From Beyonce to singer Tinashe, Arab label Marzook snaps up celebrity fans

From Beyonce to singer Tinashe, Arab label Marzook snaps up celebrity fans
Tinashe is a songwriter, dancer, record producer and actress. (Getty Images)
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Updated 19 October 2021

From Beyonce to singer Tinashe, Arab label Marzook snaps up celebrity fans

From Beyonce to singer Tinashe, Arab label Marzook snaps up celebrity fans

DUBAI: Kuwaiti label Marzook is continuing to snap up celebrity fans, with US singer Tinashe and superstar Beyonce spotted sporting its curved creations in recent days.

Tinashe, famous for her hit song “2 On,” showed off a pill-shaped bag by the brand during a photoshoot for A Book Of digital and print magazine this month.

The singer was photographed in a retro look, complete with a white hairband, larger-than-life hair and a sleek cat eye. Styled by Wilford Lenov, the ensemble featured a glittering Marzook bag called the Pill Dusty Pink.

Meanwhile, Beyonce was photographed with the Kuwaiti arm candy in Italy over the weekend.

The world-famous singer was photographed outside Alexandre Arnault’s wedding to Geraldine Guyot in Venice, Italy, on Saturday. Guyot is the founder of the French brand D’Estrëe, while Arnault is the son of one of the world’s richest men, LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault, and the executive vice president of product and communications at Tiffany & Co.




The singer showed off a bag by Marzook during a recent photoshoot for A Book Of magazine. (Instagram)

For the occasion, Beyoncé opted for a Tiffany-blue silk gown and heels with a Dolce & Gabbana double-breasted wool coat. She accessorized the look with a Marzook crystal orb purse and Lorraine Schwartz diamond jewelry.

Helmed by Kuwaiti siblings Fahad and Shouq Al-Marzooq, the Beirut-based accessories brand was established in 2014. The brother sister duo started off in the fashion industry by designing pieces for their family and friends and quickly went on to garner worldwide attention and sign celebrity collaboration deals.

In 2019, US influencer and model Sofia Richie, singer Lionel Richie’s daughter, collaborated on a new line of handbags with the label.  

 “When you’re one of social media’s most popular style stars, your style influence is extremely crucial.  Sofia’s style is very much aligned with the Marzook girl, who rather than follows trends, creates trends,” the fashion label wrote on its website at the time.

The collaboration featured Marzook’s perennial favorite, the spherical Lucid Classic bag, in a new set of neon shades — “Powerful Pink, Neon- Z Green and Traffic Cone Orange.”

And those are not the only celebrities who have shown love for the Arab brand.

Kylie Jenner showed off a crystal-covered orb bag by the label on her birthday in 2018, triggering many a newspaper headline.

The accessories house’s bags have been sported by the likes of human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, actress Lupita Nyong’o and model Cara Delevingne.

The label’s line of accessories consists of exotic leather and skins, precious metals and resins in pill or spherical shapes.


UNHCR ambassador Karen Wazen meets with victims of Beirut blast in Lebanon

UNHCR ambassador Karen Wazen meets with victims of Beirut blast in Lebanon
Updated 23 sec ago

UNHCR ambassador Karen Wazen meets with victims of Beirut blast in Lebanon

UNHCR ambassador Karen Wazen meets with victims of Beirut blast in Lebanon

DUBAI: Karen Wazen Bakhazi has joined hands with the UN refugee agency, UNCHR, to support her native Lebanon.

The Dubai-based social media influencer was named as a High Profile Supporter of UNHCR last year for her dedication and commitment to raising awareness of the plight of refugees and displaced populations across the region over the past three years. The title was officially given to Wazen at a signing ceremony held at the UNHCR offices in International Humanitarian City, Dubai.

The style icon and entrepreneur, who launched her successful eyewear company in 2018,  has been on numerous field missions in support of the refugee cause over the past three years. Most recently, the humanitarian visited Beirut to meet with families who have been affected by the devastating Aug. 4 explosion.

