New UN Yemen envoy: We all have shared responsibility to end conflict

New UN Yemen envoy: We all have shared responsibility to end conflict
Hans Grundberg delivered his first briefing to the Security Council in his capacity as the new UN Special Envoy for Yemen on Friday. (@OSE_Yemen)
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Updated 10 September 2021

New UN Yemen envoy: We all have shared responsibility to end conflict

New UN Yemen envoy: We all have shared responsibility to end conflict
  • Grundberg said the beginning of his tenure should be used as a moment to reassess responsibilities
  • He condemned the Houthis for their continued advance on Marib in which thousands of Yemenis have lost their lives

NEW YORK: The UN and the international community has a “shared responsibility” to end the conflict raging in Yemen, the UN special envoy for the country said on Friday.

Delivering his first briefing to the Security Council in his capacity as the new UN special envoy for Yemen, Hans Grundberg said that the beginning of his tenure should be used as a moment “to reassess our respective responsibilities.”

“The initiatives from Yemen’s neighbors and members of the Security Council in support of the UN’s efforts have been appreciated and will need to be continued,” Grundberg warned.

The Swedish diplomat said his first consultations with Yemeni, regional and international actors “will soon start,” and that he will “shortly travel to Riyadh to meet with President Hadi and other members” of the Yemeni government.

Grundberg said he also looked forward to meeting with the Houthi leadership and “other Sanaa based actors, as well as other political actors throughout Yemen.”

He added that he and his team are prepared to spend as much time in Yemen and with Yemenis as possible.

“I will return to the Security Council each month to reflect frankly and openly on these discussions. And I will seek your tangible and coordinated support to take my mandate forward,” he added.

Grundberg said that he would also meet with regional leaders in Riyadh, Muscat, Abu Dhabi, Kuwait, Tehran, Cairo and elsewhere as part of his efforts to achieve peace in Yemen.

He condemned the Houthis for their continued advance on Marib “in which thousands of young Yemenis have lost their lives.”

He added that the UN and the international community has been clear in urging the militia to stop the offensive.


Arab coalition says 95 Houthis killed in strikes on Juba and Al-Kasarah

Arab coalition says 95 Houthis killed in strikes on Juba and Al-Kasarah
Updated 5 sec ago

Arab coalition says 95 Houthis killed in strikes on Juba and Al-Kasarah

Arab coalition says 95 Houthis killed in strikes on Juba and Al-Kasarah
RIYADH: The Arab coalition said on Thursday that 95 Houthis were killed during air strikes on two districts near the central Yemeni city of Marib.
The coalition added that 11 military vehicles had also been destroyed in the 22 strikes carried out on Juba and Al-Kasarah during the last 24 hours.
Juba is some 50 km south of Marib, whilst Al-Kasarah is 30 km northwest of the city.
The coalition has reported heavy strikes around Marib in recent weeks.
Earlier on Thursday, the Arab coalition intercepted and destroyed five Houthi ballistic missiles fired toward the southwestern Saudi city of Jazan.

UN calls on Sudan’s military to restore civilian-led government

UN calls on Sudan’s military to restore civilian-led government
Updated 38 min 43 sec ago

UN calls on Sudan’s military to restore civilian-led government

UN calls on Sudan’s military to restore civilian-led government
  • The council called for the immediate release of all those detained by the military authorities
  • Statement is the product of days of laborious talks among council members and was watered down under pressure from Russia

