Middle East’s creative economy to reap rewards of heavy culture spending

A close up architectural shot of a Qasr Al Hosn arch, showcasing the corridors of the attraction and the iconic tower, illuminated by bright lights during the night time. (Supplied)
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A close up architectural shot of a Qasr Al Hosn arch, showcasing the corridors of the attraction and the iconic tower, illuminated by bright lights during the night time. (Supplied)
Saadiyat Cultural District in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)
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Saadiyat Cultural District in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)
UAE’s Zayed National Museum. (Supplied)
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UAE’s Zayed National Museum. (Supplied)
A South Korean dance troupe performs at the museum’s opening in 2017.  (Supplied)
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A South Korean dance troupe performs at the museum’s opening in 2017. (Supplied)
Etihad Arena in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)
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Etihad Arena in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)
​  A statue of Gudea dating back to 2150 B.C. at the Louvre Abu Dhabi. (AFP)  ​
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​ A statue of Gudea dating back to 2150 B.C. at the Louvre Abu Dhabi. (AFP) ​
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Updated 04 July 2021

Middle East’s creative economy to reap rewards of heavy culture spending

Middle East’s creative economy to reap rewards of heavy culture spending
  • Some states have kept investing in arts, culture and heritage through the pandemic despite financial pressures
  • Cultural and creative industries generate global annual revenues of $2,250 billion, according to UNESCO

DUBAI: Given the financial pressures of the past 18 months, few would expect a hefty investment in the arts and culture to be high on any government’s agenda. And yet, as economies emerge from the pandemic gloom, several Arab countries are pouring billions of dollars into the creative economy — art galleries, heritage sites and museums — to entice visitors and reinvigorate long-term growth.

UNESCO says cultural and creative industries are among the fastest-growing sectors in the world, delivering annual revenues of $2,250 billion, generating 30 million jobs and contributing roughly 10 percent to global gross domestic product (GDP).

Recognizing the sector’s potential, the UN designated 2021 as the International Year of the Creative Economy for Sustainable Development.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Egypt are prominent among the countries investing in cultural megaprojects with the goal of diversifying their future revenue streams and benefiting from other positive impacts: celebrating rich natural beauty and heritage; educating young populations; and attracting international brands and visitors.

 

As in the rest of the world, the Middle East’s creative economy sectors have been particularly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. But here too, public response to the crisis has underscored the importance of creativity and culture in supporting community resilience.

In Saudi Arabia, spending on cultural projects has been ongoing for several years. Most recently, the Kingdom has doubled down on its landmark Diriyah Gate project — a culture and leisure complex in the historic heart of Riyadh — which sets out to rival the pyramids of Egypt and the Colosseum of Rome.

Jerry Inzerillo, CEO of the Diriyah Gate Development Authority, told Arab News in June that his budget had been increased from $20 billion to $40 billion. The move to expand the project’s budget and scope was the brainchild of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Inzerillo said on the “Frankly Speaking” show.

Diriyah was the seat of the first Saudi Kingdom in the 18th century and is regarded as a centerpiece of Vision 2030 — a collection of development and diversification initiatives launched in 2016, which include major investments in culture, leisure and tourism.




Old structures in Riyadh's Diriyah cultural district, the site of the first Saudi Kingdom in the 18th century, have been preserved. (Supplied)

One of Saudi Arabia’s most ambitious cultural projects is the Journey Through Time master plan — a 15-year project to develop the AlUla valley, home to Hegra and a multitude of other historical sites, into a living museum designed to immerse visitors in 200,000 years of natural and human history.

Additionally, the Saudi Cultural Development Fund has been created under Vision 2030 to support individuals, businesses and civil society groups working in the sector. It has already disbursed SR 180 million ($47.9 million) to projects in 2021.

“Saudi Arabia is in the midst of a pivotal cultural movement,” Reem Al-Sultan, CEO of Misk Art Institute, told Arab News. “The institute recently doubled its annual Misk Art Grant to SR 1 million, making it the largest arts grant in the region, and launched the Art Library, a new legacy initiative dedicated to documenting the work of seminal Saudi and Arab artists.”

