Mane saves Senegal, Morocco beat Ghana at African Cup

Morocco’s forward Sofiane Boufal (C) is congratulated by teammates after scoring in the match between Morrocco and Ghana in Yaounde, on January 10, 2022. (AFP)
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Morocco’s forward Sofiane Boufal (C) is congratulated by teammates after scoring in the match between Morrocco and Ghana in Yaounde, on January 10, 2022. (AFP)
Ghana’s captain Andre Ayew, center left, and Morocco’s captain Romain Saiss, center right, jump for the ball. (AP)
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Ghana’s captain Andre Ayew, center left, and Morocco’s captain Romain Saiss, center right, jump for the ball. (AP)
Senegal’s forward Sadio Mane (L) shoots as Zimbabwe’s goalkeeper Petros Mhari (R) prepares to make a save in the match between Senegal and Zimbabwe. (AFP)
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Senegal’s forward Sadio Mane (L) shoots as Zimbabwe’s goalkeeper Petros Mhari (R) prepares to make a save in the match between Senegal and Zimbabwe. (AFP)
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Updated 10 January 2022

Mane saves Senegal, Morocco beat Ghana at African Cup

Morocco’s forward Sofiane Boufal (C) is congratulated by teammates after scoring in the match between Morrocco and Ghana in Yaounde, on January 10, 2022. (AFP)
  • Neither game produced much high-quality football despite them involving three title contenders
  • Guinea beat Malawi 1-0 in the day’s other Group B game

BAFOUSSAM, Cameroon: Sadio Mane saved Senegal with a 97th-minute penalty to beat Zimbabwe 1-0 while Morocco won the first meeting of heavyweights at the African Cup of Nations with a late goal to edge Ghana 1-0 on Monday.
Neither game produced much high-quality football despite them involving three title contenders. It didn’t disappoint that many fans in Cameroon, though, as both were played in front of sparse crowds as the African showpiece reverted to one of its perennial problems.
The tournament often struggles with poor attendances when the host nation isn’t playing. This year, only people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 are allowed into the stadiums, meaning the crowds in Cameroon might be even smaller than normal.
Senegal, Africa’s top-ranked team, opened their campaign on the second day of the tournament with an unconvincing win in Group B over a team ranked 101 places below them. It was a win nonetheless.
Mane sent goalkeeper Petros Mhari the wrong way and drilled his very late penalty into the left corner at the Kouekong Stadium in Cameroon’s western city of Bafoussam. The Liverpool forward took his chance after Zimbabwe midfielder Kelvin Madzongwe was penalized for handball in the fourth minute of injury time as the game suddenly ended in drama.
Zimbabwe protested vehemently but referee Mario Escobar of Guatemala stuck by his decision after referring to a video review, which is being used at every game at the African Cup for the first time. Madzongwe had thrown himself to the ground trying to block a shot and the ball struck his arm.
Mane’s penalty was effectively the last kick of the game as Escobar blew for fulltime as soon as Zimbabwe restarted.
Senegal played without goalkeeper Edouard Mendy and captain Kalidou Koulibaly, who were among a group of players ruled out for the game after testing positive for the coronavirus. There have been virus outbreaks in many of the 24 squads in the buildup and at the tournament and it seems the African Cup will soldier on through them.
In an update to its tournament rules because of the virus, the Confederation of African Football has said teams must fulfil fixtures if they have at least 11 players healthy and available, even if it means they won’t have any substitutes.
Senegal have also lost forward Ismaila Sarr for the tournament with injury, providing them with a less-than-ideal buildup to its latest quest to win the African title for the first time.
Senegal lost to Algeria in the final at the last African Cup in 2019.
Guinea beat Malawi 1-0 in the day’s other Group B game with a first-half goal from Issiaga Sylla. Guinea-Malawi followed the Senegal-Zimbabwe game at the same stadium.
Morocco vs. Ghana at Ahmadou Ahidjo Stadium in Yaounde seemed headed for 0-0 when Sofiane Boufal suddenly pounced on a loose ball that bounced off a Ghana defender to score Morocco’s 83rd-minute winner.
Ghana captain Andre Ayew finished the game with a bandage wrapped round his head and blood seeping through it after a clash of heads with Morocco skipper Romain Saiss. It encapsulated the game as the Ghanaian came off second best.
Comoros, a tiny Indian Ocean island off the east coast of Africa, made its debut at the African Cup against Gabon in Monday’s last game.
Cameroon’s African Cup opened Sunday when the host team beat Burkina Faso 2-1. The Central African nation has been waiting three years for this tournament after it was stripped of the right to host the 2019 African Cup and then saw its second chance in 2021 postponed for a year because of the pandemic.


