Iranian prosecutor charged with war crimes

Iranian prosecutor charged with war crimes
Street view of Terhan with Arg Mosque and Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khomeini. Swedish prosecutors Tuesday charged Iranian Hamid Noury for "war crimes and murder" over political prisoners’ executions in 1988. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 28 July 2021

Iranian prosecutor charged with war crimes

Iranian prosecutor charged with war crimes
  • The victims were linked to the People’s Mujahedin of Iran, a political organization

JEDDAH: A former Iranian prosecutor was charged on Tuesday with war crimes and murder over the execution of more than 100 political prisoners in Iran in 1988.

Hamid Noury, 60, has been under arrest in Sweden since 2019, when he was detained at Stockholm airport as he arrived to visit relatives.

Human rights groups have been campaigning for years for justice over the extrajudicial execution of thousands of Iranians, mostly young people, in the late 1980s. 

The victims were linked to the People’s Mujahedin of Iran, a political organization that seeks to overthrow Iran’s ruling clerics.

In the summer of 1988, Supreme Leader Ali Khomeini “issued an order to execute all prisoners held in Iranian prisons who sympathized with and were loyal in their convictions to the Mujahedin,” Swedish prosecutors said on Tuesday. 

At the time, Noury was an assistant prosecutor at Gohardasht Prison on the outskirts of Karaj, west of Tehran.

Noury “is suspected of participating … in these mass executions and, as such, intentionally taking the lives of a large number of prisoners who sympathized with the Mujahedin and, additionally, of subjecting prisoners to severe suffering which is deemed torture and inhuman treatment,” prosecutor Kristina Lindhoff Carleson said.

Noury’s trial begins on Aug. 10 in Stockholm and is expected to last about eight months. It is likely to be embarrassing for Iran, where rights groups say many officials involved in the extrajudicial killings in the 1980s are still in positions of power.

They include the newly elected president, Ebrahim Raisi, who Amnesty International says played a key role as a prosecutor on the “death commission” that sent thousands of prisoners to be killed.


Adopt Urdu, learn Arabic ‘just like our ancestors,’ Pakistan’s top court says

Adopt Urdu, learn Arabic ‘just like our ancestors,’ Pakistan’s top court says
Updated 26 sec ago

Adopt Urdu, learn Arabic ‘just like our ancestors,’ Pakistan’s top court says

Adopt Urdu, learn Arabic ‘just like our ancestors,’ Pakistan’s top court says
  • ‘We will lose our identity,’ Supreme Court warns over the government’s failure to make Urdu official language, despite a 2015 order

ISLAMABAD: The Supreme Court has said that Pakistan risked losing its identity due to the federal government’s failure to adopt Urdu as the official language of the Muslim-majority South Asian nation.

On Monday, a three-member bench headed by Acting Chief Justice Umar Ata Bandial presided over the hearing in a contempt of court case. In 2015, the top court ordered that the government adopt Urdu as its official language.

“Without a mother tongue and national language, we will lose our identity,” Justice Bandial was quoted by the Express Tribune newspaper as saying as he heard a case filed by lawyer Kokab Iqbal against Urdu not being used in Pakistan as the official language.

“In my opinion, we should also learn Persian and Arabic, just like our ancestors.”

“Article 251 of the Constitution mentions the mother language along with the regional languages,” the acting chief justice said as he also sought a reply from the Punjab government for failing to introduce Punjabi as an official language in the province.

The court sent notices to the federal and Punjab governments and adjourned the hearing for a month.

In June, Prime Minister Imran Khan ordered that all official events and proceedings be held in Urdu.

“Henceforth, all the programs events/ceremonies arranged for the prime minister shall be conducted in the national [Urdu] language,” a notification issued in English by the prime minister’s office said. “Further necessary action to implement the above directions of the prime minister shall be taken by all concerned accordingly.”

Passed in 1973, the Pakistani Constitution specifies that the government must make Urdu the national language within 15 years. The law is yet to be implemented, and English has remained the choice for official communication. While dozens of languages are spoken in Pakistan, Urdu is its lingua franca, even though it is the first language of less than 10 percent of Pakistanis.

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Taliban names Afghan UN envoy, asks to speak to world leaders

Taliban names Afghan UN envoy, asks to speak to world leaders
Updated 11 min 50 sec ago

Taliban names Afghan UN envoy, asks to speak to world leaders

Taliban names Afghan UN envoy, asks to speak to world leaders
  • Taliban Foreign Minister Amir Khan Muttaqi made the request in a letter to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Monday
  • The move sets up a showdown with Ghulam Isaczai, the UN ambassador in New York representing Afghanistan’s government ousted last month by the Taliban