“It is always a honor to work closely with the UNHCR and see first-hand the effort and work that is done towards vulnerable families in our communities,” wrote Wazen on Instagram, alongside a carousel of images.

“Yesterday I visited and engaged with a Lebanese family that was deeply affected by the Beirut blast and economic situation and it is so heartbreaking to hear of all the injustices that unfortunately are very present in our world,” she added.

“Many people think that the @unhcr_arabic only helps refugees. But in fact, UNHCR also provides a lot of support to host communities in Lebanon and to Lebanese families directly.

“It’s so painful to face the reality of some of the families suffering in Lebanon and in our region. I wish the world would come together to make a difference by raising awareness, listening out for each other and donating whenever possible.”

On Aug. 4, 2020, a massive explosion ripped through the port area of Beirut, killing at least 73 people and injuring thousands. The giant blast, which was felt 264 km away in Cyprus, sent shockwaves throughout the city, shattering windows and blowing off balconies on apartment buildings. The mushroom-like explosion caused widespread damage, destroying much of the capital.

Following the horrific blast, the Lebanese social media icon donated $10,000 via her eyewear company, Karen Wazen Eyewear, to the Beirut Eye & ENT Spec Hospital (BESH) to help the thousands of people who were injured during the explosion.


Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day

Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day
Updated 26 November 2021

Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day

Italian label Loro Piana collaborates with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej for UAE National Day

DUBAI: Italian brand Loro Piana has unveiled an artistic collaboration with Emirati artist Mattar Bin Lahej in celebration of the UAE’s 50th National Day.

The partnership features 50 limited-edition Loro Piana cashmere plaids, each signed and numbered by the painter.

The brand hosted a gala dinner on Tuesday at Dubai’s Etihad Museum. (Supplied)

For the collaboration, Bin Lahej reimagined the UAE National Anthem using his own Arabic font, Mattar.

He also created a 5.5-meter-tall, stainless-steel sculpture, “Constitution,” that was unveiled during a gala dinner on Tuesday at Dubai’s Etihad Museum.

Bin Lahej created a 5.5-meter-tall, stainless-steel sculpture. (Supplied)

Speaking at the event, Loro Piana’s chief executive officer, Damien Bertrand, said: “The plaid is, for Loro Piana, very precious and unique. It perfectly embodies the memorable touch of Loro Piana, which is at the core of the brand. A unique touch which is a result of a unique craftsmanship.”

Bertrand also announced that the fashion label was partnering with the Emirates Red Crescent to supply winter clothing for Syrian refugees in the charity’s Jordan camp.

The event featured performances by Laura Marzadori, first violinist of the Teatro alla Scala, joined by the string section of the National Symphony Orchestra. (Supplied)

In her address to dinner guests, Emirates Red Crescent marketing director, Reef Al-Khajeh, said: “The UAE has been known as a generous and caring nation. This collaboration is a demonstration of how deep rooted the culture of giving is embedded.

“The Emirates Red Crescent is constantly acting and reacting to the urgent needs of people affected by misfortune all around the world, and our partnership with Loro Piana will complement the efforts we make to provide relief to those forced into shelters and facing extreme conditions due to disasters and emergencies,” she added. 

The event featured performances by Laura Marzadori, first violinist of the Teatro alla Scala, joined by the string section of the National Symphony Orchestra. The dinner was made by Italian Michelin-starred chef Niko Romito, who joined forces with Emirati pastry chef Sahar Parham Al-Awadhi to serve a culinary ode to Italy and the seven Emirates.


Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020

Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020
Updated 26 November 2021

Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020

Alicia Keys to perform at Dubai’s Expo 2020

DUBAI: US hitmaker Alicia Keys will be the first international artist to perform as part of Expo 2020 Dubai’s Infinite Nights series on Dec. 10, organizers announced on Friday.

The 15-time Grammy Award-winner will give fans a glimpse of her new double album, “Keys.”

