MENA’s first animal vaccine facility in Saudi aimed at reducing cattle diseases to start in 2024

Exclusive MENA’s first animal vaccine facility in Saudi aimed at reducing cattle diseases to start in 2024
Esteban Turic, CEO of Biogenesis Bago (supplied)
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Updated 22 May 2022

MENA’s first animal vaccine facility in Saudi aimed at reducing cattle diseases to start in 2024

MENA’s first animal vaccine facility in Saudi aimed at reducing cattle diseases to start in 2024

RIYADH: The Middle East North Africa region’s first animal vaccine facility aimed at reducing foot and mouth diseases, located in Saudi Arabia, is expected to be operational by 2024, according to one of the project’s owners.

The new plant, which is a joint venture between Argentina’s Biogenesis Bago and Saudi partners, is currently under construction in the eastern part of the Kingdom with a cost of $80 million.

The facility is capable of producing 200 million doses of vaccines a year at full capacity, covering the entire regional demand, said Esteban Turic, CEO of Biogenesis Bago in an exclusive interview with Arab News.
 
Biogenesis and its Saudi partner MAS are building the facility in Dammam industrial zone and it will eventually supply roughly three times more than the current demand of doses in Saudi Arabia, and 20 times more than in Jordan and Iraq, he added.

This new facility has a crucial significance, as the region is home to over one billion heads of cattle, goats, sheep and camelids. As foot and mouth diseases are very common in these animals, the new facility will significantly reduce the import of vaccines and crucially have vaccines in close proximity to react quickly if necessary.

Talking about selecting Saudi Arabia as the place for developing this facility, Turic said, “Saudi Arabia has one of the biggest domestic markets which demands the biggest volume of this vaccine. Secondly, because it’s in the middle of the GCC countries, and through the 2030 vision, the country provides a lot of incentives for the private sector.”

The vaccine plant which is expected to begin production by the second half of 2024 will start producing 50 million doses in the first year, and will reach the maximum production capacity within two years, added Turic.

Turic also revealed that the facility will create 300 direct jobs in Saudi Arabia, to include biochemists, biologists, and engineers. The indirect jobs will be in excess of 300, he added. 

He also made it clear that most of these direct and indirect jobs will be among Saudi Arabian nationals.


Here’s what you need to know before Tadawul trading on Tuesday

Here’s what you need to know before Tadawul trading on Tuesday
Updated 05 July 2022

Here’s what you need to know before Tadawul trading on Tuesday

Here’s what you need to know before Tadawul trading on Tuesday

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s stock market extended losses on Monday as recession and inflation risks continue to bother investors.

The main benchmark index TASI lost 0.9 percent to close at 11,358, hit by a 1.3-percent fall in oil giant Aramco, while the parallel market Nomu dropped 1.9 percent to 20,672.

Likewise, the stock exchanges of Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Qatar, and Kuwait all shed between 0.2 and 1.4 percent.

Bahrain and Oman bucked the downward trend to close 0.5 and 0.2 percent higher, respectively.

Apart from the Gulf, Egypt’s blue-chip index EGX30 continued its losing streak as it slipped 3.6 percent.

Oil prices were slightly changed on Tuesday due to lingering supply concerns and worries over a potential global recession.

Brent crude futures edged down to $113.28 a barrel and US West Texas Intermediate rose almost 1.5 percent to $110.02 a barrel by 9:16 a.m. Saudi time.

Stock news

Petro Rabigh’s rump offering generated a total of SR390 million ($104 million) in proceeds after selling over 23 million shares

Middle East Specialized Cables Co. appointed Yahiya Al-Qunaibit as board chairman and Saad Al-Shammari as vice-chairman

Two substantial shareholders in Wataniya Insurance Co. have executed an off-market deal where SNIC Insurance Co. sold a 2.5 percent stake to E.A. Juffali and Brothers for SR16.5 million

Jadwa Investment Co. sold a property located in Riyadh, namely Raud Al Jenan School, for SR27 million

National Industrialization Co. elected Mubarak Al-Khafrah as its chairman and Talal Al-Maiman as its vice-chairman

Gulf General Cooperative Insurance Co. has signed a one-year deal with Al-Rashid Trading and Contracting Co. to provide medical insurance services

Calendar

July 7, 2022

Saudi Exchange will close for the Eid Al Adha holidays and resume trading on July 13


Aramco sets for $44bn profit amid mixed Q2 earnings of Saudi firms: Al-Rajhi Capital 

Aramco sets for $44bn profit amid mixed Q2 earnings of Saudi firms: Al-Rajhi Capital 
Updated 05 July 2022

Aramco sets for $44bn profit amid mixed Q2 earnings of Saudi firms: Al-Rajhi Capital 

Aramco sets for $44bn profit amid mixed Q2 earnings of Saudi firms: Al-Rajhi Capital 

RIYADH: Saudi-listed companies are expected to see mixed earnings in the second quarter of 2022, amid rising oil prices, looming economic slowdown risks, and interest rate hikes, according to Al-Rajhi Capital.

The Riyadh-based financial service firm which has analyzed the performance of all industrial sectors expects the Kingdom’s oil giant Aramco to post SR164.8 billion ($44 billion) in profits in the second quarter of 2022, up 81 percent from a year earlier. It estimates the chemical giant Saudi Basic Industries Corp.’s profit to slightly slip by 1 percent to SR7.6 billion.