UNITED NATIONS: The Taliban have asked to address world leaders at the United Nations in New York this week and nominated their Doha-based spokesman Suhail Shaheen as Afghanistan’s UN ambassador, according to a letter seen by Reuters on Tuesday.
Taliban Foreign Minister Amir Khan Muttaqi made the request in a letter to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on Monday. Muttaqi asked to speak during the annual high-level meeting of the General Assembly, which finishes on Monday.
Guterres’ spokesperson, Farhan Haq, confirmed Muttaqi’s letter. The move sets up a showdown with Ghulam Isaczai, the UN ambassador in New York representing Afghanistan’s government ousted last month by the Taliban.
Haq said the rival requests for Afghanistan’s UN seat had been sent to a nine-member credentials committee, whose members include the United States, China and Russia. The committee is unlikely to meet on the issue before Monday, so it is doubtful that the Taliban foreign minister will address the world body.
Eventual UN acceptance of the ambassador of the Taliban would be an important step in the hard-line Islamist group’s bid for international recognition, which could help unlock badly needed funds for the cash-strapped Afghan economy.
Guterres has said that the Taliban’s desire for international recognition is the only leverage other countries have to press for inclusive government and respect for rights, particularly for women, in Afghanistan.
The Taliban letter said Isaczai’s mission “is considered over and that he no longer represents Afghanistan,” said Haq.
Until a decision is made by the credentials committee Isaczai will remain in the seat, according to the General Assembly rules. He is currently scheduled to address the final day of the meeting on Sept. 27, but it was not immediately clear if any countries might object in the wake of the Taliban letter.
The committee traditionally meets in October or November to assess the credentials of all UN members before submitting a report for General Assembly approval before the end of the year. The committee and General Assembly usually operate by consensus on credentials, diplomats said.
Others members of the committee are the Bahamas, Bhutan, Chile, Namibia, Sierra Leone and Sweden.
When the Taliban last ruled between 1996 and 2001 the ambassador of the Afghan government they toppled remained the UN representative after the credentials committee deferred its decision on rival claims to the seat.
The decision was postponed “on the understanding that the current representatives of Afghanistan accredited to the United Nations would continue to participate in the work of the General Assembly,” according to the committee report.

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Rare campus massacre shakes Russian city

Rare campus massacre shakes Russian city
Updated 24 min 35 sec ago

Rare campus massacre shakes Russian city

Rare campus massacre shakes Russian city
  • The attack , one of the worst in recent Russian history, has left Urals city of around one million people reeling from shock
  • School shootings are relatively unusual in Russia due to tight security at education facilities

PERM, Russia: Yuri Aydarov was about to start an algorithms class at his university in the central Russian city of Perm when he heard people running in the corridor.
Then he saw a gunman.
Aydarov, a lecturer at Perm State University, was one of the witnesses of a shooting spree in which an 18-year-old student killed six people and wounded nearly 30 on campus on Monday morning.
The attack — one of the worst in recent Russian history — has left the Urals city of around one million people reeling from shock.
Aydarov was able to protect his students by telling them to stay away from windows and forcing the auditorium doors shut with the help of a colleague.
He saw the black-clad shooter — identified as Timur Bekmansurov — walk by his auditorium through a window, saying he was wearing a “sort of helmet.”
“We stayed quiet,” Aydarov told AFP.
All 17 students and staff members who locked themselves in Aydarov’s auditorium survived.
Most of Bekmansurov’s victims — mostly aged between 18 and 25 — died in the corridor just outside.
After a day marred by chaos, staff and students at the university struggled to make sense of the violence.
Aydarov said that teachers from “around the world” who have survived similar ordeals have been reaching out to him on social media and it really “helps” him.
School shootings are relatively unusual in Russia due to tight security at education facilities and because it is difficult to buy firearms.
But the country has seen an increase in school attacks in recent years.
With lectures at the university canceled on Tuesday, students slowly emerged late from their dorms, traumatized by the mass shooting.
Holding back tears, they laid red carnations at a makeshift memorial at the gates of the university that they walk through every day.
Some recalled finding out there was an attacker in the building from social media, and not believing it before hearing shots.
Others were anxiously awaiting news from wounded classmates, with several of the most seriously injured airlifted some 1,300 kilometers (800 miles) west for further treatment in Moscow.
The deans of all of the city’s universities also laid flowers at the gates of the campus in a show of solidarity.
“We feel support from the whole of Russia and that really helps,” said politics lecturer Ksenia Punina.
The attacker lay in a hospital across town, heavily injured during his detention. He was reportedly on a ventilator and had his leg amputated.
In May, another teenage gunman killed nine people in a school in Kazan, which lies between Perm and Moscow.
“When this happened in Kazan, I thought this could never happen here in Perm, it’s always calm here,” said medicine student Maria Denisova.
In recent years, similar attacks also took place in Moscow-annexed Crimea and the far eastern city of Blagoveshchensk.
On the day of the Kazan attack, President Vladimir Putin called for a review of gun control laws.
But some in Perm said more should be done to prevent gun violence.
“If it’s so easy for a boy to get hold of (a gun), I think it should be stricter,” said 20-year-old Denisova.
The head of the chemistry department, Irina Moshevskaya, said violence was a “systemic problem in our society,” blaming it on popular online culture.
Just opposite the heavily guarded campus is a shop selling hunting guns. It was closed on the day after the attack.
Moshevskaya said that staff were able to lock students inside science labs, avoiding more deaths.
One chemistry lecturer “used her laptop bag to make sure her auditorium’s doors were tightly shut,” she said.
Some students complained that one lecturer had continued his class despite being told an active gunman was in the building.
On the other side of the city, dozens queued at a blood donation center, responding to calls on social media to help the victims.
Most people in Perm praised the quick response of everyone on the campus.
“From first-aid nurses to senior university staff, everyone rose to the occasion,” said engineering lecturer and former policeman Aleksei Repyakh.