Misk Art Institute was established by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in 2017 to encourage grassroots artistic production in Saudi Arabia, nurture the appreciation of Saudi and Arab art, and enable cultural diplomacy and exchange.

“Providing support, infrastructure and opportunity for Saudi art and artists brings global awareness to the rich cultural heritage of the region, inviting greater international dialogue and enhancing our relationships with our cultural counterparts around the world,” Al-Sultan said.




Misk Art Institute designed the Masaha Residency as a way for artists to pursue new projects and ideas. (Supplied)

In neighboring UAE, Abu Dhabi announced in June that it would be investing $6 billion in cultural and creative industries on top of the $2.3 billion already pledged as part of its post-pandemic stimulus program.

“In terms of growth, we know the creative industries are going to be a major contributor to GDP in Abu Dhabi,” Mohammed Al-Mubarak, who chairs the emirate’s Department of Culture and Tourism, recently told the Financial Times.

Launched in 2019, Abu Dhabi’s Culture and Creative Industries Strategy (CCI) is a comprehensive five-year plan to accelerate business growth and job creation in the realms of film and television, visual and performing arts, gaming, e-sports, heritage, crafts and publishing.

It includes an overall planned investment of more than AED 30 billion ($8.1 billion) across the public and private sectors, with AED 8.5 billion already pledged to drive ahead monumental projects, including the Yas Creative Hub and Saadiyat Cultural District.

The Yas Creative Hub, a new media zone that includes a regional CNN newsroom, is expected to employ 8,000 workers by the end of the year. Meanwhile, the Saadiyat Cultural District, which is scheduled for completion by 2025, will feature the Abrahamic Family House — an interfaith-dialogue facility comprising a mosque, a church and a synagogue.




Saadiyat Cultural District in Abu Dhabi. (Supplied)

Some 20,000 people already work in Abu Dhabi’s creative and cultural sector. A further 15,000 jobs are expected to be created over the next four years — an ambitious goal that may not be achievable without a flexible visa system to attract outside talent, which is why Abu Dhabi is rolling out a special creative visa program, open to professionals endorsed by the Department of Culture and Tourism.

INNUMBERS

$6 billion - Abu Dhabi’s latest investment in cultural and creative industries

$40 billion - Enlarged budget for Saudi Arabia’s Diriyah Gate Project

$1 billion - Egypt’s investment in the Grand Egyptian Museum

“This isn’t a new trend. Abu Dhabi has been investing in culture significantly for over a decade,” Dyala Nusseibeh, director of Abu Dhabi Art, told Arab News.

“There is already this key investment happening. What has been announced is the continuation and expansion of that investment. Why? Because the government has done its research and found that it is a multi-billion-dollar industry. The strategy is about finding ways to harness that growth locally.”

Already home to the Louvre Abu Dhabi, the emirate will also soon host the Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. A further AED 22 billion will be released over the next five years to support new museums and creative activities.




The Zayed National Museum in Abu Dhabi, UAE. (Supplied)

“The CCI is one of the fastest-growing economic sectors worldwide,” Saood Al-Hosani, undersecretary of the Department of Culture and Tourism, told Arab News. “In Abu Dhabi, we have witnessed significant growth in the CCI, and today it is a key driver of social and economic growth, as well as diversification.

“More than 20,000 people already work in the sector, and we expect this to grow significantly over the coming years. In addition, the CCI has consistently shown considerable resilience and adaptability in the face of changing economic dynamics.

“So, as the world emerges from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, we can expect its high-value products and services to help power economic recovery.”

Egypt has also jumped on the cultural spending bandwagon to help reinvigorate its lagging tourism sector. The Grand Egyptian Museum, a brand new 5.2 million-square-foot edifice at the edge of the Giza Plateau due to open later this year, is part of a $1 billion state investment in heritage and culture.




Once completed, the Grand Egyptian Museum, also known as the Giza Museum, will be the largest archaeological museum in the world. (GEMCC via Facebook)

The Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities says it aims to raise the standard of services provided to visitors at 30 of its key attractions, museums and archaeological sites, including Al-Moez Street in Old Cairo, the capital’s Citadel, and museums in Alexandria, Fayoum, Sohag and Luxor.

