World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference

World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference
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Marine environment experts gathered in Riyadh for a seminar to discuss ways to protect the future biodiversity of the Red Sea. (Supplied)
World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference
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Marine environment experts gathered in Riyadh for a seminar to discuss ways to protect the future biodiversity of the Red Sea. (Supplied)
World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference
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Marine environment experts gathered in Riyadh for a seminar to discuss ways to protect the future biodiversity of the Red Sea. (Supplied)
World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference
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Marine environment experts gathered in Riyadh for a seminar to discuss ways to protect the future biodiversity of the Red Sea. (Supplied)
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Updated 09 June 2022

World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference

World experts debate future protection of Red Sea ecosystems at Saudi conference
  • Delegates focused on 12 key subject areas concerned with ensuring the long-term viability of Red Sea ecosystems

RIYADH: Marine environment experts from around the world recently gathered in Riyadh for a seminar to discuss ways to protect the future biodiversity of the Red Sea.

Saudi Deputy Minister of Environment, Water, and Agriculture Mansour Al-Mushaiti on Wednesday opened the workshop, organized by the National Center for Wildlife, to coincide with UN World Oceans Day.

Delegates attending the conference, titled “The Role of Scientific Research and Cooperation with Relevant Authorities in Preserving the Environments of the Red Sea,” focused on 12 key subject areas concerned with ensuring the long-term viability of Red Sea ecosystems.

World Oceans Day, held annually on June 8, aims to raise global awareness about the impact of human activity on oceans, and this year’s theme was “Revitalization: Collective Action for the Ocean.”

Addressing the workshop, Al-Mushaiti said humanity relied on having a healthy planet that could only exist with a thriving and sustainable marine environment.

“Oceans and seas are a source of food for millions of people, a source of mineral resources and energy for life on the planet, and a major economic resource on which more than 3 billion people depend for their livelihood,” he added.

The minister noted that studies and data had shown that human activity was depleting the oceans faster than they could be replenished, posing critical challenges that required immediate action.

Chief executive officer of the National Center for Wildlife, Mohammed Qurban, highlighted the importance of scientific research in helping to improve marine environments as a major source of food, water, and oxygen.

He said: “Given the importance of scientific research in advancing all aspects of life and finding solutions to urgent issues, the center organized this workshop in which a number of concerned parties have participated in order to achieve maximum benefit from the (12) working papers.”

Qurban pointed out that the center was involved in ongoing projects to rehabilitate and protect damaged marine environments while promoting the preservation of coastal areas.

He added that it was further developing and implementing plans to address threats to land and marine wildlife, and protect endangered species, with the overall goal of restoring the natural ecological balance of ecosystems.

In a recent tweet, Saudi Ambassador to the US Princess Reema bint Bandar bin Sultan, said: “Happy #UNWorldOceansDay #SaudiArabia strives for harmony between human and natural habitats via sustainable management of the world’s oceans, a critical element of the biosphere. @MEWA_KSA @NEOM @TheRedSeaGlobal.”


Saudi crown prince receives letter from Costa Rican president

Saudi crown prince receives letter from Costa Rican president
Updated 15 August 2022

Saudi crown prince receives letter from Costa Rican president

Saudi crown prince receives letter from Costa Rican president
  • Handwritten letter discussed relations between the two countries and ways to develop them in all fields

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman received a letter from the President of Costa Rica Rodrigo Chaves, Saudi Press Agency reported on Monday.

The handwritten letter discussed the solid and close relations between the two countries and ways to develop them in all fields.

The letter was received by the Saudi Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Waleed bin Abdulkarim Al-Khuraiji during a meeting with the non-resident ambassador of Costa Rica to the Kingdom Francisco Chacon Hernandez.

The two officials spoke about bilateral relations, means to enhance them in various fields, and issues of mutual interest.


Saudi, Bahrain ministers discuss labor regulation

Saudi, Bahrain ministers discuss labor regulation
Updated 15 August 2022

Saudi, Bahrain ministers discuss labor regulation

Saudi, Bahrain ministers discuss labor regulation
  • Al-Rajhi hails Bahraini worker social protections

RIYADH: Bahraini Minister of Labor Jameel bin Mohammad Ali Humaidan met with Saudi Minister of Human Resources and Social Development Ahmed bin Suleiman Al-Rajhi on Monday in Riyadh, Bahrain News Agency reported.

The meeting focused on ways to improve technical cooperation in areas of job localization programs and labor market regulation, as well as plans to integrate job seekers and develop human resources.

They examined plans by the two countries to train and qualify citizens, as well as the application of professional standards.

Al-Rajhi reviewed the most significant developments in the Saudi labor market, as well as major projects and initiatives launched in the framework of training and job creation.

The minister also lauded Bahrain’s position and leadership in labor market regulation, citing the country’s experience in improving social protection for workers through the unemployment insurance system.

 


Summer scout camp for girls launched in Asir

Summer scout camp for girls launched in Asir
Updated 15 August 2022

Summer scout camp for girls launched in Asir

Summer scout camp for girls launched in Asir
  • The five-day camp in Abha aims to build character and offer participants an attractive and safe educational environment
  • Abha, the capital city of Asir province near the Red Sea in southwest Saudi Arabia, is known for its mountains and wildlife

JEDDAH: A summer scout camp for girls was launched in Asir on Sunday.