“Performing in Expo 2020 Dubai’s Infinite Nights series is going to be such an incredible experience,” said Keys in a released statement. “I’m so excited to share such a beautifully unique and special performance on the eve of the release of my new album ‘Keys’ with the world.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alicia Keys (@aliciakeys)

“‘Keys’ is all about letting go of anything that holds you back and breaking through the invisible ceilings above us! It perfectly reflects Expo’s values. I cannot wait to unlock this new universe with you,” she said.

The show will be live-streamed for supporters around the world on www.virtualexpodubai.com, and available to watch across multiple channels, including Expo TV on YouTube and Facebook.

Lubna Haroun, vice president of Expo 2020’s headline talent guest group owner Moment-Makers, said in a statement: “After the incredible success of our Arab artists in October and November, we are excited to bring Alicia Keys to Expo 2020 to headline our Infinite Nights series.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alicia Keys (@aliciakeys)

“Expo 2020 and Alicia share the belief that people’s creativity and diversity should be celebrated, that everyone has the opportunity to fulfill their dreams and shine. We are looking forward to a show that inspires and delights our audiences,” she added.

Infinite Nights is a series of events taking place until March 31, welcoming visitors to celebrate human creativity, innovation, progress and culture.

Arab celebrities that performed so far include Iraqi singer Kadim Al-Saher and Lebanese stars Nancy Ajram and Ragheb Alama.


Ignition time: ‘The Fastest’ introduces regional racers to the world

Ignition time: ‘The Fastest’ introduces regional racers to the world
Updated 26 November 2021

Ignition time: ‘The Fastest’ introduces regional racers to the world

Ignition time: ‘The Fastest’ introduces regional racers to the world
  • The new Netflix reality show represents a huge opportunity for some of the best drivers in the Middle East

DUBAI: All Syrian racecar driver Bushra Nasr knew, as she drove her beloved car far into the Abu Dhabi desert, was that she would be taking part in a race. She knew there would be cameras, and that whatever happened there might end up airing somewhere in the region.

It wasn’t until later that Nasr, along with the nine other racers from across the region that had gathered there on an abandoned airstrip, learned they were secretly participating in Netflix’s first Arabic-language unscripted reality series entitled “The Fastest.” It was an opportunity that could potentially change each of their lives.

“Honestly, the whole thing was a complete surprise. I thought we might participate in just one race. Then, every day they would come and tell us where we would go next, and without any warning we would take off to different races and different challenges, all unique and different and unlike anything we’d done before,” Nasr tells Arab News. “The entire experience was very exotic.”

Bushra Nasr is a Syrian racecar driver. (Supplied)

For years, Nasr has been pursuing her love of cars and racing in her every spare moment, spending weekends steadily building her profile on the track, winning competitions and earning respect of the region’s drivers one by one — even the men who never imagined a young woman would be able to surpass them.

But her dreams were not just about winning races. They went much further. Nasr harbored the secret hope that fate might one day allow her to become the next Jeremy Clarkson, the erstwhile host of the famed show “Top Gear,” someday.

With “The Fastest,” she and her fellow contestants may finally have a way to achieve their goals, and the worlds of possibility that the show’s potential success could open to them are now on each of their minds. Nasr is not focused solely on herself, however. Her focus is on all the young women that she hopes can be inspired by her success in the show, as well as her fellow female contestants.

The contestants say they have forged real friendships with each other since the competition concluded. (Supplied)

“The whole experience was amazing for us as women, and it will show the world how many women feel passionate about this sport and hopefully help others feel motivated too. I hope the whole thing can act as an inspiration for young women to be more and more involved in racing,” says Nasr.

While competition was fierce throughout the first season of “The Fastest,” Nasr’s success in the series was a joy to watch for her competitors, including seasoned Saudi driver Abzulaziz Al-Ya’eesh — a fellow finalist.

“The most memorable part of this show, to be honest, was seeing Bushra (succeed) with her unique and challenging spirit. The show proved that racing not only depends on the car, it depends on the driver’s skills and expertise. By having such varied men and women competing on a level playing field shows how much the sport is expanding in very different circles. (We are) people who came from across the Middle East to share our passion for cars,” says Al- Ya’eesh.