Egypt is also currently building a New Administrative Capital east of Cairo, which is expected to have several theaters, exhibition halls, libraries, museums and galleries. The first phase of the city is due for completion in 2030 at a cost of $58 billion.

It is not just the state that is sinking large sums of money into Egypt’s cultural reawakening. Orascom Investments, run by Egyptian billionaire Naguib Sawiris, has signed a contract worth $12.7 million to develop and manage the sound and light shows at the Giza Pyramids.

Tourism is a huge source of revenue for the Egyptian economy, reaching $13 billion in 2019. However, just 3.5 million tourists visited the country in 2020, compared with 13.1 million a year earlier. Officials expect visitor numbers will return to pre-pandemic levels by 2022.

The hope is that once the pandemic is gradually brought under control and the global economy begins to recover, the return on the investments and other positive impacts will fully vindicate Arab governments’ decision to keep spending on culture.

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Twitter: @rebeccaaproctor


Lebanese-Australian model Jessica Kahawaty explores Saudi Arabia

Australian-Lebanese model Jessica Kahawaty is no stranger to jetting around the world. File/ Getty Images
Australian-Lebanese model Jessica Kahawaty is no stranger to jetting around the world. File/ Getty Images
Updated 05 December 2021

Lebanese-Australian model Jessica Kahawaty explores Saudi Arabia

Australian-Lebanese model Jessica Kahawaty is no stranger to jetting around the world. File/ Getty Images

DUBAI: Australian-Lebanese model, entrepreneur and influencer Jessica Kahawaty is treating her one million Instagram fans to a tour of Saudi Arabia.

This week, the model hopped between Riyadh and Jeddah, with a pitstop in the Saudi desert, for a number of events.

She hit the ground running in Riyadh with a visit to the Times Square entertainment destination in the capital and stopped off at the Echo Beauty department store and the We Cre8 department store in The Boulevard.

“Riyadh. Wow. What a welcome. Thank you #VedaHolding a pioneer in entrepreneurship in concepts like @wecre8.sa and @echobeauty.sa, for your hospitality and thank you to the people of Riyadh who found me in a quick and quiet visit to Times Square late last night after the desert and gave me the funnest welcome ever!!! Can’t wait for what’s to come soon Saudi (sic),” Kahawaty posted on Instagram alongside a carousel of images and videos of her visit.

For the occasion, she showed off a dazzling pink dress by Miu Miu.

Before her 3 a.m. trip to the mall, Kahawaty enjoyed a traditional dinner in the desert and shared a cozy-looking carousel of photos in which she can be seen enjoying kabsa in a desert camp complete with a roaring fire.

“My first Saudi desert experience with a traditional kabsa dinner (rice with lamb),” she captioned the post on Instagram.

The model, who is also an avid humanitarian, then hopped on a plane to Jeddah, during which she was treated to a meal she had been craving — a McDonald’s burger.

“They asked what cuisine I wanted, I said ‘Le McDonald’s’,” she joked on her Instagram feed.

In Jeddah, Kahawaty received a warm welcome as she arrived to stay with Saudi designer Arwa Al-Banawi before the pair enjoyed a spread of pastries and homemade goodies.

When she’s not jetting around the world, the Dubai-based 32-year-old can be found setting up charitable endeavors — evidenced most recently in her online fundraiser to support those struggling in Lebanon amid the country’s shortage of fuel, medical supplies and food in August.

“My name is Jessica Kahawaty and I, like many Lebanese expats, feel helpless watching my country and people drown in despair,” she wrote at the time.

Kahawaty said that money raised was distributed among nonprofit organizations that she personally vetted, individual families and students.


Review: Final episodes of ‘Money Heist’ are emotional and action-packed

The final episodes of ‘Money Heist’are now streaming on Netflix. (Supplied)
The final episodes of ‘Money Heist’are now streaming on Netflix. (Supplied)
Updated 04 December 2021

Review: Final episodes of ‘Money Heist’ are emotional and action-packed

The final episodes of ‘Money Heist’are now streaming on Netflix. (Supplied)

CHENNAI: A runaway hit, the last five episodes of Spanish series “Money Heist,” created by Alex Pina, were just released on Netflix to international fanfare.