UK ‘marathon man’ raises awareness, money for Palestine in 4-part race challenge

UK ‘marathon man’ raises awareness, money for Palestine in 4-part race challenge
Updated 33 min 43 sec ago

UK ‘marathon man’ raises awareness, money for Palestine in 4-part race challenge

UK ‘marathon man’ raises awareness, money for Palestine in 4-part race challenge
  • Haroon Mota shot to prominence inspiring British Muslims to get active during COVID-19 lockdown, Ramadan
  • Aims to raise funds for Palestine by running marathons in Berlin, London, Chicago, New York over the next 2 months

LONDON: A British Muslim is set to begin a four-part marathon series to promote sport in the UK’s Muslim community and to raise money for people in Palestine.

Haroon Mota, from Coventry, nicknamed “marathon man” will run the Berlin Marathon on Sunday before competing in the London Marathon on Oct. 3, the Chicago Marathon on Oct. 10, and finally the New York Marathon on Nov. 7.

Initially, Mota said, running a marathon was something he wanted to do for personal reasons. But after running the 2011 Coventry Half Marathon and the 2012 London Marathon to raise money for the Teenage Cancer Trust charity, he said he was motivated to do more after noting “little representation of ethnic minorities” running alongside him.

“At first, running a marathon was something to tick off the bucket list,” Mota said. “While I have always been into sports and keeping fit, taking part in a marathon was supposed to be a one-off. Running also helped me deal with my grief after my father tragically passed away in a car accident.”

Mota initially put together a diverse team of fellow runners to take part in the Coventry Half Marathon and used social media to spread awareness of his intention. His personal Instagram account is now attracting more than 10,000 followers. 

He worked to spread awareness about the importance of exercise during the coronavirus lockdown to the Muslim community, which, he said, often felt exercise was not part of its “DNA.” He also worked to promote safe exercise during Ramadan and ran more than 260 kilometers — while fasting — to raise £50,000 ($68,300) for good causes.

For this year’s challenge, however, Mota was inspired to also help those who suffered as a result of the Israeli bombardment of Gaza in May.

“To raise awareness of their plight, I have pledged to raise £50,000 to help provide emergency aid to those affected by the most recent airstrikes and violent attacks in Gaza, and also offer humanitarian assistance to the hundreds of thousands of Palestinian families who are struggling with harsh economic hardship,” Mota said.

“I am particularly looking forward to taking part in the London leg of my four-marathon challenge.

Mota is a fundraising manager at Islamic Charity Penny Appeal, has visited Palestine several times over the past few years, and learned more about the plight of its people.

“Witnessing their struggle first hand, this is a cause I feel very passionate about,” he said. “I am now even more driven and committed to helping their plight, and this is why I am running for them.”

Those wishing to donate to Mota’s cause can do so via www.justgiving.com/running4palestine. His progress can be tracked via social media using the hashtag #Running4Palestine.


French court lengthens jihadist’s sentence on appeal

French court lengthens jihadist’s sentence on appeal
Updated 21 September 2021

French court lengthens jihadist’s sentence on appeal

French court lengthens jihadist’s sentence on appeal
PARIS: A French appeal court on Tuesday increased an extremist’s sentence for his senior role with Daesh group in Syria from 30 years to life in prison.
Frenchman Tyler Vilus had already been convicted for his work with the Daesh group there between 2013 and 2015.
On appeal, the court also ordered that the 31-year-old serve a minimum of 22 years in jail.
He was deemed a “major risk” to re-offend and still denied some of the charges.
Vilus led the “Al-MuHajjireen” (the immigrants) brigade, a squadron that tortured and carried out summary executions.
He was deported to France after being arrested at an Istanbul airport with a Swiss passport in July 2015 en route to Europe to carry out an attack.
His mother, dubbed “Mama Jihad” in the French press, traveled three times to Syria in support of her son and was sentenced to 10 years in prison in June 2017 for her “unfailing commitment” to jihad.
Among the charges, Vilus was found guilty of taking part in the public execution of two blindfolded prisoners, which was filmed for a propaganda video.
Vilus stood, head bowed, behind a glass screen to hear the verdict after an eight-day hearing under tight security in central Paris.