What We Are Reading Today: ‘The 48 Laws of Power’

What We Are Reading Today: ‘The 48 Laws of Power’
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Updated 18 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: ‘The 48 Laws of Power’

What We Are Reading Today: ‘The 48 Laws of Power’

Author: Robert Greene

“The 48 Laws of Power” is a nonfiction book written by American author and playwright Robert Greene.

The book holds 3,000 years of knowledge about mastering the art of seduction and deception in order to secure power over others.

“The 48 Laws of Power” proposes various means to that end, inferred from historical figures and strategists of great influence such as Niccolo Machiavelli, Sun Tzu and Henry Kissinger.

One of the most prominent laws is the first, which states that an individual must “never outshine the master.”

This law suggests that if your proposed ideas are better than your superior, make sure to attribute this idea to them instead of yourself. Greene explains that disguising your power is a form of strength rather than weakness.

Law 12 teaches the reader to “use selective honesty and generosity to disarm your victim.”

Greene exemplifies this law by introducing the intention and disguise of the Trojan horse.

Law 13 states that “when asking for help, appeal to people’s self-interest, never to their mercy or gratitude.”

While it seems self-explanatory, this law explains that asking for help is inevitable and realistic. But to get a positive response, make sure to appeal to how, by helping you, another person will serve themselves even more.

Greene’s international bestsellers include “The 33 Strategies of War,” “The 50th Law,” “The Art of Seduction,” “Mastery” and “The Laws of Human Nature.”

After attending the University of California, Berkeley, he earned his bachelor’s degree in classical studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Greene moved to Europe after graduating and in 1998, during his time in Italy, he published “The 48 Laws of Power” which has sold more than 1.2 million copies and been translated into 24 languages.

 


What We Are Reading Today: The Dragon Daughter and Other Lin Lan Fairy Tales

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Updated 26 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: The Dragon Daughter and Other Lin Lan Fairy Tales

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Author: June Zhang

The Dragon Daughter and Other Lin Lan Fairy Tales brings together 42 magical Chinese tales, most appearing for the first time in English.
These stories have been carefully selected from
more than a thousand originally published in the early 20th century under the pseudonyms Lin Lan and Lady Lin Lan—previously unknown in the West, and now acclaimed as the Brothers Grimm of China.
The birth of the tales began in 1924, when one author, Li Xiaofeng, published a set of literary stories under the Lin Lan pen name, an alias that would eventually be shared by an editorial team. Together, this group gathered fairy tales from rural regions across China.


What We Are Reading Today: Cults

What We Are Reading Today: Cults
Updated 25 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Cults

What We Are Reading Today: Cults

Author: Max Cutler

Max Cutler’s Cults looks closely at the lives of some of the most disreputable cult figures and tell the stories of their rise to power and fall from grace, sanity, and decency.
It is a study of humanity, an unflinching look at what happens when the most vulnerable recesses of the mind are manipulated and how the things we hold most sacred can be twisted into the lowest form of malevolence.
Cults prey on the very attributes that make us human: Our desire to belong; to find a deeper meaning in life; to live everyday with divine purpose.
Perhaps it’s this mindset that keeps us so utterly obsessed to learn more of the mechanics that make these infamous groups tick.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Dreams of a Lifetime

What We Are Reading Today: Dreams of a Lifetime
Updated 24 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Dreams of a Lifetime

What We Are Reading Today: Dreams of a Lifetime

Authors: Karen A. Cerulo and Janet M. Ruane

Most of us understand that a person’s place in society can close doors to opportunity, but anything is possible when we dream about what might be, or so we think.

Dreams of a Lifetime reveals that what and how we dream — and whether we believe our dreams can actually come true — are tied to our social class, gender, race, age, and life events.

Karen Cerulo and Janet Ruane argue that our social location shapes the seemingly private and unique life of our minds.

We are all free to dream about possibilities, but not all dreamers are equal. Cerulo and Ruane show how our social position ingrains itself on our mind’s eye, quietly influencing the nature of our dreams, whether we embrace dreaming or dream at all, and whether we believe that our dreams, from the attainable to the improbable, can become realities.


What We Are Reading Today: The Sky Is for Everyone

What We Are Reading Today: The Sky Is for Everyone
Updated 22 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: The Sky Is for Everyone

What We Are Reading Today: The Sky Is for Everyone

Authors: Virginia Trimble and David A. Weintraub

The Sky Is for Everyone is an internationally diverse collection of autobiographical essays by women who broke down barriers and changed the face of modern astronomy.

Virginia Trimble and David Weintraub vividly describe how, before 1900, a woman who wanted to study the stars had to have a father, brother, or husband to provide entry, and how the considerable intellectual skills of women astronomers were still not enough to enable them to pry open doors of opportunity for much of the 20th century.

After decades of difficult struggles, women are closer to equality in astronomy than ever before.


What We Are Reading Today: The Double by James Meyer

What We Are Reading Today: The Double by James Meyer
Updated 21 June 2022

What We Are Reading Today: The Double by James Meyer

What We Are Reading Today: The Double by James Meyer

From ancient mythology to contemporary cinema, the motif of the double — which repeats, duplicates, mirrors, inverts, splits, and reenacts — has captured our imaginations, both attracting and repelling us.

The Double examines this essential concept through the lens of art, from modernism to contemporary practice — from the paired paintings of Henri Matisse and Arshile Gorky, to the double line works of Piet Mondrian and Marlow Moss, to Eva Hesse’s One More Than One, Lorna Simpson’s Two Necklines, Roni Horn’s Pair Objects, and Rashid Johnson’s The New Negro Escapist Social and Athletic Club (Emmett).

Richly illustrated throughout, The Double is a multifaceted exploration of an enduring theme in art, from painting and sculpture to photography, film, video, and performance.