Fifth endangered Bengal tiger born in Cuban zoo

Fifth endangered Bengal tiger born in Cuban zoo
A Royal Bengal tiger roams in its enclosure at the central zoo in Lalitpur, on the outskirts of Katmandu, on Friday. (AFP)
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Updated 29 July 2022

Fifth endangered Bengal tiger born in Cuban zoo

Fifth endangered Bengal tiger born in Cuban zoo
  • The birth of all the cubs comes after trying for 20 years to breed the endangered felines
  • Sadly, the new cub is the sole survivor of a litter of four born two weeks ago, as his siblings suffered from severe neurological problems and perished

HAVANA: Another rare Bengal tiger cub was born at Cuba’s National Zoo in Havana, zookeepers said on Friday, just over a year after four of the striped and adorable baby beasts — among them a rare white tiger — graced the grounds.
The birth of all the cubs comes after trying for 20 years to breed the endangered felines.
All the cubs were born to Fiona and her mate, Garfield.
Sadly, the new cub is the sole survivor of a litter of four born two weeks ago, as his siblings suffered from severe neurological problems and perished.
Born underweight, the newcomer, who has yet to be named, is being cared for in the artificial breeding department of the zoo where he is reported to be “frisky.”
“The birth of the cub was a joy. It was so small and we have been feeding it milk and caring for it in other ways,” 21-year-old Maria Karla Gutierrez, one of its care givers, said as she cuddled the small cat.
Thousands of the Bengal tigers, known for their orange coats, once roamed the forests in Bangladesh, India and Nepal. But their numbers have plummeted to about 2,500, wildlife experts say. Poaching, deforestation and over-hunting have all taken their toll.
Three of the world’s nine tiger sub-species became extinct last century, and many scientists believe a fourth, the South China tiger, is already functionally extinct.
The National Zoo, a wildlife park, is a favorite attraction for Cubans, with 1,473 specimens of more than 120 species, including large animals such as elephants and rhinos.
“For the park, for the country and for the world it is a very beautiful thing since tigers are in danger of extinction,” zoological veterinarian Angel Cordero said.
“It makes us proud. We are very happy and we are going to continue reproducing the animals,” he said.


Google marks 51st UAE National Day with Doodle

Google marks 51st UAE National Day with Doodle
Updated 02 December 2022

Google marks 51st UAE National Day with Doodle

Google marks 51st UAE National Day with Doodle
  • UAE National Day is celebrated on December 2 each year

DUBAI: Red, green and black fireworks and an animated four-colored flag are featured in Google’s latest Doodle to celebrate the UAE’s 51st founding anniversary.

“Today’s Doodle celebrates United Arab Emirates National Day. On this day in 1971, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Ajman, Al-Ain, Sharjah and Umm Al-Quwain united to form one country. Ras Al Khaimah, the seventh emirate, joined the following year to complete what is now known as the United Arab Emirates,” Google said.

UAE National Day is celebrated on December 2 each year.

“Celebrations kick off with an exhilarating show at Zayed Sports City Stadium in Abu Dhabi. Thousands of people gather to watch orchestras, musicians, and aerobatic displays. After national leaders give speeches to honor the country’s founding fathers, fireworks splash across the Abu Dhabi skyline as festivities carry into the night,” Google explained.

The UAE’s national flag was officially adopted in 1971, featuring the Pan-Arab colors – a vertical red line with horizontal green, white and black stripes. It was designed by then 19-year-old Abdullah Mohammed Al-Maainah, who beat more than 1,030 entries submitted as part of a nationwide contest for the UAE flag design.


German pundit mocks Qatari traditional dress, calling the thobe a ‘bathrobe’

German pundit mocks Qatari traditional dress, calling the thobe a ‘bathrobe’
Updated 30 November 2022

German pundit mocks Qatari traditional dress, calling the thobe a ‘bathrobe’

German pundit mocks Qatari traditional dress, calling the thobe a ‘bathrobe’
  • Wagner was referring to the thobe, a garment worn in many parts of the world, including the Arabian Peninsula, the Middle East and North Africa

LONDON: German pundit Sandro Wagner mocked the Qatari national dress, calling the thobes “bathrobes” on Sunday while commentating on the World Cup match between Spain and Germany, a remark Twitter users found to be “racist.”