Readers be warned, this review contains spoilers for the first part of season five, which was released three months ago.

Audiences were left on a cliff hanger, with the shocking death of Tokyo (Ursula Corbero) and the emotional run continues in the second part of the season, with the Professor (played by Alvaro Morte) displaying heightened sadness, triumph and nerves in the final episode.

With Tokyo’s death, the Professor is shattered and loses his grip on the situation, which opens him up to risks from all angles. Of particular interest is the developing relationship between detective Alicia Sierra (Najwa Nimri) and the Professor, all with Sierra’s newborn baby in tow. Featuring a newborn innocent in the heady mix of precarious action ups the ante and introduces a heightened level of risk for audiences who will no doubt watch with bated breath.

In the final episodes, the Professor also sees his reasoning questioned by some members of the gang, including Rio (Miguel Herran) who harbors doubts about the morality of stealing gold from the country’s reserves.

On the opposing side, Colonel Tamayo (Fernando Cayo) lost many of his men when he attempted to storm the bank, but is undeterred. He has made his life's mission to get the Professor and his group down on their knees and will stoop low to achieve this, as we come to see. 

“Money Heist” is gripping to the core, and we are so taken in by what is happening on screen that we are willing not only to forgive the misdeeds of the robbers, but also cheer them on. The emotional notes in the final episodes make it all the more magnetically appealing, and allow audiences to wave off the artistic liberties taken by the director with regards to some of the less than believable scenes. 

A particularly noteworthy focus of the latest run is Berlin (Pedro Alonso), whose life is revealed through flashbacks that make up a marvelous character study.

Audiences will be relieved to find a lot of questions are answered, and due the way it ends this global phenomenon is sure to be remembered for a long time.


US-Iraqi beauty mogul Mona Kattan gets engaged

Mona Kattan is the founder of the Kayali fragrance empire. (File/ Getty Images)
Mona Kattan is the founder of the Kayali fragrance empire. (File/ Getty Images)
Updated 04 December 2021

US-Iraqi beauty mogul Mona Kattan gets engaged

Mona Kattan is the founder of the Kayali fragrance empire. (File/ Getty Images)

DUBAI: Friends and fans flooded US-Iraqi beauty mogul Mona Kattan’s Instagram account on Saturday, after the Huda Beauty global president announced her engagement to Dubai-based businessman Hassan El-Amin.

“Forever Ever,” Kattan captioned a carousel of images posted late on Friday night, showing the Kayali fragrance founder posing with a diamond ring on her finger and alongside her soon-to-be husband.

Influencers, beauty entrepreneurs and celebrities took to Kattan’s comments section to send their well wishes.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Mona Kattan (@monakattan“Congrats baby, (you) deserve the world,” doctor and influencer Sarah Al-Madani commented, while Faryal Makhdoom, wife of British boxing star Amir Khan, wrote “congrats cutie.”

According to El-Amin’s LinkedIn account, he is the head of facultative at Middle East and Africa at Aon Reinsurance Solutions and relocated to Dubai after studying at Cass Business School in London and graduating with a Masters of Science.

It seems Kattan’s new fiancé is as family-focused as she is — he even runs an Instagram account together with his two siblings called @the.elamins.

The siblings feature heavily in the carousel of images shared by Kattan, with snaps including both Sally and Ahmed El-Amin.

With a background in graphic design and illustrating, Sally boasts a portfolio of clients that includes  Huda Beauty, leading some to speculate that she could be the link between the loved-up couple.

The good news tops off a busy year for Kattan, who, alongside her sister Huda, announced a number of new investments and initiatives in 2021.

In the summer, the sister duo announced Ketish as the first brand to be launched by Huda Beauty Angels — which falls under HB Investments, their venture capital firm. Ketish, a feminine care label, is spearheaded by Eman Abbass, a former Huda Beauty product developer.

Since then, Mona has focused heavily on the sisters’ fragrance range, Kayali, of which she is the founder and creative head.

The latest Kayali product was launched this week and is called Eden Juicy Apple — a “playful, vibrant and super juicy” scent that is based on “crisp and juicy red apples, sweet berries and fresh floral notes,” according to the brand.

