Unvaccinated Emiratis to be banned from leaving UAE starting Jan. 10

Unvaccinated Emiratis to be banned from leaving UAE starting Jan. 10
The UAE aims to continue expanding its nationwide testing to facilitate early detection of coronavirus cases, and carry out the necessary treatment. (File/AFP)
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Updated 01 January 2022

Unvaccinated Emiratis to be banned from leaving UAE starting Jan. 10

Unvaccinated Emiratis to be banned from leaving UAE starting Jan. 10
  • One death has been recorded, the health ministry said
  • The country’s COVID-19 caseload is now at 764,493 with recoveries at 745,963, after 908 patients recovered from the virus in the past 24 hours

DUBAI:  Unvaccinated UAE citizens will be banned from leaving the country starting Jan. 10, the country's foreign ministry and the National Emergency Crisis and Disasters Management Authorities announced.

The UAE on Saturday reached another record high in daily coronavirus infections with 2,556 cases confirmed, state news agency WAM reported.

The country’s COVID-19 caseload is now at 764,493 with recoveries at 745,963, after 908 patients recovered from the virus in the past 24 hours.
One death has been recorded, the health ministry said.

The UAE aims to continue expanding its nationwide testing to facilitate early detection of coronavirus cases, and carry out the necessary treatment, which comes hand-in-hand with its massive vaccination campaign.


UAE minister says youth are main tool for building sustainable future

UAE minister says youth are main tool for building sustainable future
Updated 9 sec ago

UAE minister says youth are main tool for building sustainable future

UAE minister says youth are main tool for building sustainable future

The UAE’s Minister of Culture and Youth, Noura bint Mohammed al-Kaabi, said investing in young people, and empowering them to make a contribution to their countries and communities is the foundation of a nation’s development.
“Youth are the real capital and the main tool in our growth journey to build a sustainable future. In order to prepare them for future leadership positions, it is imperative to include them in key decision-making roles today," she said in a statement on the occasion of the International Youth Day, marked annually on Aug. 12.
The UAE government, she said, is keen to hear the voices of young people and empower them to achieve their goals. 
The National Strategy for Cultural and Creative Industries is one of the strategies which enables the UAE to invest in young talent and “helps nurture creativity and harness their energy to work towards a sustainable future,” according to state news agency WAM. 
The UAE has also launched initiatives and found specialised organisations that cater to young people's needs. 
This includes establishing the Federal Youth Authority (FYA) which implements 35 youth initiatives through 15 creative youth hubs across the country to engage the young population in various sectors of society.
The minister also said that the UAE also focuses on young people from all over the world. 
“This is the reason why Arab youth have chosen the UAE, for 10 consecutive years, as the best country to live and work. It goes to show that the country's strategy in attracting and caring for creative youth and providing them with a conducive environment is bearing fruit and enhancing the capabilities of the country and youth alike,” she said.


Iran says EU proposal to revive nuclear deal could be ‘acceptable’

Iran says EU proposal to revive nuclear deal could be ‘acceptable’
Updated 8 min 19 sec ago

Iran says EU proposal to revive nuclear deal could be ‘acceptable’

Iran says EU proposal to revive nuclear deal could be ‘acceptable’
  • The EU earlier it had put forward “final” text following indirect talks between the US and Iranian officials in Vienna

DUBAI, Aug 12 : A European Union proposal to revive the 2015 Iran nuclear deal “can be acceptable if it provides assurances” on Tehran’s key demands, the state news agency IRNA said on Friday, quoting a senior Iranian diplomat.
The EU said on Monday it had put forward a “final” text following four days of indirect talks between the US and Iranian officials in Vienna.
A senior EU official said no more changes could be made to the text, which has been under negotiation for 15 months. He said he expected a final decision from the parties within a “very, very few weeks.”
IRNA quoted the unidentified Iranian diplomat as saying Tehran was reviewing the proposal. “Proposals by the EU can be acceptable if they provide Iran with assurance on the issues of safeguards, sanctions and guarantees,” the diplomat said.
The Islamic Republic has sought to obtain guarantees that no future US president would renege on the deal if it were revived, as then-President Donald Trump did in 2018 and restored harsh US sanctions on Iran.
However, President Joe Biden cannot provide such ironclad assurances because the deal is a political understanding rather than a legally binding treaty.
Washington has said it is ready to quickly reach an agreement to revive the deal on the basis of the EU proposals.
Iranian officials said they would convey their “additional views and considerations” to the EU, which coordinates the talks, after consultations in Tehran.
The 2015 pact seemed near revival in March. But 11 months of indirect talks between Tehran and the Biden administration in Vienna were thrown into disarray chiefly over Iran’s insistence that Washington remove its elite Revolutionary Guards Corps from the US Foreign Terrorist Organizations list.
Under the 2015 agreement, Iran curbed its disputed uranium enrichment program, a possible pathway to nuclear weapons, in return for relief from US, EU and UN sanctions. Tehran says it wants nuclear power only for peaceful purposes.


UAE aid ship arrives in Somalia to deliver food and relief supplies

UAE aid ship arrives in Somalia to deliver food and relief supplies
Updated 12 August 2022

UAE aid ship arrives in Somalia to deliver food and relief supplies

UAE aid ship arrives in Somalia to deliver food and relief supplies
  • The number of Somalians facing crisis hunger levels is expected to rise from 5 million to more than 7 million in the coming months

DUBAI: A UAE aid ship has docked in Somalia’s Mogadishu port to deliver 1,000 tons of food and relief supplies for approximately 2.5 million residents affected by drought.

