First Philippine eagle bred in captivity dies

First Philippine eagle bred in captivity dies
Pag-asa died Wednesday from infections associated with diseases trichomoniasis and aspergillosis. (AFP)
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Updated 08 January 2021

First Philippine eagle bred in captivity dies

First Philippine eagle bred in captivity dies
  • The raptor named ‘Pag-asa’ or ‘Hope’ was hatched in 1992
  • ‘Pag-asa was gone too soon indeed, but his legacy lives on’

MANILA: The first Philippine eagle bred in captivity in an effort to save one of the world’s most endangered birds has died from infections, conservationists said Friday.
The raptor named “Pag-asa” or “Hope” was hatched in 1992 at a sanctuary run by the Philippine Eagle Foundation on the outskirts of the southern city of Davao.
Pag-asa would have turned 29 next week.
The Philippines’ national bird, known for its elongated nape feathers that form into a shaggy crest, has seen its population devastated by the destruction of rainforests and hunting in the archipelago.
The center has spent decades trying to ensure the survival of the critically endangered bird through a breeding program and rehabilitating wounded raptors brought in from the wild.
Only around 800 are believed to be left in the wild, the center’s spokeswoman, Nelizza Marzo, said.
Pag-asa died Wednesday from infections associated with diseases trichomoniasis and aspergillosis, which the center said were fatal in raptors.
“Although treatment was done over a week ago, he continued to deteriorate and died,” it said in a statement.
The center has 33 Philippine eagles in its care. They can live for more than 40 years in captivity.
The eagles are notoriously hard to pair, with the larger female known to attack and even kill an unwanted suitor in the wild.
In more than three decades, the center has managed to breed 28 eaglets.
Seven of them were through artificial insemination, including Pag-asa and his only offspring Mabuhay. The rest were bred through natural pairing.
The raptor, whose wingspan can reach more than two meters (seven feet), is endemic to the Philippines. Killing or wounding the species incurs a jail sentence and fine.
The successful breeding of Pag-asa using artificial insemination had “heralded hope for the critically endangered species,” the center said.
“Even after he retired from breeding, Pag-asa lived his life as an icon of hope for Filipinos, young and old, and was a constant inspiration to the people working tirelessly to save our National Bird from extinction,” the spokeswoman said.
“Pag-asa was gone too soon indeed, but his legacy lives on.”


TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps
Updated 18 January 2021

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps

TWITTER POLL: Signal is more comfortable to use versus other instant messaging apps
  • Facebook-owned WhatsApp badly hit by a backlash after updating its privacy policy

DUBAI: Signal is more comfortable instant messaging service to use compared with other apps such as WhatsApp or Telegram, according to half of those who responded to an Arab News poll.

Signal’s surge in popularity among smartphone users, thanks to a two-word tweet from technology entrepreneur Elon Musk endorsing the encrypted messaging service, clearly showed as 50 percent of the 1,451 respondents expressed contentment with it.

Facebook-owned WhatsApp, badly hit by a backlash after updating its privacy policy, got a thumbs-up from three out of 10 poll respondents while Telegram had about a tenth of supporters. The remaining 10 percent of Arab New readers who responded to the poll meanwhile said none of the three instant messaging apps were comfortable to use.

 

 

Musk earlier urged users to “Use Signal” after WhatsApp, the most popular instant messaging app, was accused of forcing subscribers to share their personal data with its parent company Facebook for advertising.

Users had to accept these new terms before February 8, otherwise their accounts will be deleted. The ensuing furor prompted WhatsApp to delay its take it or leave it privacy update until May.

It likewise came out with a clarification the privacy changes were focused on how businesses used the app.

“We want to be clear that the policy update does not affect the privacy of your messages with friends or family in any way,” WhatsApp said in a statement.

“Instead, this update includes changes related to messaging a business on WhatsApp, which is optional, and provides further transparency about how we collect and use data.”