For Saudi contestant Abzulaziz Fudhili, what excited him most when he found out “The Fastest” would be available in 190 countries on the world’s biggest streaming platform was that it could show the world the true passion for racing in the region. (Supplied)

While the Middle East’s reputation as a global hub for car culture grows by the year, it is more than just a home to some of the most impressive collections of supercars past and present. There are enthusiasts from all backgrounds, who have all come to the track from a very different, and often bumpy, path.

For Saudi contestant Abzulaziz Fudhili, what excited him most when he found out “The Fastest” would be available in 190 countries on the world’s biggest streaming platform was that it could show the world the true passion for racing in the region. Fudhili is a prime example of that. He borrowed money from almost everyone he knew to buy his car, and his achievements on the track are allowing him to pay them back.

“I couldn't believe that we would be seen all over. Not only were we going to race, we could show the world that the Middle East motorsport scene is a force to be reckoned with,” Fudhili says. “The world knows we love cars like no one else, but they have never seen the heart we bring behind the wheel.”

Nasr’s success in the series was a joy to watch for her competitors, including seasoned Saudi driver Abzulaziz Al-Ya’eesh — a fellow finalist. (Supplied)

“The Fastest” is no amateur competition though. It involved some of the best racers in the region, such as second-generation Kuwaiti racer Ali Makhseed, who only agreed to join the show once he was certain the competition would equal anything he’s found in the region’s premiere races.

“I had second thoughts about joining the show,” says Makhseed. “I’m a professional driver, and I thought it was going to be just a bunch of enthusiasts and fans, not people who really knew street racing. But when I saw some racers I had known for years on that track, I was relieved, and the competition they brought struck a fire in me.”

The show’s six-episode first season is hosted by Saudi YouTube star Tareq Al-Harbi, (aka 6ar8o), whose comedic stylings have gained him more than one million subscribers and almost 10 million Instagram followers.

For Al-Harbi, even though he did not race, hosting the show was a life-long aspiration fulfilled. He could finally be a part of a show that he felt was as good as anything any other country had made, and that never felt like an imitation — a show that was truly the region’s own.

Kuwaiti racer Ali Makhseed only agreed to join the show once he was certain the competition would equal anything he’s found in the region’s premiere races. (Supplied)

“Having an Arabic-language show that is so well made and suspenseful is a fantasy for Arab viewers,” Al-Harbi says. “You won’t be able to predict the winner until the last minute. I think people aren’t going to be able to stop watching this show, and that makes me incredibly proud.”

Despite his enormous success, Al-Harbi considers “The Fastest” perhaps his greatest personal achievement.

“It has been an incredible journey for me,” he says. “I still remember how hard it was when I started off. I am thrilled to reach this level. I also think of it as a big responsibility for me.”

The contestants say they have forged real friendships with each other since the competition concluded — trading racing tips, helping each other with their cars, and reliving some of their favorite moments on the track against each other and the lessons they learned about themselves.

“The experience overall was an education to me, and I’d be happy to be part of this again,” says Al-Ya’eesh. “I will make sure to be prepared with my car and learn more about each driver, so that no one can beat me next time.”


Max von Oppenheim: The little-known history of a German spy in the Gulf 

Max von Oppenheim: The little-known history of a German spy in the Gulf 
Updated 26 November 2021

Max von Oppenheim: The little-known history of a German spy in the Gulf 

Max von Oppenheim: The little-known history of a German spy in the Gulf 

DUBAI: In the spring of 1893, the German diplomat and archaeologist Max von Oppenheim embarked on an expedition from Damascus to Basra. The journey would take him through the Syrian desert and south through Mesopotamia to the Arabian Gulf. In total, he would travel more than 1,200 kilometers.

Along the way, Oppenheim kept a meticulous record of everything he saw. He took photographs, mapped the landscape, collected material on the Bedouin, and built up biographical portraits of the people he encountered. He would later say: “In the course of this expedition, I came to love the wild, unconstrained life of the sons of the desert.”