In October, Kayali won the coveted Niche Product of the Year prize at the Beautyworld Middle East Awards for its Sweet Diamond Pink Pepper fragrance.


What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency

What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency
Updated 04 December 2021

What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency

What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency

Authors: Stephen J. Collier & Andrew Lakoff

From pandemic disease, to the disasters associated with global warming, to cyberattacks, today we face an increasing array of catastrophic threats. It is striking that, despite the diversity of these threats, experts and officials approach them in common terms — as future events that threaten to disrupt the vital, vulnerable systems upon which modern life depends.
The Government of Emergency tells the story of how this now taken-for-granted way of understanding and managing emergencies arose. Amid the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War, an array of experts and officials working in obscure government offices developed a new understanding of the nation as a complex of vital, vulnerable systems. They invented technical and administrative devices to mitigate the nation’s vulnerability, and organized a distinctive form of emergency government that would make it possible to prepare for and manage potentially catastrophic events.


Misk Art Week showcases artists from Saudi Arabia and international community

Afra Aldhaheri’s “End of A School Braid” (2021), part of the Misk Art Grant exhibition “Under Construction” at Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)
Afra Aldhaheri’s “End of A School Braid” (2021), part of the Misk Art Grant exhibition “Under Construction” at Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)
Updated 03 December 2021

Misk Art Week showcases artists from Saudi Arabia and international community

Afra Aldhaheri’s “End of A School Braid” (2021), part of the Misk Art Grant exhibition “Under Construction” at Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)
  • For its fifth year, Misk Art Institute’s annual event features several exhibitions exploring the nature of identity

RIYADH: Inside Riyadh’s Prince Faisal bin Fahd Arts Hall, multimedia artworks are displayed across the venue’s two floors on the theme of Takween, which means “form” in Arabic, and its relation to one’s identity.

As part of Misk Art Week’s fifth outing, taking place until Dec. 5, artists from Saudi Arabia, the Gulf, North Africa and the wider international community present art that questions identity — specifically how an individual’s social, historical and cultural origins influence their past, present and future.

From video works produced with AI to paintings, textile-based art and installations, the art on show aims, according to the Misk Art Institute, to offer a “critical platform for the creative community,” fostering cultural dialogue and intellectual exchange.

As visitors enter the hall, they are confronted by two dark figures by Saudi artist Filwa Nazer, made of black polyethylene industrial netting and titled The Other is Another Body (2021). The figures seem to guard the vibrantly colored wool-weave tapestry work hanging on a wall between them, titled Palm (1985), by American artist Sheila Hicks.

The works are part of Here, Now, the third in a series of the Misk Art Institute’s annual flagship exhibition, curated this time by British writer and curator Sacha Craddock alongside Misk’s assistant curators, Nora Algosaibi and Alia Ahmad Al-Saud.

The show, which features a mix of emerging and established artists and runs until Jan. 30, 2022, is the first in the Saudi capital to present works by both Saudi and international artists, including ones by well-known Saudi artists such as Manal Al-Dowayan’s abstract black and white work, I am Here (2016), Ayman Yossri Daydban’s Tree House (2019), and Sami Ali AlHossein’s colorful abstract figurative works on canvas. There is also a painting by renowned Sudanese painter Salah Elmur titled The Angry Singer (2015) and delicate floral drawings by Korean artist Young In Hong dating to 2009.

While without an overarching narrative, the show prompts the spectator to question, like the exhibition’s title, “why here and why now?” It encourages the visitor to reflect on the artworks and the nature of identity in a reflective, personal and subjective manner.

Upstairs is Under Construction, an exhibition of Misk Art Grant recipients who hail this year from Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain, Kuwait and Algeria. The grant funds up to SR1 million ($266,632) and has been distributed among the nine participating artists and collectives.

Basma Al-Shathry, lead curator at Misk Art Institute, said: “This year’s Misk Art Grant exhibition, ‘Under Construction,’ explores how identity is perceived as an emblem of growth, continuity and endless iterations of cultural representation throughout history. It has been a delight to bring together artists and designers from both the Middle East and North Africa to address the theme as a process of development, repetition, distortion and incompleteness in a time of synthesis, understanding and promise for the future.”