UNITED NATIONS, United States: The UN Security Council called Thursday on Sudan’s new military rulers to restore the civilian-led government that they toppled this week.
The council passed unanimously a statement that expressed “serious concern” about the coup Monday in the poverty-stricken African nation which has enjoyed only rare periods of democracy since gaining independence in 1956.
The council called for the immediate release of all those detained by the military authorities and urged “all stakeholders to engage in dialogue without pre-conditions.”
The British-drafted statement is the product of days of laborious talks among council members and was watered down under pressure from Russia. The council met in an urgent session Tuesday after the putsch.
The statement expresses concern over the “suspension of some transitional institutions, the declaration of a state of emergency” and the detention of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. He was taken Monday by the military and is now under guard at his home, where he was moved after an international outcry. Other ministers remain under full military arrest, however.
One diplomat said that, at the insistence of China, the text notes explicitly that Hamdok did return home on Tuesday evening. But the UN maintains that it considers him as being denied freedom of movement.
The discussions among the Security Council members came against a backdrop of a renewed struggle between Western nations and Russia for influence in Sudan.
A first draft statement floated early this week condemned the coup “in the strongest terms” but this wording was eventually dropped.
In the version that was ultimately adopted, the council “called upon all parties to exercise the utmost restraint, refrain from the use of violence and emphasized the importance of full respect for human rights, including the right to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression.”


US sanctions two Lebanese businessmen and a member of parliament

US sanctions two Lebanese businessmen and a member of parliament
Updated 24 min 36 sec ago

US sanctions two Lebanese businessmen and a member of parliament

US sanctions two Lebanese businessmen and a member of parliament
  • Jihad Al-Arab and Dany Khoury were sanctioned for alleged corruption related to state contracts
  • Lawmaker Jamil Sayyed was sanctioned for allegedly seeking to transfer $120 million abroad

BEIRUT: The US Treasury on Thursday imposed sanctions on two top Lebanese contractors and a lawmaker close to the Hezbollah movement over alleged large-scale corruption that undermined the rule of law in Lebanon.
Businessmen Jihad Al-Arab and Dany Khoury, close to former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Al-Hariri and Christian politician Gebran Bassil respectively, were sanctioned for alleged corruption related to state contracts.
Lawmaker Jamil Sayyed was sanctioned for allegedly seeking to “skirt domestic banking policies and regulations” and transfer $120 million abroad, “presumably to enrich himself and his associates,” a Treasury statement said. 


Lebanon, Syria and Jordan reach final deal to transfer electricity, ministers say

Lebanon, Syria and Jordan reach final deal to transfer electricity, ministers say
Updated 30 min 51 sec ago

Lebanon, Syria and Jordan reach final deal to transfer electricity, ministers say

Lebanon, Syria and Jordan reach final deal to transfer electricity, ministers say
  • The World Bank would finance the deal, Lebanese energy minister Walid Fayad said
  • Lebanon is suffering from an acute energy crisis

BEIRUT: Lebanon, Syria and Jordan have reached a final deal to transfer electricity to Lebanon which is suffering an acute energy crisis, ministers from the three neighboring countries said in a joint news conference on Thursday.
The World Bank attended a joint meeting for the participating countries and would finance the deal, Lebanese energy minister Walid Fayad said.
"The Americans have given the green light to the project," he added.


Turkey’s Lake Tuz dries up due to climate change, farming

Turkey’s Lake Tuz dries up due to climate change, farming
Updated 28 October 2021

