aden on January 3, 2021, as activity resumes after explosions rocked the building on December 30, killing or injuring dozens of people. (AFP)
Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack
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A man walks to the airport building in Yemen's city of Aden on January 3, 2021, as activity resumes after explosions rocked the building on December 30, killing or injuring dozens of people. (AFP)
Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack
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Passport control staff wait at their stations at the airport in Yemen's southern city of Aden on January 3, 2021, as activity resumes after explosions rocked the building on December 30, killing or injuring dozens of people. (AFP)
Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack
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A firefighting vehicle is stationed on the tarmac of the airport of Yemen's southern city of Aden on January 3, 2021, as activity resumes after explosions rocked the building on December 30, killing or injuring dozens of people. (AFP)
Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack
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People stand outside of the airport building in Yemen's southern city of Aden on January 3, 2021, as activity resumes after explosions rocked the building on December 30, killing or injuring dozens of people. (AFP)
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Updated 04 January 2021

Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack

Aden airport reopens as governor demands probe into attack
  • On Sunday, the airport received a Yemenia airline flight arriving from Sudan’s capital Khartoum
  • Yemen’s interior minister and the governor of Aden were at the airport to receive the flight

AL-MUKALLA: Yemen’s Aden airport reopened on Sunday, days after a deadly Houthi missile attack killed more than 25 people and brought operations to a halt, officials and media said.
National carrier Yemenia said on Sunday that it was resuming flights to Aden. A plane coming from Khartoum landed at the airport, even as workers were retrieving debris and fixing the damage caused by the attack.
Aden Gov. Ahmed Hamid Lamlis said the airport would remain a “symbol of peace” and renewed calls for an international investigation into the airport attack, the official Saba news agency reported.
“We reiterate that Aden is strong and seeks peace,” he said at a ceremony to celebrate the airport’s reopening. “This is our message to the international community and we call (on) it to investigate this crime.”
The governor, the commander of the Arab coalition in Aden, Brig. Gen. Nayef Al-Otaibi, and senior government officials released white doves as peace signs.
Yemen’s new Prime Minister Maeen Abdul Malik Saeed and several government officials accused the Iran-backed Houthis and military experts from Iran of staging the airport attack. They called for an international investigation and branded the Houthi militia a terrorist group.

BACKGROUND

• Yemen’s new PM accused the Iran-backed Houthis and military experts from Iran of staging the airport attack.

• They called for an international investigation and branded the Houthi militia a terrorist group.

• Yemen’s Defense Ministry said on Saturday that at least 9,328 Houthi fighters were killed in 2020 in fighting with government forces or in Arab coalition airstrikes.

Yemen’s Defense Ministry said on Saturday that at least 9,328 Houthi fighters, including 688 officers with different military rankings, were killed in 2020 in fighting with government forces or in Arab coalition airstrikes.
The highest number of Houthi deaths was recorded in October and August when 1,220 and 700 rebels were killed.
The ministry also said that coalition warplanes and army troops had destroyed 27 arms and ammunition depots and 573 vehicles belonging to the Houthis. The army and allied tribesmen had shot down 104 explosive-laden drones fired by the militia in 12 months.
The war in Yemen began in late 2014, when the Houthis stormed Sanaa and expanded their military footprint across the country. 
A coalition led by Saudi Arabia intervened in support of the internationally recognized President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi and managed to put an end to the Houthi military expansion.
It also helped government forces to take the offensive on the battlefields.


Death toll now 130 in tribal conflict in Darfur

Death toll now 130 in tribal conflict in Darfur
Updated 19 January 2021

Death toll now 130 in tribal conflict in Darfur

Death toll now 130 in tribal conflict in Darfur

JEDDAH: The death toll in a new tribal conflict in Sudan rose to 130 on Monday as clashes in West Darfur spread south.
At least 47 people were killed in South Darfur after 83 died and tens of thousands were displaced in West Darfur in the previous two days. It was the worst violence since a peace agreement last October raised hopes of an end to years of war.
Sudan has been undergoing a fragile transition since the removal from power of dictator Omar Bashir in April 2019 after mass protests against his rule.
The new bloodshed followed the end of the joint UN-African Union peacekeeping mission in Darfur on Dec. 31.
The aid group Save the Children warned: “In the chaos, we fear many children will have been separated from their parents, and will now be at risk of exploitation.” Its Sudan country director Arshad Malik said the many wounded had overwhelmed health centers, and injured and dying people were lying on the floors and corridors of hospitals.
“We call on all parties to the violence in West Darfur to lay down their arms immediately, before the situation gets out of control,” he said.
Authorities in Khartoum said they had sent a delegation to contain the situation. The UN secretary-general’s spokesman Stephane Dujarric urged them to “bring an end to the fighting.”