Eintracht Frankfurt beat Rangers in shootout to win Europa League

Eintracht Frankfurt beat Rangers in shootout to win Europa League
Updated 8 sec ago

Eintracht Frankfurt beat Rangers in shootout to win Europa League

Eintracht Frankfurt beat Rangers in shootout to win Europa League
  • Rafael Borre was the hero of the night, after already canceling out Joe Aribo’s opener for Rangers as Frankfurt won their first European trophy since 1980 and booked their place in next season’s Champions League

SEVILLE, Spain: Eintracht Frankfurt defeated Rangers 5-4 on penalties to win the Europa League on Wednesday after the final in Seville finished 1-1 at the end of extra time.

Aaron Ramsey missed for Rangers in the shootout after coming on as a substitute with only three minutes left of extra time, before Rafael Borre struck the winning shot to complete Frankfurt’s remarkable triumph.

Borre was the hero of the night, after already canceling out Joe Aribo’s opener for Rangers as Frankfurt won their first European trophy since 1980 and booked their place in next season’s Champions League.

“We are all heroes. Without the fans we wouldn’t have made it,” said Frankfurt goalkeeper Kevin Trapp.

Both clubs were looking to win a second European title in their history, Rangers after clinching the Cup Winners’ Cup in 1972 and Frankfurt after they lifted the UEFA Cup 42 years ago.

But Rangers came up just short at the end of an incredible run to the final. Only 10 years ago this week, Rangers fell into administration before being liquidated and relegated to Scotland’s bottom tier.

Frankfurt had already beaten Real Betis, Barcelona and West Ham en route to the final and they were probably deserving winners, shading a compelling contest that always seemed to lack real technical quality.

With a capacity of just under 43,000, Sevilla’s Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan was never going to be big enough to house all the traveling fans, with Rangers bringing over an estimated 100,000 while around 60,000 followed Frankfurt to Spain.

The vast majority enjoyed the day in good spirits but security concerns were not unfounded, with skirmishes breaking out in the city center during the day on Wednesday while five German fans were arrested late on Tuesday night after police said 200 Frankfurt fans launched an attack on Rangers supporters.

It was a scruffy opening 15 minutes as Joe Aribo almost got away after a neat pirouette by Scott Wright before John Lundstram scraped his studs down the dipping head of Sebastian Rode, leaving the Frankfurt captain with a bloody shirt that had to be changed and a head that had to be strapped.

The German team gradually took control, faster to the ball and slicker in their passing, suffocating Rangers, who were reduced to speculative punts forward to try to escape the press.

Frankfurt’s Ansgar Knauff went close, the penalty box opening up for the winger at the end of a winding run forward, only for Allan McGregor to tip wide.

Rangers had their moments and improved before the break as Lundstram’s header had to be pushed over and Ryan Jack drove too high.

Frankfurt seemed rejuvenated for the start of the second half but it was Rangers who took the lead just before the hour, capitalizing on two dreadful Frankfurt errors, each compounding the other.

First, Djibril Sow misjudged a header in midfield, sending it back behind his own defense for the lively Aribo to latch onto, and then as Frankfurt’s Tutu chased, he slipped, gifting an free run to the Rangers striker, who calmly slotted home.

Lindstrom might have equalized almost immediately but his finish was blocked and then Daichi Kamada looped onto the roof of the net when Rangers had failed to clear.

The pressure was mounting and in the 69th minute, it told, as Filip Kostic was given too much space out wide to cross and then in the middle, Connor Goldson and Calvin Bassey both hesitated to clear. Borre nipped between them and prodded in.