Wagner apologized on Monday, describing his disparaging remark as “ill-considered” in a tweet shared by ZDF on Monday, which came after the German TV channel faced backlash from social media users.

“It was an ill-considered saying with an inappropriate remark that I would be better off not saying. If anyone felt offended — sorry, that was zero point, zero my intention,” the former Germany striker said in the tweet.

Wagner, 35, said in the 79th minute of the Monday evening game: “I thought before that the whole corner (of the stadium) was full of German fans. Then I realized it was the Qatari bathrobes.”

In his comment, Wagner was referring to the thobe, a garment worn in many parts of the world, including the Arabian Peninsula, the Middle East and North Africa.

ZDF commented on Wagner’s demeanor, saying his remark “occurred during an emotional phase of the game” and confirming that it was unacceptable: “He’s not permitted (to say that). We’ll talk about it.”

The German broadcasting company said Wagner will face no further consequences, confirming he will be commentating Wednesday’s match between Poland and Argentina.

People expressed frustration over Wagner’s “racist” remark. One Twitter user said, “This World Cup has put European racism under a spotlight where it can’t hide,” while another commented that “the only reason Sandro Wagner still has a job is because ZDF is just as racist as Wagner.”


Bad abbot: Thai temple left empty after monks fail drug tests

Bad abbot: Thai temple left empty after monks fail drug tests
Updated 30 November 2022

Bad abbot: Thai temple left empty after monks fail drug tests

Bad abbot: Thai temple left empty after monks fail drug tests
  • Thailand is a major transit country for methamphetamine flooding in from Myanmar’s troubled Shan state via Laos, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime

BANGKOK: A Buddhist temple in central Thailand has been left without monks after all its holy men failed drug tests and were defrocked, a local official said Tuesday.
Four monks including an abbot at a temple in Phetchabun province’s Bung Sam Phan district tested positive for methamphetamine on Monday, district official Boonlert Thintapthai told AFP.
The monks have been sent to a health clinic to undergo drug rehabilitation, the official said.
“The temple is now empty of monks and nearby villagers are concerned they cannot do any merit-making,” he said.
Merit-making involves worshippers donating food to monks as a good deed.
Boonlert said more monks will be sent to the temple to allow villagers to practice their religious obligations.
Thailand is a major transit country for methamphetamine flooding in from Myanmar’s troubled Shan state via Laos, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.
On the street, pills sell for less than 20 baht (around $0.50).
Authorities across Southeast Asia have made record meth seizures in recent years.
 

 


Kim Kardashian and Ye settle divorce, averting custody trial

Kanye West, left, and Kim Kardashian attend the WSJ. Magazine Innovator Awards on Nov. 6, 2019, in New York. (AP)
Kanye West, left, and Kim Kardashian attend the WSJ. Magazine Innovator Awards on Nov. 6, 2019, in New York. (AP)
Updated 30 November 2022

Kim Kardashian and Ye settle divorce, averting custody trial

Kanye West, left, and Kim Kardashian attend the WSJ. Magazine Innovator Awards on Nov. 6, 2019, in New York. (AP)
  • Kardashian and Ye will equally split the expenses for the kids’ private security and private school, including college, according to the settlement proposal

LOS ANGELES: Kim Kardashian and Ye have reached a settlement in their divorce, averting a trial that had been set for next month, court documents filed Tuesday showed.
The former couple and their attorneys filed documents asking for a judge’s approval of terms they have agreed on, including $200,000 per month child support payments rom Ye, formerly known as Kanye West, to Kardashian.
The two will have joint custody, and neither will pay the other spousal support, according to the documents filed in Los Angeles Superior Court.
The judge declared the two legally single at Kardashian’s request in March, ending their eight-year marriage, but issues of property and custody remained that were to be worked out in a trial starting Dec. 14.
The two have four children whose ages range from 3 to 9 years old.
Kardashian and Ye will equally split the expenses for the kids’ private security and private school, including college, according to the settlement proposal.
They will also each pay their own debts the settlement said. The two had a pre-nuptial agreement and kept their property largely separate.
The couple began dating in 2012 and had their first child in 2013. West proposed later that year using the giant screen at the empty waterfront ballpark of the San Francisco Giants, and the two married May 24, 2014, in a ceremony at a Renaissance fortress in Florence, Italy.
The two appeared to be headed for a cordial split with agreed-upon terms when Kardashian first filed for divorce in February of 2021. Neither discussed the split publicly until early this year, when Ye started lashing out on social media against Kardashian, her family, and then-boyfriend Pete Davidson. Among his complaints were that he was not being allowed to make major parenting decisions and was been excluded from birthday parties and other events for their children.
Ye, who has fired two lawyers since the divorce filing, also raised several technical issues and demands, including seeking the right to question any new husband of Kardashian’s under oath, which Judge Steve Cochran promptly rejected.
The settlement comes soon after several companies have cut ties with Ye ove r offensive and antisemitic remarks that have further eroded an already withering public image.
His latest lawyer, Nicholas Salick, did not immediately reply to a request for comment on the settlement.
It was the third marriage for Kardashian, the reality TV superstar, businesswoman and influencer, and the first marriage for the rap and fashion mogul Ye. Theirs was one of the most closely followed celebrity unions in recent decades.