Turkey’s Lake Tuz dries up due to climate change, farming

Turkey’s Lake Tuz dries up due to climate change, farming
KONYA, Turkey: For centuries, Lake Tuz in central Turkey has hosted huge colonies of flamingos that migrate and breed there when the weather is warm, feeding on algae in the lake’s shallow waters.
This summer, however, a heart-wrenching scene replaced the usual splendid sunset images of the birds captured by wildlife photographer Fahri Tunc. Carcasses of flamingo hatchlings and adults scattered across the cracked, dried-up lake bed.
The 1,665 square kilometer (643 square mile) lake — Turkey’s second-largest lake and home to several bird species — has entirely receded this year. Experts say Lake Tuz (Salt Lake in Turkish) is a victim of climate change-induced drought, which has hit the region hard, and decades of harmful agricultural policies that exhausted the underground water supply.
“There were about 5,000 young flamingos. They all perished because there was no water,” said Tunc, who also heads the regional branch of the Turkish environmental group Doga Dernegi. “It was an incredibly bad scene. It’s not something I can erase from my life. I hope I do not come across such a scene again.”
Several other lakes across Turkey have similarly dried up or have receded to alarming levels, affected by low precipitation and unsustainable irrigation practices. Climate experts warn that the entire Mediterranean basin, which includes Turkey, is particularly at risk of severe drought and desertification.
In Lake Van, Turkey’s largest lake, located in the country’s east, fishing boats no longer could approach a dock last week after the water fell to unusual levels, HaberTurk television reported.
”(We have) rising temperatures and decreasing rain, and on the other side, the water needs for irrigation in agriculture,” said Levent Kurnaz, a scientist at Bogazici University’s Center for Climate Change and Policy Studies. “It’s a bad situation all over Turkey at the moment.”
A study based on satellite imagery conducted by Turkey’s Ege University shows that water levels at Lake Tuz started to drop beginning in 2000, according to Turkey’s state-run Anadolu Agency. The lake completely receded this year due to rising temperatures, intensified evaporation and insufficient rain, according to the study.
The study also noted a sharp decline in underground water levels around Lake Tuz, a hypersaline lake that straddles the Turkish provinces of Ankara, Konya and Aksaray.
The Konya basin in central Anatolia, which includes Lake Tuz, was once known as Turkey’s breadbasket. Farms in the region have turned to growing profitable but water-intensive crops such as corn, sugar-beet and alfalfa, which have drained groundwater supplies, photographer Tunc said. Farmers have dug thousands of unlicensed wells while streams feeding the lake have dried up or been diverted, he said.
Environmental groups say poor government agricultural policies play a significant role in the deterioration of Turkey’s lakes.
“If you don’t pay them enough money, the farmers, they will plant whatever is water intensive and will make money for them. And if you just tell them it’s not allowed, then they won’t vote for you in the next election,” Kurnaz said.
The overuse of groundwater is also making the region more susceptible to the formation of sinkholes. Dozens of such depressions have been discovered around Konya’s Karapinar district, including one that Associated Press journalists saw next to a newly harvested alfalfa field.
Tunc, 46, a native of Aksaray, is saddened by the thought that he won’t be able to enjoy the flamingos with his 7-month-old son like he did with his 21-year-old son. He remains hopeful, however, that Lake Tuz may replenish itself, if the government stops the water-intensive agriculture.
Kurnaz, the climate scientist, is less optimistic.
“They keep telling people that they shouldn’t use groundwater for this agriculture and people are not listening. There are about 120,000 unlicensed wells in the region, and everybody is pumping out water as if that water will last forever,” Kurnaz said.
“But if you are on a flat place, it can rain as much as you want and it won’t replenish the groundwater in a short time. It takes maybe thousands of years in central Anatolia to replenish the underground water table,” he added.
The drought and flamingo deaths at Lake Tuz were just one of a series of ecological disasters to strike Turkey this summer, believed to be partly due to climate change.
In July, wildfires devastated swaths of forests along Turkey’s southern coast, killing eight people and forcing thousands to flee. Parts of the country’s northern Black Sea coast were struck by floods that killed 82 people. Earlier, a layer of sea mucilage, blamed on soaring temperatures and poor waste management, covered the Sea of Marmara, threatening marine life.
Although Turkey was among the first countries to sign the 2015 Paris climate agreement, the country held off ratifying it until this month as it sought to be reclassified as a developing country instead of a developed one to avoid harsher emission reduction targets. Turkish lawmakers issued a declaration rejecting the status of developed country at the same time they ratified the climate agreement.
In the town of Eskil, near the shores of Lake Tuz, farmer Cengiz Erkol, 54, checked the irrigation system on his field growing animal feed.
“The waters aren’t running as strong and abundant as they used to,” he said. “I have four children. The future doesn’t look good. Each year is worse than the previous year.”