There were precious few opportunities in the final minutes but the contest became stretched in extra-time, with Borre almost capitalizing on a Bassey stumble.

Rangers were the better team in the second period and their golden chance came in the 118th minute as the sprinting Ryan Kent arrived at the back post but somehow hit keeper Trapp from five yards.

To penalties, and the Rangers fans roared when the coin toss put the shoot-out at their end. James Tavernier, Steven Davis and Scott Arfield all scored for Rangers as did Frankfurt’s Christopher Lenz, Ajdin Hrustic and Kamada, whose shot squeezed in off the post.

But Ramsey fired too straight, hitting Trapp’s left foot and after Kostic and Kemar Roofe converted, it was up to Borre to finish it. He made no mistake.


Dustin Johnson looking to get back on track at PGA Championship

Dustin Johnson looking to get back on track at PGA Championship
Updated 49 min 44 sec ago

Dustin Johnson looking to get back on track at PGA Championship

Dustin Johnson looking to get back on track at PGA Championship
  • Johnson has gone 27 starts over 15 months since winning the Saudi International

OKLAHOMA, US: Dustin Johnson and Jordan Spieth are examples of how quickly the landscape can change.

Look back one year, and Johnson was the No. 1 player in the world who had been runner-up in the previous two PGA Championships and among the favorites every time he played.

Going into this PGA Championship, which starts Thursday at Southern Hills, he is No. 12. It’s not the end of the world, but it’s his lowest ranking in seven years, and the questions have changed. Instead of when he will add another major, it’s about when he will win again.

Johnson has gone 27 starts over 15 months since winning the Saudi International.

“The thing for me has just been driving,” Johnson said. He thought back to the Masters, where his driver was behaving so badly he switched to a 3-wood. That’s not a bad option for most players, just not Johnson.

“I’ve never done that in my life — 3-wood is the last club in my bag that I’d want to hit,” he said. “I’ve always felt most comfortable with a driver.”

That would be a good club for him at Southern Hills after its acclaimed restoration project. Unlike the last time the PGA was here in 2007 and players were hitting mostly irons off the tee. Now that it’s at 7,556 yards for a par 70, the driver could go a long way.

“Obviously, this is a really good place to drive it straight for me,” Johnson said.

He arrived on Monday, taking those long strides up the hill toward the clubhouse, when Johnson was asked if it was his first time in Oklahoma.

“Yep,” he said. “And after this week, it will be my ... .” He finished the sentence with a smile. At age 38, and with no major on the horizon here for the next eight years, well, he’d like to make the most of his time in the Sooner State.

A year ago, Spieth was No. 28 in the world, a month away from ending a long victory drought but still far away from his game being back to the form that made him a major force in golf at age 21.

Now the 28-year-old from Texas is No. 8 and coming off a particularly good stretch that followed an irritating missed cut at the Masters. Spieth won in Hilton Head the following week and then finished one shot behind in Dallas last week.

The PGA Championship is all that’s keeping him from the career Grand Slam, which is one of the key talking points this week. Spieth brought up the missing leg of the Grand Slam as the “elephant in the room.”

But for the state of golf, it’s starting to feel like a herd of pachyderms.

Where’s Phil Mickelson, the defending PGA champion? And what will he do next when he emerges from this self-imposed exile over his comments on the Saudi-funded golf series that seemingly offended both sides?

Tiger Woods still commands all the attention. The gallery was enormous for him playing nine holes on Monday and again on Wednesday in his final tuneup for his return to Southern Hills. Those around him felt it was a victory that he made it through 72 holes at the Masters in his first competitive tournament since his car crash.

“I’ve gotten stronger since then,” Woods said. “It’s still going to be sore, and walking is a challenge. I can hit golf balls, but the challenge is walking. It’s going to be that way for the foreseeable future, for sure.”

Not to be overlooked is the Saudi-funded series Greg Norman is orchestrating, set to start in three weeks outside London with still no idea who will be playing, with the PGA Tour denying releases required to play outside the country.