 


‘Tinder Swindler’ victim continues to look for love on dating show

‘Tinder Swindler’ victim continues to look for love on dating show
Updated 28 November 2022

‘Tinder Swindler’ victim continues to look for love on dating show

‘Tinder Swindler’ victim continues to look for love on dating show
  • Hayut told Newsbeat that he denies the accusations shown in the Netflix documentary

LONDON: If you watched “The Tindler Swindler,” Netflix’s hit documentary about fraudster Simon Leviev, whose real name is Shimon Hayut, then you will definitely recognize Cecilie Fjellhoy.  

Fjellhoy was one of the women whom Hayut duped out of thousands of pounds by posing as a wealthy heir.  

Five years on, Fjellhoy, 33, is ready to find love again and is appearing on “Celebs Go Dating,” a show where a cast of stars — often from reality shows like “Love Island” and “The Only Way is Essex” — go on dates with non-celebrities. 

Speaking at the series launch, Fjellhoy said to BBC’S Newsbeat: “I don’t feel like a celeb. I don’t want people to think that I look at myself like a celeb, but I really appreciate that my face is actually known around the world. I am blessed that I’m able to do ‘Celebs Go Dating’ and show a different side to me.”

Fjellhoy seems optimistic about dating after her debacle. She explains she finds dating “fun” and will “continue to have with it.”  

She is even back on Tinder. “I never looked at Tinder as the one to be blamed for what happened to me because I met him in real life,” she said, “but I think I went a bit too quick back on the apps.” 

Following the release of “The Tinder Swindler,” Fjellhoy received an outpouring of sympathetic reactions from viewers. However, she was also at the receiving hand of misogynistic comments from people who labeled her as a “gold digger” and deserving of the unfortunate events that befell her.  

Fjellhoy said she is expecting a backlash to her dating show appearance, saying, “Trolling always happens. I’ve learnt not to read (the comments).”

She believes, however, that is important to shine a light on such comments, explaining that they can be “dangerous.”

“It’s fun to laugh about it, but it can be dangerous in the long run,” she said.  

Fjellhoy has been campaigning for more awareness on romance fraud and is calling for training for police and healthcare professionals so that victims can feel better supported. She also wants to help remove some of the stigma surrounding scams so people can feel less ashamed about seeking help if they do fall prey to fraudsters.  

Speaking on Hayut’s release, Fjellhoy said it is “disheartening” and that her goal was to “keep people protected from people like him.” 

In 2019, Hayut was convicted of four charges of fraud, not relating to Fjellhoy’s allegations, and was sentenced to a total of 15 months in prison. He was released after serving only five. Previously in Denmark, in 2015, he was sentenced for defrauding three women. 

Hayut told Newsbeat that he denies the accusations shown in the Netflix documentary. 

Fjellhoy said she unexpectedly ran into Hayut at a beach club in Tel Aviv, Israel, where he currently resides.   

She said she waved at him and continued on. “I am not scared of him. He cannot hurt me anymore,” she said. 

Hayut claims he reported her Tel Aviv visit to the Israeli police and accused her of harassment.  

Fjellhoy says she still receives messages from people, young and old, sharing their own stories of romance fraud. Her advice to them is to speak out if they believe they are being scammed, to reach out to family and friends and to recount their experiences. She also advises them to contact the banks as “they’re not your enemy.” 

She said: “The thing with fraud (is that) you don’t realize red flags when they’re happening. That’s why it’s dangerous. When you realize you’ve been defrauded, go to the police, go to the bank.”