Mira AlMazrooei and Jawaher AlMutairi’s “Glass Libary” (2021). Part of the Misk Art Grant exhibition titled  “Under construction” at Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)

The works on show also respond to the theme of identity while focusing on how identity can be perceived as a method for growth and renewal, as well as social and historical continuity, via the incorporation of cultural representations throughout history.

One of the most poignant works is by Emirati artist and designer Latifa Saeed’s Sand Room (2021), which presents an assembly of sand-encased glass panels in the form of a cube that one can enter to observe the desert sand sediments that she collected from construction sites around Dubai.

Latifa Saeed’s “Sand room” (2021). Part of the Misk Art Grant exhibition titled “Under Construction” at Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)

“My research and work is always about transformation, whether it be of a city or of one’s mentality,” Saeed told Arab News. “I began by building an archive of sand from Dubai because the sites from where I collected the sand we cannot visit anymore because they are now construction sites.

Saeed visited development sites in Dubai, and before the construction started she would collect sand from the area and label it accordingly. She now has more than 200 different types of sand from these areas.

“I am archiving, preserving and documenting the Dubai landscape, topography and the material itself,” she said.

Near to Saeed’s mesmerizing room of sand specimens is Emirati artist Afra Al-Dhaheri’s End of a School Braid (2021) — a large installation of twisted and backcombed off-white colored rope that hangs from the ceiling. In this piece Al-Dhaheri examines how hair can be seen as the keeper of memories, preserving not only time but cultural norms and heritage.

Bahraini artist Noor Alwan’s Sacred Spaces (2021), a series of hanging textile-based tapestry works, similarly seeks to preserve personal and collective memories. Growing up, she would watch her grandfather ritually draw hundreds of patterns on paper — a tradition that stemmed from his childhood and that immersed him in a meditative process of repetition. Alwan recalls his trance-like process of art creation and likens it to a shared Arab collective practice — with elements mirroring the mesmerizing geometric forms of Islamic art.

Nour Alwan’s “Sacred Spaces,” (2021). Part of the Misk Art Grant exhibition titled “Under Construction” at Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)

Moving into the rapidly developing digital landscape is an engaging work by Saudi artist Obaid Alsafi, titled Beyond Language (2021), in which a poem by the late revered Saudi poet Muhammad Al-Thubaiti Poetry (1952-2011), titled Salutation to the Master of the Arid Land, is transformed into a video work with sound via artificial intelligence. For the work, which captivates the viewer through its colorful abstract images — some seem like palm trees while others appear to be figures — Alsafi trained the AI through data collection and machine learning to understand poetry and produce visual representations of each verse with accompanying machine-made sound.

“The first form of art in the region and the way we connected with each other was through poetry,” Alsafi, an artist who studied computer science, told Arab News. “Al-Thubaiti, one of Saudi’s pioneer poets, changed the way that poetry was written and read. Everyone sees AI as robotic, but my vision, I want to see how we can make the machine more human so that it understands language, learn and develop artwork depending on the vision of the artist. I believe artists can use AI as a tool to develop their work.”

Lastly, there is the second iteration of works created in the Masaha residency program, located in the basement of the Prince Faisal bin Fahd Arts Hall.

The program, part of Misk Art Institute’s mission to support Saudi and international practitioners across the artistic disciplines in the research and production of new works via mentorship opportunities, can be viewed on the ground floor. Titled HOME: Being and Belonging, the works by 10 visual artists from the UK, Guatemala, Morocco, India, South Korea, and from across Saudi Arabia, examine questions of how an individual and collective sense of belonging and nostalgia for one’s culture and heritage stems from one’s socio-cultural and ethnic background. The works on show explore how our sense of belonging changes and transforms with time.

The residency offers international artists the opportunity to create work on site at Masaha over a three-month cycle. Many of the participating artists are showing their work for the first time in the Kingdom — demonstrating once again Misk Art Institute’s broader aims to expand Saudi Arabia’s cultural landscape through international creative dialogue.

Hana Almilli’s “Through The Earth I Come Back Home” (2021). Part of the Masaha Residency showcase during Misk Art Week 2021. (Omar Al-Tamimi)