Overseas Filipino workers left frustrated as Gulf nations stay off Philippines’ COVID-19 green list

Overseas Filipino workers left frustrated as Gulf nations stay off Philippines’ COVID-19 green list
Overseas Filipino workers based in the Gulf region have been left frustrated by the continued exclusion of the nations they work in from the Philippines’ green list. (AFP)
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Updated 14 October 2021

Overseas Filipino workers left frustrated as Gulf nations stay off Philippines’ COVID-19 green list

Overseas Filipino workers left frustrated as Gulf nations stay off Philippines’ COVID-19 green list
  • The Philippines’ pandemic task force updates protocols for Filipinos arriving from green-list countries

DUBAI: The Philippine government is to ease coronavirus disease (COVID-19) quarantine rules relating to green-list countries, allowing millions of its citizens to return home for the first time in two years.

But despite the announcement, overseas Filipino workers based in the Gulf region have been left frustrated by the continued exclusion of the nations they work in from the Philippines’ green list.

The Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases on Wednesday updated protocols for fully vaccinated Filipinos and foreign nationals traveling from green-listed countries, doing away with mandatory quarantine as long as they present negative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test results within 72 hours before their departure.

OFWs must also produce a national digital certificate from the foreign government where they were vaccinated to validate their COVID-19 inoculation status.

The Philippines’ pandemic task force previously directed fully vaccinated individuals from green-list countries to undergo facility-based quarantine until the release of their negative RT-PCR test taken on their fifth day upon arrival.

A number of OFWs, who would only give their first names, spoke to Arab News about the latest developments.

Roselyn, an office worker from Abu Dhabi, said: “I want to go home (to the Philippines), but I cannot understand why fully vaccinated Filipinos like me still have to take long quarantine periods because the UAE – which has now very low daily COVID-19 cases – remains excluded from the green list.”

Melissa, who teaches at a government college in Bahrain, said: “I have plans to go home this December, but the short two-week semestral break makes it not advisable to make the trip since Bahrain remains out of the green list.”

Countries and jurisdictions on the Philippines’ green list include American Samoa, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, the Cayman Islands, Chad, mainland China, New Zealand, Niger, Taiwan, North Korea, Sudan, Syria, Tonga, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Uzbekistan, and Yemen.

Other countries and jurisdictions, including those in the Middle East, not on the green list are automatically included on the yellow list – which requires institutional quarantine. Only Bermuda is on the red list, from where travelers are prohibited entry.

Dr. Shammah, an optometry doctor working in Kuwait, said she was optimistic that the Philippines would soon lift travel restrictions for OFWs in the Gulf. “There is already about 99 percent herd immunity (in Kuwait) and Kuwait is now on phase five of booster shots for residents and citizens,” she added.

Marge, an office manager for an Abu Dhabi-based engineering consultancy, said other countries with far worse COVID-19 situations than the Philippines had opened up to travelers.

“I would really like to know why the Philippine government continues to exclude the UAE, Saudi Arabia, and other Gulf countries from its green list when COVID-19 cases in these countries have drastically gone down.

“Why are they very strict in implementing travel protocols for OFWs from the Middle East? Some have not gone home for years. Imagine the effect on the mental well-being of Filipinos who must deal not only with the strict travel protocols but also expensive flight tickets and flights getting cancelled multiple times,” she added.

And she pointed out that her partner, who works in Saudi Arabia, had seen round-trip flight tickets from Dammam to Manila rise to around SR8,000 ($2,133).

“The Philippine government should heed the clamor of OFWs, especially those from the Middle East, as most of them are not only fully vaccinated but have taken booster shots,” she said.


Date set for Iran nuclear talks

Date set for Iran nuclear talks
Updated 14 sec ago

Date set for Iran nuclear talks

Date set for Iran nuclear talks
  • EU diplomatic chief Josep Borrell said at the weekend he was ready to meet Iranian leaders
  • The 2015 deal collapsed in 2018 when the US pulled out and President Donald Trump reimposed sanctions

JEDDAH: Talks aimed at reviving the collapsed Iran nuclear deal will resume this week, two Iranian members of parliament said on Sunday.

After a private meeting with Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian, MP Ahmad Alirezabeigui said “talks with the 4+1 Group will restart on Thursday in Brussels.” Another Iranian MP, Behrouz Mohebbi Najmabadi, said negotiations would resume “this week.”