Apart from SABIC, petrochemical companies will see pressure on earnings, weighed down by higher feedstock costs amid stable polymer prices, the report added.

In the healthcare sector, Al Rajhi Capital forecasts leaps in performance for two major players on improved capacity utilization, as Dallah Health and Sulaiman Al Habib are expected to see a profit surge of 50 percent and 10 percent respectively.

For the cement sector, however, the outlook is negative. All companies including, but not limited to, Saudi Cement, Southern Cement, and Yamama Cement are expected to see a drop in profit due to lower cement volumes.

The investment bank’s forecast for Saudi Telecom Co., known as stc, revealed an 8-percent increase in net profit, reaching SR3.07 billion.


Saudi non-oil sector sees robust improvement in business condition in June: S&P Global 

Saudi non-oil sector sees robust improvement in business condition in June: S&P Global 
Updated 05 July 2022

Saudi non-oil sector sees robust improvement in business condition in June: S&P Global 

Saudi non-oil sector sees robust improvement in business condition in June: S&P Global 

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has seen a robust improvement in business conditions across the non-oil sector in June, as the Kingdom steadily advances in its path of economic transition, according to the latest PMI data from S&P Global.

It said new business rose at the sharpest rate for eight months, despite evidence that intensifying cost pressures had led companies to mark up their prices. 

David Owen, Economist at S&P Global Market Intelligence, said: "Saudi Arabia's non-oil economy continued to go from strength to strength in June, with the PMI picking up to an eight-month high of 57.0 and posting well above the 50.0 no-change mark. 

He said the upturn was underlined by a robust increase in new business levels, which encouraged firms to expand their output sharply and make greater input purchases.


China plans $75bn infrastructure fund to revive economy — sources

China plans $75bn infrastructure fund to revive economy — sources
(Shutterstock)
Updated 05 July 2022

China plans $75bn infrastructure fund to revive economy — sources

China plans $75bn infrastructure fund to revive economy — sources

BEIJING: China will set up a state infrastructure investment fund worth 500 billion yuan ($74.69 billion) to spur infrastructure spending and revive a flagging economy, two people with knowledge of the matter told Reuters on Tuesday.

China’s economy has started a slow recovery from the supply shocks caused by extensive lockdowns since the second quarter, although headwinds to growth persist, including from a still subdued property market, soft consumer spending and fear of any recurring waves of infections.

The fund is expected to be set up in the third quarter, the sources said.

China has unveiled a raft of economic support measures in recent weeks, although analysts say the official gross domestic product target of around 5.5 percent for this year will be hard to achieve without doing away with its strict zero-COVID strategy.

Much of the economic support has come from fiscal stimulus to counter the impact from COVID-19 this year, with the central bank steadily easing liquidity conditions to lower financing costs.

Authorities are doubling down on an infrastructure push, dusting off an old playbook to revive the economy, pledging 800 billion yuan in new credit quota and 300 billion yuan in financial bonds for policy banks to support big projects.

Sources told Reuters that China will issue 2023 advance quota for local government special bonds in the fourth quarter, with the new quota likely bigger than 1.46 trillion yuan for 2022.

The Ministry of Finance and the National Development and Reform Commission did not immediately respond to Reuters’ requests for comment.

The cabinet has told local governments to ensure 3.45 trillion yuan in special bond issuance for infrastructure — part of the 2022 special bond quota of 3.65 trillion yuan — is completed by the end of June.

 


Oil rises as tight supply trumps recession fears

Oil rises as tight supply trumps recession fears
Updated 04 July 2022

Oil rises as tight supply trumps recession fears

Oil rises as tight supply trumps recession fears
  • OPEC misses target to boost output in June: Survey

LONDON: Oil rose on Monday as supply concerns driven by lower OPEC output, unrest in Libya and sanctions against Russia outweighed fears of a demand-sapping global recession.
Eurozone inflation hit yet another record high in June, strengthening the case for rapid European Central Bank rate increases, while US consumer sentiment hit a record low.
Brent crude rose $2.26, or 2 percent, to $113.89 a barrel by 12:47 p.m. ET (1648 GMT) after falling more than $1 in early trade. US West Texas Intermediate crude rose $2.20, or 2 percent, to $110.63, in thin volume during the US Independence Day holiday.
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries missed a target to boost output in June, a Reuters survey found.
In OPEC member Libya, authorities declared force majeure at Es Sidr and Ras Lanuf ports as well as the El Feel oilfield on Thursday, saying oil output was down by 865,000 barrels per day.
Meanwhile, Ecuador’s production has been hit by more than two weeks of unrest that has caused the country to lose nearly 2 million barrels of output, said state-run oil company Petroecuador.
Adding to potential supply woes, a strike this week in Norway could cut supply from Western Europe’s largest oil producer and reduce overall petroleum output by about 8 percent.
“This backdrop of mounting supply outages is colliding with a possible shortage in spare production capacity among Middle Eastern oil producers,” said Stephen Brennock of oil broker PVM, referring to the limited ability of producers to pump more oil.
“And without new oil production hitting markets soon, prices will be forced higher.”

British PM
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday called on the OPEC+ producer group to produce more oil to tackle a cost-of-living crisis.
Brent crude has come close this year to topping the 2008 record high of $147 a barrel after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine added to supply concerns.
Soaring energy prices on the back of bans on Russian oil and reduced gas supply have driven inflation to multi-decade highs in some countries and stoked recession fears.