Somalia is currently experiencing a two-year historic dry spell, a situation not seen in more than 40 years, and up to one million people have been displaced as the drought ravaged crops and livestock.

The number of Somalians facing crisis hunger levels is expected to rise from 5 million to more than 7 million in the coming months, the UN refugee agency UNHCR said.

The provision of relief aid comes from UAE President Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan’s earlier order for 35 million dirhams worth of urgent humanitarian aid be sent to families and those displaced in their areas and camps.

The aid reaffirms the UAE’s commitment to helping friendly countries and its efforts to develop its bilateral relations with Somalia, state news agency WAM earlier said.


Syria rebels call for protests over Turkey’s ‘reconciliation’ call

Syria rebels call for protests over Turkey’s ‘reconciliation’ call
Updated 51 min 39 sec ago

Syria rebels call for protests over Turkey’s ‘reconciliation’ call

Syria rebels call for protests over Turkey’s ‘reconciliation’ call
  • Comments sparked calls for protests in key cities that fall under the control of Turkish forces
  • Ankara has launched successive military offensives in Syria

SYRIA: Protests broke out in Syria’s rebel-held north on Friday over a call from Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu for reconciliation between the Syrian government and opposition.
“We have to somehow get the opposition and the regime to reconcile in Syria. Otherwise, there will be no lasting peace, we always say this,” Cavusoglu said Thursday, in remarks to diplomats.
The comments have sparked calls for protests after Friday weekly prayers in key cities that fall under the control of Turkish forces and their supporters, including in Al-Bab, Afrin and Jarablus.
Similar calls were made in Idlib, controlled by Hayat Tahrir Al-Sham and other rebel groups, to gather at border crossings with Turkey.
Small protests already began overnight in some areas, including Al-Bab, where dozens gathered holding opposition slogans and chanting against Turkey.
Some demonstrators burned a Turkish flag, while others took down Turkey’s colors hung up around the city, an AFP photographer said.
Dozens of others gathered at the Bab Al-Salama crossing to Turkey, many shouting “death rather than indignity.”
Turkey’s top diplomat also revealed that he had held a short meeting in Belgrade in October with his Syrian counterpart Faisal Al-Meqdad, adding that communication had resumed between the two countries’ intelligence agencies.
But he denied direct talks between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Syrian counterpart Bashar Assad, despite long-standing calls from Russia for such dialogue.
Cavusoglu added that Turkey would continue its fight against “terrorism” in Syria, following warnings from Ankara since May that it could launch new strikes on Kurdish-held areas in north and northeast Syria.
Ankara has launched successive military offensives in Syria. Most have targeted Kurdish militants that Turkey links to a group waging a decades-long insurgency against it.
Cavusoglu’s comments have sparked widespread anger among the opposition, with renowned figure George Sabra writing on Facebook: “If Cavusoglu is concerned with reconciling with the Syrian regime, that is his business. As for the Syrians, they have a different cause for which they have paid and continue to pay the dearest price.”
About half a million people have died during Syria’s 11-year conflict, which has destroyed large swathes of the country and displaced millions of people.


Iran seeks 3 more Khayyam satellites

Iran seeks 3 more Khayyam satellites
Updated 12 August 2022

Iran seeks 3 more Khayyam satellites

Iran seeks 3 more Khayyam satellites
  • The Khayyam earlier blasted into orbit, prompting US accusations that it is intended for spying
  • Washington said Russia’s growing cooperation with Iran should be viewed as a threat

TEHRAN: Iran plans to commission three more versions of a satellite launched this week by Russia, Tehran’s government spokesman said Friday.
The Khayyam blasted into orbit on Tuesday, prompting US accusations that it is intended for spying. Iran dismissed Washington’s claim as “childish.”
“The construction of three other Khayyam satellites with the participation of Iranian scientists is on the government’s agenda,” its spokesman Ali Bahadori-Jahromi said on Twitter.
A Soyuz-2.1b rocket sent the satellite into orbit from the Moscow-controlled Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Responding to the launch, Washington said Russia’s growing cooperation with Iran should be viewed as a “profound threat,” but the head of Iran’s Space Agency, Hassan Salarieh, dismissed the accusation.
He said the Khayyam is designed to meet Iran’s needs for “crisis and urban management, natural resources, mines, agriculture and so on.”
The Khayyam was built by the Russians under Iran’s supervision, Salarieh said at a press conference on Wednesday.
Ahead of the launch, The Washington Post quoted anonymous Western intelligence officials as saying that Russia “plans to use the satellite for several months or longer” to assist its war effort before allowing Iran to take control.
Iran’s space agency stressed on Sunday that it would control the satellite “from day one,” in an apparent reaction to the Post’s report.
Khayyam, apparently named after the 11th-century Persian polymath Omar Khayyam, will not be the first Iranian satellite that Russia has put into space.
In 2005, Iran’s Sina-1 satellite was deployed from Russia’s Plesetsk Cosmodrome.
The new satellite launch came a day after the European Union submitted a “final text” at talks to salvage a 2015 deal aimed at reining in Iran’s nuclear ambitions, and which Tehran said it was reviewing.
The United States has accused Iran of effectively supporting Russia’s war against Ukraine while adopting a “veil of neutrality.”
Iran insists its space program is for civilian and defense purposes only, and does not breach the 2015 nuclear deal, or any other international agreement.
Western governments worry that satellite launch systems incorporate technologies interchangeable with those used in ballistic missiles capable of delivering a nuclear warhead, something Iran has always denied wanting to build.