The 4+1 Group consists of four UN Security Council permanent members — Britain, China, France and Russia — and Germany. They began negotiations with Iran in Vienna in April over reviving the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the agreement with world powers to curb Iran’s nuclear program in return for lifting economic sanctions.

That deal collapsed in 2018 when the US pulled out and President Donald Trump reimposed sanctions, and Iran responded by breaching the deal’s restrictions on its enrichment of uranium.

Trump’s successor Joe Biden is keen to revive the deal and the US is taking part indirectly in the Vienna talks. However, discussions have been suspended since June in a stalemate over who concedes first — Iran by complying with the agreement, or the US by lifting sanctions. US allies in the Gulf, including Saudi Arabia, are also concerned that the agreement fails to address wider issues such as Iran’s ballistic missiles and its malign regional activities.

EU diplomatic chief Josep Borrell said at the weekend he was ready to meet Iranian leaders. “The goal remains to resume negotiations in Vienna as quickly as possible,” his spokesman said.


Unvaccinated government employees to be banned from entering workplace, says Egyptian PM

Unvaccinated government employees to be banned from entering workplace, says Egyptian PM
Updated 17 October 2021

Unvaccinated government employees to be banned from entering workplace, says Egyptian PM

Unvaccinated government employees to be banned from entering workplace, says Egyptian PM
  • Health minister announced a second arrival of 1.6 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine at Cairo airport
  • The doses were provided by the US through the global COVAX initiative

CAIRO: Unvaccinated government employees will be banned from entering their workplace, Egyptian Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly said, as the health minister spoke of the quantity and variety of jabs available and the expansion of specialist centers administering them.

“It must be ensured that all workers in the administrative authorities of the governorates are vaccinated, and soon any employee who has not been vaccinated will not be allowed to enter, especially with the wide availability of vaccines,” he told a meeting.

He called for awareness campaigns in governorates explaining the importance of vaccines, especially since the Ministry of Health was ready to provide any required quantity during this stage.

“We have 60.5 million doses of vaccines and, by the end of this month, the number of available vaccines will reach 70 million," said Dr. Hala Zayed, who is the minister of health and population. 

She acknowledged the importance of awareness campaigns and in taking the necessary measures to encourage citizens to get jabbed.

She said the number of vaccination centers had been increased and that, in the coming period, they would be established in areas frequented by citizens. These locations would include courts, traffic departments, metro stations, trains, and in front of mosques and churches on Fridays and Sundays.

The centers were for any governorate that requested them and the goal was to vaccinate citizens quickly.

Zayed said Egypt had started manufacturing vaccines and that, starting next week, the manufacturing technology would be transferred from its Chinese partner.

She also announced a second arrival of 1.6 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine at Cairo International Airport, provided by the US through the global COVAX initiative.

Khaled Megahed, from the ministry, said the Pfizer vaccine had approval for use from both the World Health Organization and the Egyptian Drug Authority.

The shipment of vaccines received would be analyzed in the authority’s laboratories before being distributed to 1,100 vaccination centers.

The first shipment of Pfizer vaccines, also 1.6 million doses, was received last September as part of a series of shipments provided by the US to Egypt.


Arab coalition: 165 Houthis killed, 10 military vehicles destroyed in Abedia

Arab coalition: 165 Houthis killed, 10 military vehicles destroyed in Abedia
Updated 17 October 2021

Arab coalition: 165 Houthis killed, 10 military vehicles destroyed in Abedia

Arab coalition: 165 Houthis killed, 10 military vehicles destroyed in Abedia
  • The US has called on the Houthis to stop their offensive on Marib
  • The coalition announced on Saturday that it had killed 160 Houthis and destroyed 11 military vehicles in Abedia

RIYADH: The Arab coalition said on Sunday that 165 Houthis had been killed and ten military vehicles destroyed in operations in Marib’s Abedia district.

The coalition said it had carried out 41 operations targeting Houthis in Abedia and surrounding villages during the last 24 hours.

Abedia is a district in Yemen’s Marib which has been under a Houthi siege since Sept. 23, hindering the movement of civilians and impeding humanitarian aid flows.

