UK inquest into hijab-wearing kickboxer’s death calls for more paramedics

UK inquest into hijab-wearing kickboxer’s death calls for more paramedics
Saeideh Aletaha, 26, collapsed in a bathroom and died the day after being knocked out by her opponent Janie Morgan, 34, in a mixed martial arts fight. (Screenshot/Facebook)
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Updated 08 September 2021

UK inquest into hijab-wearing kickboxer’s death calls for more paramedics

UK inquest into hijab-wearing kickboxer’s death calls for more paramedics
  • Saeideh Aletaha, 26, wanted to show Muslim women could take part in extreme sports
  • Coroner rules that her death in 2019 was accidental

LONDON: A coroner in England has called for more paramedics at combat sports events after a young hijab-wearing kickboxer died following a mixed martial arts bout.

Saeideh Aletaha, 26, collapsed after she was knocked unconscious by her opponent during a Fast and Furious Fight Series contest in 2019.

Her family were concerned that her opponent, Janie Morgan, 34, appeared much stronger than Aletaha.

An inquest at Winchester Crown Court heard that paramedics present at the contest treated Aletaha and found she had suffered a heavy knockout following a blow to the head.

Aletaha, who took up the sport to prove Muslim women could fight despite wearing a hijab, collapsed in the bathroom of the venue after her bout, Mail Online reported.

She was taken to Southampton General Hospital and was pronounced dead the following day.

On Tuesday, Christopher Wilkinson, Hampshire’s senior coroner, concluded that Aletaha’s death was the result of a tragic accident.

He ruled that the kickboxer suffered a brain bleed that was unexpected and highly unusual, but said that more paramedics should be deployed during amateur contests.

The coroner said that Aletaha suffered severe injuries caused by massive blows and punches during the fight, with one or more of the punches causing death.

In recording a verdict of accidental death, Wilkinson said that paramedics on duty could not have done more to help Aletaha.

He said there are invariably risks associated with dangerous sports, and that both fighters were aware of the dangers and took part willingly.

The inquest heard that the two paramedics left Aletaha alone before she collapsed because they had to return to ringside.

Wilkinson said that Aletaha should have been kept under observation for longer.

He also said that despite her opponent being more muscular, Aletaha was slightly heavier and the bout was evenly matched.