Rory McIlroy said earlier in the week, “It’s going to shape the future of professional golf one way or another, so I think we’re just going to have to see how it all shakes out.”

Spieth could only smile when after a series of questions about the career Grand Slam and his game and Southern Hills, he was asked about Mickelson and the Saudi league.

“Since everyone was lobbing me questions, you just went and threw two bombs,” he said with a wry smile. He didn’t looked bothered, and odds are he wasn’t.

“I’m excited to come here this week and just keep my head down, and none of those distractions weigh on me whatsoever,” he said.

And then there’s Johnson, who doesn’t seem to get distracted by much of anything. He was courted heavily by the Saudi group at the start of the year before declaring he wanted to play against the best on the PGA Tour. He also had no small matter of a wedding to Paulina Gretzky just two weeks after the Masters.

Which was the greater distraction?

“Neither,” he said. “Paulina did an unbelievable job with the wedding. I really didn’t have to do much. I helped for about half an hour with the seating chart. That was about it. That was my whole contribution.”

On Thursday, it’s all about major championship golf. And even with the Masters only five weeks removed, it couldn’t get here soon enough.


Saudi gold medals for Al-Issa, Al-Yassin at GCC Games in Kuwait

Saudi gold medals for Al-Issa, Al-Yassin at GCC Games in Kuwait
Updated 18 May 2022

Saudi gold medals for Al-Issa, Al-Yassin at GCC Games in Kuwait

Saudi gold medals for Al-Issa, Al-Yassin at GCC Games in Kuwait
  • Bronze for Muzna Al-Nassar in women’s 5000 meters and Raghad Abuarish in women’s high jump

Saudi swimmer Ali Al-Issa has claimed a gold medal in the 100 meter backstroke competition on the third day of the GCC Games in Kuwait.

Al-Issa’s win was achieved with a time of 59.79 seconds.

There was more gold medal success for the Saudi contingent as Ahmed Al-Yassin won the decathlon competition with 7,270 points, while his Saudi colleague Saeed Mabrouk took silver with 7,017 points.

Elsewhere, there was plenty of success for Saudi athletes, while some experienced names just missed out on medals.

Al-Issa’s swimming team colleague Youssef Buarish — who took part in the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo — could only finish fifth in the final of the 100 meter butterfly race with a time of 56.25 seconds.

In the athletics competition, runner Muzna Al-Nassar repeated her bronze medal performance from Day 2 after finishing third in the 5000 meter race with a time of 20 minutes, 33 seconds.

In the women’s high jump, Raghad Abuarish also claimed bronze after clearing a height of 1.45 meters.

Saudi runner Fahad Al-Subaie won the silver medal in the men’s 200 meter race with a time of 20.92 seconds, while his teammate Mahmoud Hafez finished third — and claimed bronze — with a time of 21.13 seconds.

Yousef Asiri achieved a bronze medal in the men’s 5000 meter race with a time of 14 minutes, 14 seconds.

Also in the athletics competitions, Ahmed Al-Taruti took the bronze in the men’s high jump with a distance of 2.1 meters.

Mohammed Al-Sharida, Fahd Al-Mutairi and Faisal Al-Dajani claimed a set of bronze medals after finishing third in the men’s team shooting competition.


Mourinho says he and Ancelotti still have a lot more to give

Mourinho says he and Ancelotti still have a lot more to give
Updated 18 May 2022

Mourinho says he and Ancelotti still have a lot more to give

Mourinho says he and Ancelotti still have a lot more to give
  • The 59-year-old Mourinho was asked Wednesday if critics had been too quick to write him and 62-year-old Carlo Ancelotti off too quickly
  • “The problem with Carlo was that when you coach Everton you definitely won’t win the Champions League,” Mourinho said