Oppenheim’s record of his journey would lead to the publication of “Vom Mittelmeer zum Persischen Golf,” a two-volume account of his travels through the Hauran (southern Syria and northern Jordan), the Syrian desert, and modern-day Iraq. A remarkable historical document, the first edition was published between 1899 and 1900 by Dietrich Reimer (Ernst Vohsen) and has remained a key source for the understanding of the region for 120 years.

This picture shows the interior of a damascene house. (Supplied)

“Both the book’s remarkably thorough and detailed content and its rarity make it a compelling and sought-after work,” says Duncan McCoshan, a cataloguer at London-based rare book dealer Peter Harrington. “These are very handsomely produced volumes that, for a commercial publication, spared no expense.”

As well as two “genuinely impressive” large folding maps by the German cartographer Richard Kiepert, the work contains a series of stunning photographs, about a third of which are by the renowned German photographer Hermann Burchardt, although he goes uncredited. During the course of his career Oppenheim often took photographs himself, but he also travelled with a team of professionals, including the British film pioneer Robert Paul and the German photographer Waldemar Titzenthaler.

The two volumes — copies of which were brought to the Sharjah International Book Fair by Peter Harrington earlier this month — were printed at a time when publishers were experimenting with various techniques of binding, illustrating and decorating books, says McCoshan. “The results of these innovations can be spectacular, as with this set, when the book survives in sharp condition. However, many of these improvements mean that the book can easily become tired – the lettering and decorative ‘blocking’ can wear off, and the multiple plates bound in tend to weaken the binding, becoming loose.

This picture shows a courtyard of a damascene house. (Supplied)

“This is particularly so in the case of key reference titles like this which came in for quite a lot of serious use over an extended period. Then the superb, highly detailed maps are loose in pockets, so that they can be removed, laid out flat and studied closely; and maybe borrowed and perhaps never returned. It is far from common in any condition, but to find it bright, tight, and complete as it is here is very unusual indeed.”

Despite the value of his work, Oppenheim was a controversial figure. He had originally trained as a lawyer, held various consular and diplomatic postings, and later became an archaeologist. Arguably his greatest archaeological achievement would be the discovery and excavation of the Neolithic site of Tell Halaf in north-eastern Syria.

But behind this public persona lay “a rather shadowy figure” who moved through the region as “an adventurer for German imperial ambition.”

Oppenheim’s record of his journey would lead to the publication of “Vom Mittelmeer zum Persischen Golf,” a two-volume account of his travels through the Hauran, the Syrian desert, and modern-day Iraq. (Supplied)

As McCoshan explains, Oppenheim used “archaeology and anthropology as a cover for an attempt to undermine British prestige, much as Lawrence of Arabia was doing on the other side of the coin.” As a consequence, he was known to British intelligence as ‘the Kaiser’s spy.’

“He was seen by the Allied Powers of the First World War as the chief instigator and organizer of jihad, the intention of which was to destabilize the region and draw in troops from Britain and France,” says McCoshan, who first encountered Oppenheim through the works of the British author and historian Peter Hopkirk. “We know about it because British intelligence in the region was always highly suspicious of his activities.”

This is a picture of Druze women in Lebanon. (Supplied)

In 1899, Oppenheim embarked on another journey, this time from Cairo via Aleppo to Damascus and northern Mesopotamia. Ostensibly an expedition to determine possible routes for the Berlin-to-Baghdad railway, of which Deutsche Bank was a primary sponsor, his covert mission was the dissemination of anti-British propaganda and the undermining of British prestige. It was during this trip that he discovered Tell Halaf.

“Oppenheim’s book brings to life the geo-political importance of the region and deepens our understanding of it at the turn of the 20th century,” says McCoshan. Something he achieved “through his painstaking research, his bravura investigations, and his conspicuous sympathy for the peoples of the region, in particular the Bedouin.”