The five-day camp in Abha aims to build character and offer participants an attractive and safe educational environment in which to practice scouting activities that meet girls’ needs through global awareness programs so they can serve the community.

There are 50 girls from across the Kingdom taking part in the camp.

Abha, the capital city of Asir province near the Red Sea in southwest Saudi Arabia, is known for its mountains and wildlife. Its high altitude and cool weather make it more suitable for outdoor and camping activities than other Saudi regions at this time of year.

The director-general of education in the region, Ahmed Al-Omari, said the camp sought to develop girl scouts to help achieve sustainable development indicators, enhance the values of belonging and national loyalty, and qualify girl scouts to represent the country at local and international forums.

It also aimed to prepare scouting teams to help Hajj and Umrah pilgrims, enhance scouting skills to help serve the country in emergencies and crises, and qualify participants to obtain different ranks and accolades.

The camp has several scouting tracks such as sports, training, education, and the environment. It has 17 programs, including hiking, motor competitions, and summer parties.

Activities include first aid courses, chanting, crowd management, cybersecurity, and planting.


Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal

Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal
Updated 15 August 2022

Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal

Saudi Ministry of Culture launches Suppliers’ Portal
  • Platform lets suppliers register for business, submit documents 

RIYADH: The Saudi Ministry of Culture on Monday launched the Suppliers’ Portal, which facilitates communication with local and international suppliers.

Through the portal, suppliers can register and express interest in working with the ministry and its affiliated bodies.

They can also submit legal documents and qualification requirements, generate invoices and track completion certificates through the portal.

Suppliers may make inquiries and requests about other projects submitted by competitors using the portal.

By creating a comprehensive and specialized database for suppliers, the ministry aims to improve the quality of services and meet the cultural objectives of Saudi Vision 2030.


Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway

Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway
Updated 15 August 2022

Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway

Two-month ban on catching Kingfish in Arabian Gulf underway
  • Six GCC states are committed to the two-month ban to protect breeding mothers with eggs during spawning and small Kingfish

RIYADH: A two-month ban on catching Kingfish in the Arabian Gulf started Monday, following an announcement from Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Environment, Water, and Agriculture.

“The application of the ban on fishing ‘Kanaad’ or Kingfish on the coasts of the Arabian Gulf in the Eastern Region for two months begins August 15,” said a MEWA statement issued in coordination with Gulf Cooperation Council states.

The six GCC states are committed to the two-month ban to protect breeding mothers with eggs during spawning and small Kingfish, and provide more opportunities for breeding and egg-laying.

The GCC Agricultural Cooperation Committee required Gulf states in 2019 to take measures to protect Kingfish, such as increasing the legal length of fish allowed to be caught, increasing the eye opening in nets, and defining the season for the fishing ban.

MEWA official and CEO of the National Fisheries Development Program, Dr. Ali Al-Shaikhi, told Arab News: “The ban is important to maintain the supplies of Kingfish, regulate the fishing process, avoid draining the Kingfish fisheries, and reduce the pressure of the fishing effort to balance supplies and fishing.”

Dr. Ali Al-Shaikhi, director general of the General Directorate of Fisheries at MEWA and CEO of the National Fisheries Development Program. (Supplied)

He said the ban promoted sustainable fishing in environmental, economic, and social terms, boosted the fishing industry, and ensured a good standard of living.

He added that the ban contributed to reducing the depletion of those fish species, maintaining sustainable strategic stocks, and allowing mothers to lay eggs during the ban period.

Al-Shaikhi believed the ministry had succeeded in reducing fishing efforts in fish stores in the Arabian Gulf in recent years, thereby ensuring the protection and sustainability of natural marine resources.

Bans had contributed to the growth and improvement of stocks and supplies, allowing Kingfish to multiply and grow in large quantities and sell at competitive prices in markets, he said.

The bans also educated fishermen about the importance of complying with laws protecting marine resources.

Jaafar al-Safwani, an adviser to the Safwa Fishermen's Cooperative Society. (Supplied)

Al-Shaikhi emphasized that the ban was part of the ministry’s desire to achieve its strategic objectives on the sustainability of natural systems, the strengthening of fisheries supplies and quantities, and the sustainability of production.

Bans regulated Kingfish catching through selective means, ensuring the increase of its vital quantities in the waters of the Arabian Gulf and ensuring market price stability.

“There is no doubt that the Eastern Region/Qatif Fisheries Research Center plays an important role in sensitizing and mentoring fishermen to raise awareness of the importance of the prohibition period for certain economic fish.”

Amer Al-Mutairi, director-general of MEWA’s eastern region branch, said the ban included the use of gillnets.

Jaafar al-Safwani, an adviser to the Safwa Fishermen's Cooperative Society, said the bans helped preserve the marine environment, particularly for shrimp, Kingfish, and other fish species.

Safwani, who was a member of the Committee on Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock at the Chamber of Commerce, Eastern Province, told Arab News: “The bans contribute to the indirect improvement of fishermen's income because the ban at certain times of the year allows breeding and improvements in the environment in which many fish live, thereby providing fishermen with more fish and larger volumes throughout the year. Besides, the price of fish increases.”