The Houthis continue to carry out their terrorist operations against civilians and prevent medical aid from reaching patients in Abedia, the coalition said.

On Saturday, the US called on the Houthis to stop their offensive on Marib, and listen to the urgent calls from across Yemen and the international community to bring this conflict to an end and support a UN-led inclusive peace process.

“The Houthis are obstructing movement of people and humanitarian aid, preventing essential services from reaching the 35,000 residents of Abedia,” a US State Department statement said.

“The US urges the Houthis to immediately permit safe passage for civilians, life-saving aid, and the wounded. As the UN stated this week, it stands ready with its partners to provide this much needed assistance to the people of Marib,” the statement added.

The coalition announced on Saturday that it had killed 160 Houthis and destroyed 11 military vehicles in similar operations in Abedia.


Syrian constitutional committee agrees to start drafting constitutional reform: UN envoy

Syrian constitutional committee agrees to start drafting constitutional reform: UN envoy
Updated 17 October 2021

Syrian constitutional committee agrees to start drafting constitutional reform: UN envoy

Syrian constitutional committee agrees to start drafting constitutional reform: UN envoy
  • Syrian government and opposition co-chair meeting for first time, agree to launch process for drafting constitutional reform
  • Pedersen says the Syrian Constitutional Committee is an important contribution to the political process but will not be able to solve the political crisis itself

BEIRUT: Syria’s government and opposition in the war-torn country have agreed to start drafting constitutional reforms, the UN Syria envoy announced Sunday, a major step after a nine-month hiatus of talks and several fruitless rounds.
UN special envoy for Syria Geir Pedersen didn’t say what was behind the agreement or offer details of what comes next. The drafting sessions formally begin Monday.
Pedersen met Sunday with the co-chairs of a committee which includes figures from fourth-term President Bashar Assad’s government, as well as exiles and civil society representatives. The two sat together for the first time to discuss how to proceed, and plans for the week ahead, Pedersen said.
Thirty representatives divided between the two sides, along with 15 members of civil society, will be meeting with Pedersen in Geneva until Friday.
“I have been negotiating between the parties to establish a consensus on how we are going to move forward. I am very pleased to say we have reached such consensus,” Pedersen told reporters, appealing to all parties to maintain the spirit.
“My appeal for the 45 (members) is that we work as we have agreed to, and that we now start the drafting process of the constitutional committee,” he said.
The last round of talks ended in January without progress. Pedersen announced late September an agreement on “methodology” for a sixth round. It’s based on three pillars: respect for rules of procedure, the submission of texts of “basic constitutional principles” ahead of the meeting, and regular meetings of the co-chairs with him before and during the meeting.
Syria’s 10-year conflict has killed over 350,000 people and displaced half the country’s pre-war 23 million population, including more than 5 million refugees mostly in neighboring countries.
At a Russia-hosted Syrian peace conference in January 2018, an agreement was reached to form a 150-member committee to draft a new constitution.
The 2012 United Nations’ road map to peace in Syria calls for the drafting of a new constitution and ends with UN-supervised elections with all Syrians, including members of the diaspora, eligible to participate.
After the fifth round of negotiations failed in late January, Pedersen hinted the Syrian government delegation was to blame for the lack of progress.
The United States and several Western allies accused Assad of deliberately stalling and delaying the drafting of a new constitution until after presidential elections to avoid a UN-supervised vote, as called for by the Security Council.
In late May, Assad was re-elected in what the government called a landslide for a fourth seven-year term. The West and his opposition described the election as illegitimate and a sham.
Pedersen said the need for “a genuine intra-Syrian dialogue” was reportedly discussed by Assad and Russian President Vladimir Putin recently in Moscow, “and through this, a genuine process of Syrian political reform.”


Jordan says no current plans to operate flights to Syria

Jordan says no current plans to operate flights to Syria
Updated 17 October 2021

Jordan says no current plans to operate flights to Syria

Jordan says no current plans to operate flights to Syria

CAIRO: Jordan’s Civil Aviation Regulatory Commission said that there are no current plans to operate flights between Jordan and Syria, state news agency PETRA reported on Sunday.
Jordan’s state carrier, Royal Jordanian, said in September it would resume direct flights to Damascus for the first time in nearly a decade, in what would have been the latest step to restore extensive business ties with Syria.

More to follow...