What We Are Reading Today: A Place like No Other by Anthony R. E. Sinclair

What We Are Reading Today: A Place like No Other by Anthony R. E. Sinclair
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Updated 20 October 2021

What We Are Reading Today: A Place like No Other by Anthony R. E. Sinclair

What We Are Reading Today: A Place like No Other by Anthony R. E. Sinclair

With its rich biodiversity, astounding wildlife, and breathtaking animal migrations, Serengeti is like no other ecosystem on the planet. A Place like No Other is Anthony Sinclair’s firsthand account of how he and other scientists discovered the biological principles that regulate life in Serengeti and how they rule all of the natural world.

When Sinclair first began studying this spectacular ecosystem in 1965, a host of questions confronted him. What environmental features make its annual migration possible? What determines the size of animal populations and the stunning diversity of species? What factors enable Serengeti to endure over time? In the five decades that followed, Sinclair and others sought answers. What they learned is that seven principles of regulation govern all natural processes in the Serengeti ecosystem. Sinclair shows how these principles can help us to understand and overcome the challenges facing Serengeti today, and how they can be used to repair damaged habitats throughout the world.


What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency

What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency
Updated 04 December 2021

What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency

What We Are Reading Today: The Government of Emergency

Authors: Stephen J. Collier & Andrew Lakoff

From pandemic disease, to the disasters associated with global warming, to cyberattacks, today we face an increasing array of catastrophic threats. It is striking that, despite the diversity of these threats, experts and officials approach them in common terms — as future events that threaten to disrupt the vital, vulnerable systems upon which modern life depends.
The Government of Emergency tells the story of how this now taken-for-granted way of understanding and managing emergencies arose. Amid the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War, an array of experts and officials working in obscure government offices developed a new understanding of the nation as a complex of vital, vulnerable systems. They invented technical and administrative devices to mitigate the nation’s vulnerability, and organized a distinctive form of emergency government that would make it possible to prepare for and manage potentially catastrophic events.


What We Are Reading Today: Dinopedia by Darren Naish

What We Are Reading Today: Dinopedia by Darren Naish
Updated 03 December 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Dinopedia by Darren Naish

What We Are Reading Today: Dinopedia by Darren Naish

Dinopedia is an illustrated, pocket-friendly encyclopedia of all things dinosaurian. Featuring dozens of entries on topics ranging from hadrosaur nesting colonies to modern fossil hunters and paleontologists such as Halszka Osmólska and Paul Sereno, this amazing A–Z compendium is brimming with facts about these thrilling, complex, and sophisticated animals.

Almost everything we know about dinosaurs has changed in recent decades. A scientific revolution, kick-started in the late 1960s by astounding new discoveries and a succession of new ideas, has shown that these magnificent creatures were marvels of evolution that surpassed modern reptiles and mammals in size, athletic abilities, and more.

Darren Naish sheds invaluable light on our current, fast-changing understanding of dinosaur diversity and evolutionary history, and discusses the cultural impacts of dinosaurs through books, magazines, and movies.


What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik

What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik
Updated 02 December 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik

What We Are Reading Today: Managing Medical Authority by Daniel A. Menchik

Exploring how the authority of medicine is controlled, negotiated, and organized, Managing Medical Authority asks: How is knowledge shared throughout the profession? Who makes decisions when your heart malfunctions—physicians, hospital administrators, or private companies who sell pacemakers? How do physicians gain and keep their influence? Arguing that medicine’s authority is managed in collegial competition across venues, Daniel Menchik examines the full range of stakeholders driving the direction of the field: Medical trainees, clinicians, researchers, administrators, and even the corporations that develop groundbreaking technologies enabling longer and better lives.


What We Are Reading Today: Moving Up without Losing Your Way by Jennifer M. Morton

What We Are Reading Today: Moving Up without Losing Your Way by Jennifer M. Morton
Updated 01 December 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Moving Up without Losing Your Way by Jennifer M. Morton

What We Are Reading Today: Moving Up without Losing Your Way by Jennifer M. Morton

Upward mobility through higher education has been an article of faith for generations of working-class, low-income, and immigrant college students. While this path usually entails financial sacrifices and hard work, little attention has been paid to the personal compromises such students make as they enter worlds vastly different from their own.
Measuring the true cost of higher education for those from disadvantaged backgrounds, Moving Up without Losing Your Way looks at the ethical dilemmas of upward mobility—the broken ties with family and friends, and the loss of community and identity—faced by students as they strive to earn a successful place in society. Drawing upon philosophy, social science, personal stories, and interviews, Jennifer Morton reframes the college experience.


What We Are Reading Today: A Brief History of Time

What We Are Reading Today: A Brief History of Time
Updated 30 November 2021

What We Are Reading Today: A Brief History of Time

What We Are Reading Today: A Brief History of Time

Author: Stephen Hawking

Cosmology is the scientific study involving the origin and expansion of the universe, a branch of astronomy that delves into the stages of life and the structures that bind us into the physical realm.
In “A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes,” English theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking provides an enlightening mixture of philosophy and factual narrative on cosmology in simple language, appealing to the existential nature of the everyday reader.
Published in 1988, the book discusses the physics of the universe, from black holes to string theory, addressing concepts embedded in today’s popular culture.
Hawking’s brilliance in relaying the secrets of the universe shows as he takes the reader on a journey through time and space.
To date, the book has sold over 10 million copies around the world, has been translated into numerous languages, and was a Times of London bestseller for a staggering 237 weeks.