Saudi women appointed to top roles at Presidency of the Two Holy Mosques for first time

The new structural changes would support the success and development of the administration. (Photo/Twitter)
The new structural changes would support the success and development of the administration. (Photo/Twitter)
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Updated 09 August 2021

Saudi women appointed to top roles at Presidency of the Two Holy Mosques for first time

The new structural changes would support the success and development of the administration. (Photo/Twitter)
  • Abdul Hamid Al-Maliki: The first benchmark focuses on youth empowerment, as young leaders in the new organizational structure represent 90 percent of the master’s degrees and doctorates

MAKKAH: Two Saudi women have been appointed to top positions at the General Presidency for the Affairs of the Two Holy Mosques in an ambitious move to empower qualified women.
Sheikh Abdulrahman Al-Sudais, the organization’s president, appointed Dr. Al-Anoud Al-Aboud and Dr. Fatima Al-Rashoud as assistants to his office on Sunday, as part of a raft of administrative changes.
Other senior positions were given to Dr. Kamelia Al-Daadi, who was appointed assistant undersecretary for women’s administrative and service affairs, Dr. Ibtehab Al-Jeaid, who was appointed vice president of libraries and scientific research, and Dr. Norah Al-Thuwaibi, who was appointed vice president for scientific, intellectual and women’s guidance affairs.
The new positions come in conjunction with a recent decision to appoint an assistant undersecretary for women’s empowerment, and alongside the recent celebration of the awarding of 20 women with master’s degrees and doctorates.
Al-Daadi told Arab News that the new structural changes would support the success and development of the administration, calling them a true reflection of a work environment full of progress, and a continuation of the Saudi leadership’s support for the General Presidency. “The responsibility is doubled when it comes to the Two Holy Mosques because they are the destination for millions of Muslims, and serving them is a matter of great honor that everyone seeks.”
She added that the ambitious strategy that the General Presidency is working on reflects the aim to increase the capacity for pilgrims in the near future, to accommodate 60,000 worshippers a day while applying the highest health and safety standards. “Everyone at the General Presidency is working on preparing integrated work methodologies and exerting all possible efforts to become a true model of institutional work, governance, quality, supporting women and establishing creative work environments, which would contribute to … development and efficiency in a short period.”

HIGHLIGHT

Sheikh Abdulrahman Al-Sudais appointed Dr. Al-Anoud Al-Aboud and Dr. Fatima Al-Rashoud as assistants to his office. Other senior positions were given to Dr. Kamelia Al-Daadi, who was appointed assistant undersecretary for women’s administrative and service affairs, Dr. Ibtehab Al-Jeaid, who was appointed vice president of libraries and scientific research, and Dr. Norah Al-Thuwaibi, who was appointed vice president for scientific, intellectual and women’s guidance affairs.

Abdul Hamid Al-Maliki, the deputy president for planning and developmental affairs, and assistant undersecretary for the affairs of the Grand Mosque, told Arab News that the new organizational structure has four main pillars.
“These pillars were based on several benchmarks, in light of which the General Presidency’s new organizational structure was established,” he said. “Sheikh Abdulrahman Al-Sudais, has worked on promoting and consolidating these benchmarks during his tenure for over 10 years.”
According to Al-Maliki, the first benchmark focuses on youth empowerment, as young leaders in the new organizational structure represent 90 percent of the master’s degrees and doctorates. The second benchmark focuses on women’s empowerment; the third on development, technology, artificial intelligence, digital transformation, and translation.
“This will have an impact on the way the Two Holy Mosques’ message is conveyed, the operational system of the services provided at the Two Holy Mosques, governance, and performance measurement,” he explained.
“Lastly, investment, financial sustainability, privatization and the endowment funds, which will support the various programs and projects included in the General Presidency’s strategic and executive plans … towards the objectives of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030,”  Al-Maliki added.


Saudi FM discusses Iran nuclear talks with EU envoy — statement

Updated 28 sec ago

Saudi FM discusses Iran nuclear talks with EU envoy — statement

Saudi FM discusses Iran nuclear talks with EU envoy — statement

CAIRO: Saudi foreign minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al-Saud discussed the Iran nuclear talks with the European Union envoy coordinating talks on reviving the Iran nuclear deal, Enrique Mora, the Saudi Foreign ministry said on Thursday.
“They discussed developments regarding the Iranian nuclear program talks, and international efforts to ensure that Iran does not violate international agreements and treaties in this regard,” it added in a statement.


Ikmah’s ‘open library’ in AlUla offers joy of reading ancient texts

Ikmah’s ‘open library’ in AlUla offers joy of reading ancient texts
Updated 9 min 1 sec ago

Ikmah’s ‘open library’ in AlUla offers joy of reading ancient texts

Ikmah’s ‘open library’ in AlUla offers joy of reading ancient texts

ALULA: Imagine stepping back into a time before cell phones, emails, or even paper. During this era, documenting important moments was simplified to sketching
on rocks.
This is Ikmah mountain, or the “open library” as it is referred to by AlUla’s locals. AlUla was a highlight on the trading route many took through the Arabian Peninsula. Travelers stopped at the mountain to document their stories or carve their names for those who came after them.
“We call Ikmah the ‘open library.’ If you want to know why it has this name, have a look around for a few seconds and you will see inscriptions all over the mountain,” Amal Aljahani, an expert Rawi storyteller, told Arab News.

