Marvel superheroes return in quirky black-and-white sitcom

Marvel superheroes return in quirky black-and-white sitcom
American actress Elizabeth Olsen stars as witch Wanda Maximoff. (AFP)
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Updated 13 January 2021

Marvel superheroes return in quirky black-and-white sitcom

Marvel superheroes return in quirky black-and-white sitcom

LOS ANGELES: When the Marvel superhero movies reached their box office-shattering climax in 2019, nobody could have predicted the saga’s next installment would be a kitsch, black-and-white TV sitcom called “WandaVision.”

Making its debut on Jan.15 on Disney+, “WandaVision” stars witch Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen), and other-worldly android Vision (Paul Bettany), two B-list superheroes who struck up an unlikely but fan-favorite romance across several recent Marvel films.

“WandaVision” finds them — without explanation — living happily married in the idyllic 1950s town of Westview, which is seemingly lifted straight from an episode of “Bewitched” or “I Love Lucy.”

They still have superpowers, but have traded battles with genocidal villains for a cozy world of school fundraisers, neighborhood watch meetings and anniversary dinners.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo
Updated 16 January 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

What We Are Reading Today: Mediocre by Ijeoma Oluo

From the author of the New York Times bestseller So You Want to Talk About Race, a history of white male America and a scathing indictment of what it has cost us.
After the election of Donald Trump, and the escalation of white male rage and increased hostility toward immigrants that came with him, New York Times-bestselling author Ijeoma Oluo found herself in conversation with Americans around the country, pondering one central question: How did we get here?
Oluo answers that question by pinpointing white men’s deliberate efforts to subvert women, people of color, and the disenfranchised. Through research and interviews, Oluo investigates the backstory of America’s growth, from immigrant migration to our national ethos around ingenuity, from the shaping of economic policy to the protection of sociopolitical movements that fortify male power. In the end, she shows how white men have long maintained a stranglehold on leadership and sorely undermined the pursuit of happiness for all, according to a review at goodreads.com.