What We Are Reading Today: Icebound by Andrea Pitzer

What We Are Reading Today: Icebound by Andrea Pitzer
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Updated 09 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Icebound by Andrea Pitzer

What We Are Reading Today: Icebound by Andrea Pitzer

Icebound is a page-turner of an Arctic adventure/survival story, with vivid descriptions of the land, sea, and, most of all, the endless crushing ice.
In her new book, journalist Andrea Pitzer chronicles Barents’s three attempts to find a mythical passage to Asia.
“As part of her research for the book, Pitzer joined three Arctic expeditions between 2018 and 2020, including two sailing trips retracing William Barents’ voyages,” Rachel Slade said in a review for The New York Times.
“Pitzer also had access to enviable sources to reconstruct the story, including Barents’s own ship’s log; the journals of Jan Huygen van Linschoten — a cartographer who published Portuguese trade-route secrets he had memorized while serving in India; and the diary of the ship’s officer Gerrit de Veer, who accompanied Barents and perished on the way home during the third expedition,” Slade added.
“For the 21st-century reader who has seen one too many photos of emaciated polar bears loping across melting permafrost, Icebound can read a little like paradise really, really lost.”


What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo
Updated 16 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

From the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race, a history of white male America and a scathing indictment of what it has cost us.
After the election of Donald Trump, and the escalation of white male rage and increased hostility toward immigrants that came with him, New York Times-bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo found herself in conversation with Americans around the country, pondering one central question: How did we get here?
Oluo answers that question by pinpointing white men’s deliberate efforts to subvert women, people of color, and the disenfranchised. Through research and interviews, Oluo investigates the backstory of America’s growth, from immigrant migration to our national ethos around ingenuity, from the shaping of economic policy to the protection of sociopolitical movements that fortify male power. In the end, she shows how white men have long maintained a stranglehold on leadership and sorely undermined the pursuit of happiness for all, according to a review at goodreads.com.