Ikmah has over 500 inscriptions from the Dadan and Lihyan civilization. The earliest texts from the mountain have been studied and translated by historians and archeologists and have been dated back to the ninth and 10th century B.C. 
The languages in the mountain include Aramaic, Thamudic, Dadanitic, Minaen, Nabatean, Greek, Latin, and Arabic. An important area for historians, Arabic linguistics experts, and archaeologists, the mountain offers a look back into the pre-Arabic era.
Tourists from the Kingdom and international visitors gather for hours to sit in front of the high peaks and observe the delicate techniques of the ancient language that turned into the modern Arabic letters we know today.

 

Some inscriptions were written by the region’s professional scribes while others were merely sketches by travellers and locals passing by years ago.
Many of these messages differed in meaning, some surviving inscriptions are names written in the ancient Arabic text, but many involve tales of the ongoing events of the local community.
These inscriptions described the kings who ruled the land, the religious beliefs of the people, and sometimes notes for other visitors.
Ikmah held a high place in the hearts of the locals and travelers. It was a sacred ground for pagan worship and sacrifice along with documentation.  One of the inscriptions on the mountains was written by a woman named “Mirwa,” who carved her name into the rocks and detailed an offering she made to her deity.

“The woman used to come here and give her deity offerings to bless her and her children. The inscription says the deity blessed her and her children. Those are the kinds of things the people wrote here on this beautiful mountain,” Aljahani said.
Mirwa returned to add another inscription that her prayers were answered and her sons were blessed.
Some of these inscriptions are personal, while others are names or drawings of animals and musical instruments.
The oldest inscription in the Islamic era — known as the Naqsh Zuhayr — and the earliest glimpses into the Arabic language are documented on the east side. The inscriptions date back to 644 A.D.
The mountain hosts different inscription methods, Aljahani said, such as “carving inside the alphabet to be clearer.”
He added: “The second way is what we call the 3D way. It is the hardest method. They beautifully carved in between the alphabet letters using sand stones for the message to be clearer.”
In 2017, the Royal Commission of AlUla closed the mountain to begin preparation for the public to visit. Ikmah is now prepared and open to the public under the commission’s supervision.

The rebirth of AlUla
Hegra, ancient city of the Nabataeans in Saudi Arabia’s historic AlUla Valley, is emerging from the mists of time to take its rightful place as one of the wonders of the world
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Saudi education minister, Egyptian envoy discuss cooperation

Saudi education minister, Egyptian envoy discuss cooperation
Updated 36 min 55 sec ago

Saudi education minister, Egyptian envoy discuss cooperation

Saudi education minister, Egyptian envoy discuss cooperation

RIYADH: Saudi Education Minister Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Sheikh met with the Egyptian Ambassador to the Kingdom, Ahmed Farouk Tawfiq, to enhance joint cooperation between the two countries in the education field.
The two sides also discussed the development of scientific and research partnerships between the countries’ universities along with the exchange of expertise and experiences in educational technologies.
The talks focused on joint cooperation between the Kingdom and Egypt in educational programs and ways to benefit from the development plans and programs implemented by educational institutions in both countries.
Saudi Ministry of Education’s undersecretary for international cooperation, Saleh Al-Qassumi, undersecretary for public education, Mohammed Al-Muqbil, undersecretary for university education, Mohammed Al-Adib, general supervisor of the general administration of media and communication, Ahmed Al-Jumaiyah, and supervisor of the public relations department, Saleh Al-Thubaiti, also attended the meeting.


Pilgrim services in the spotlight at GITEX Dubai

Pilgrim services in the spotlight at GITEX Dubai
Updated 41 min 11 sec ago

Pilgrim services in the spotlight at GITEX Dubai

Pilgrim services in the spotlight at GITEX Dubai

DUBAI: As part of the Saudi Ministry of Interior’s pavilion at GITEX Technology Week 2021 in Dubai this week, the Ministry of Hajj and Umrah showcased the state-of-the-art technologies it employs to deliver the services the Kingdom provides to pilgrims and other visitors.
They include artificial intelligence technologies that are used as part of the ministry’s digital platform to help pilgrims.
They access the platform using smart cards that contain key information, including the details of their visit and medical data. This is used to organize their journeys.
The ministry’s aim in adopting the latest technology is to provide upgraded services and develop the work of the pilgrim-services system as a whole.


Top KSrelief official represents Saudi Arabia at Geneva talks

Top KSrelief official represents Saudi Arabia at Geneva talks
Updated 44 min 59 sec ago

Top KSrelief official represents Saudi Arabia at Geneva talks

Top KSrelief official represents Saudi Arabia at Geneva talks

GENEVA: King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center Assistant Supervisor General for Planning and Development Aqeel Al-Ghamdi said Saudi Arabia is fully prepared to share its experiences regarding humanitarian and relief issues with the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. 
Al-Ghamdi represented the Kingdom at a meeting of donor countries of the UN OCHA held in Geneva on Wednesday in order to develop and support humanitarian efforts.

At the meeting, a report from the Multilateral Organization Performance Assessment Network, known as MOPAN, on the performance of the UN OCHA was also discussed. 
Al-Ghamdi thanked MOPAN for preparing the report as Saudi Arabia viewed it as a positive step to support the office and address the challenges facing the implementation of humanitarian initiatives.