ROME: José Mourinho sees no reason to stop now after reaching another European final while approaching his 60th birthday.
The 59-year-old Mourinho was asked Wednesday if critics had been too quick to write him and 62-year-old Carlo Ancelotti off too quickly.
Mourinho’s Roma will meet Feyenoord in the Europa Conference League final next week. Three days later, Ancelotti’s Real Madrid team will play Liverpool in the Champions League final.
Both coaches had mixed results in their previous jobs in England at Tottenham (Mourinho) and Everton (Ancelotti).
“The problem with Carlo was that when you coach Everton you definitely won’t win the Champions League. My problem is that people looked at it as me taking on jobs to win but it wasn’t about winning,” Mourinho said. “When you have a history of repeated success, people can say those things — it doesn’t bother me.”
Next Wednesday’s match in Tirana, Albania, will mark the fifth European final of Mourinho’s career. He has won all four that he’s coached in so far, over a span of nearly two decades: the 2003 UEFA Cup and 2004 Champions League finals with Porto; the 2010 Champions League final with Inter Milan; and the 2017 Europa League final with Manchester United.
Still, younger coaches like Pep Guardiola and Jürgen Klopp have attracted more attention than Mourinho in recent years.
“I don’t think about it as ‘the new generation,’ or ‘a different generation,’” Mourinho said. “Quality has no age. The same thing applies to players. There are players who are great at 20 and players who are great at 40.
“When you don’t have the passion anymore that’s when you’re done. When you don’t feel a bit of pressure before these games that means you’re done,” Mourinho added. “I know it for myself and I know Carletto (Ancelotti) fairly well. When you’ve got the passion and the quality, it’s up to us to say when we’re done. We’re the ones who will decide when to quit. But I think you’ll have to wait a while. Because it won’t be soon.”


Saudi racing star Reema Juffali launches new Theeba Motorsport team

Saudi racing star Reema Juffali launches new Theeba Motorsport team
Updated 18 May 2022

Saudi racing star Reema Juffali launches new Theeba Motorsport team

Saudi racing star Reema Juffali launches new Theeba Motorsport team
  • Team’s mission will be to improve Saudi participation in auto events, with ultimate aim of taking part in Le Mans 24 Hours

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s first female racing driver Reema Juffali on Wednesday announced that she has launched a new team, Theeba Motorsport, which is set to enter motor racing’s GT3 world stage in 2022.

The team’s mission will be to improve Saudi participation and representation in the motorsport industry.

Juffali, said: “After a very successful debut weekend in the International GT Open with SPS Automotive, I’m very proud to announce the formation of Theeba Motorsport and to unveil our plans for the 2022 season.”

Since becoming the first female Saudi racing driver, Juffali has forged a reputation as a role model and will continue to make waves in the next chapter of her career as she seeks to spark further change in the Kingdom.

In 2019, she made history by becoming the first Saudi Arabian woman to compete in an international race in her home country and, alongside driving, will take her first steps into team management this year.

Theeba Motorsport will provide a platform for Saudis to learn about and take part in motorsport through a variety of engineering, mechanical and commercial internship and apprenticeship programs.

The team hopes to one day compete at the prestigious Le Mans 24 Hours race under a Saudi Arabian license.

“As a team, we have a purpose that extends far beyond the race track, and it is our ambition to improve Saudi Arabian representation and access to motorsport,” Juffali said.

“While we want to create a place in racing for the Kingdom, we also want to create opportunities and will provide a space for Saudi people to get involved in a series of hands-on internship and apprenticeship programs. This will, hopefully, culminate in a majority Saudi team one day racing at the Le Mans 24 Hours.”

Theeba Motorsport will take its first competitive steps in 2022 by contesting the International GT Open Championship — one of Europe’s highest tiers of GT3 racing.

Following a winning debut at Estoril with SPS Automotive, Juffali will compete in all remaining races in the Mercedes-AMG GT3 EVO, and will be partnered by long-time friend, driver coach and GT ace Adam Christodoulou.

“We will take our first steps in the International GT Open in 2022 — a series that I believe will offer a competitive platform to race in while also offering the chance to develop and learn,” said Juffali.

“This is only the first step and a starting point in what will be a long journey to find Saudi Arabia’s place in the motor racing world and I’m extremely excited to see what the future holds.”

After its Estoril season-opener, the International GT Open will visit six other circuits in 2022, staring at Paul Ricard on May 20-22, and moving on to Spa, the Hungaroring, Red Bull Ring, Monza and Barcelona in 12 races from that will run until October.