Experience coffee’s journey from bean to taste at Ithra

Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
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Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
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Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
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Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
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Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
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Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day. (AN Photo/Jasmine Bager)
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Updated 23 September 2022

Experience coffee’s journey from bean to taste at Ithra

Experience coffee’s journey from bean to taste at Ithra
  • Saudi Arabia is one of the world’s largest consumers of the drink
  • Kingdom is achieving self-sufficiency in its production, in accordance with the plans of Vision 2030

DHAHRAN: Coffee is hitting the spotlight at Ithra’s Cultural Oasis to celebrate Saudi Arabia’s National Day.

The Saudi Coffee Experience, which is in the outdoor space at the event and is free to enter, promises a tasty sensory journey.

Visitors first see a small stage with a potted plant to illustrate how the coffee bean appears when it is gently twisted off. The stage is painted purple, a color Saudi Arabia has adopted to signify those found in nature.

The next stage contains different coffee pitchers, or dallahs, the oldest of which is from Al-Ahsa in the Eastern Province, and the final stage features the roasting and tasting.

There are five small tables in the back, each dedicated to the regions where the coffees come from.

The north, south, east, west and central regions have distinctive tastes, and tiny cups are available for people to sample the drinks.

Mashari Khaled Al-Rasheed, one of the coffee experts on hand, told Arab News: “We have the journey of Saudi coffee here, in these different stations, from the bean until the taste.

“Aramco has provided a great irrigation initiative and training for 500 farmers in the southern region of the Kingdom, where the beans are grown.

“The bean itself could come from another country but it’s considered Saudi coffee by the way it’s roasted. It makes a difference if you say it’s Saudi-grown coffee or Saudi coffee.

“It’s actually a very complex process that includes very specific timing under a very certain temperature.

“Saudi coffee is known for being lighter. Even the darker roast is considered light in the coffee world.”

Saudi Arabia is one of the world’s largest consumers of the drink, and achieving self-sufficiency in its production, in accordance with the plans of Vision 2030 to diversify the country’s economy, is considered vital.

The Ministry of Culture last December designated 2022 “The Year of Saudi Coffee,” and visitors can taste the product at the Cultural Oasis from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. until Sept. 24.


Saudi crown prince meets Turkish officials in Jeddah

Saudi crown prince meets Turkish officials in Jeddah
Updated 14 sec ago

Saudi crown prince meets Turkish officials in Jeddah

Saudi crown prince meets Turkish officials in Jeddah

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on Saturday received the Turkish presidential spokesman, Dr. Ibrahim Kalin, and Turkish Minister of Treasury and Finance Nureddin Nebati at Al-Salam Palace in Jeddah.
Kalin conveyed greetings from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to King Salman and the crown prince.
During the meeting, they reviewed aspects of bilateral relations between the two countries and ways of developing them in various fields, in addition to discussing cooperation on a number of issues of common interest.


Saudi foreign minister says Kingdom is optimistic despite challenges

Saudi foreign minister says Kingdom is optimistic despite challenges
Updated 42 min 26 sec ago

Saudi foreign minister says Kingdom is optimistic despite challenges

Saudi foreign minister says Kingdom is optimistic despite challenges
  • Real optimism in the Kingdom says Saudi FM

NEW YORK CITY: There is a real optimism in Saudi Arabia despite the obvious challenges faced around the globe, foreign minister Faisal bin Farhan told delegates at the FII Priority Forum in New York on Thursday.

He was responding on Thursday to the “Future Investment Initiative Priority” report, which surveyed 130,000 people from 13 countries about the things that mattered most to them.

The FII Priority report asked if people thought their lives were headed in the right direction - most people globally said they were.

But when the question became wider, people in nations such as the UK, USA and France, became more skeptical about the state of their countries and the world generally – while Saudi’s remained positive.

“There is a real optimism in the kingdom despite the challenges that we face,” the minister said.

 

 

The report found that Saudi’s led the way in feeling positive about their country, only being beaten in their optimism for the state of the world – coming third to China and India.

The upbeat attitude of Saudis didn’t stop there. Asked if they believed their country would be better in the future – a confident 61 percent in the Kingdom said they did – second only to 80 percent in China.

“We are in a difficult neighborhood. We are needing to improve many things in our economy in our country, but we are working very hard at it and that hard work is paying off we are seeing results every day being delivered.”

The report also found that Saudis were very ambitious, looking at work as a means to improve themselves, rather than simply pay the bills.

And while more than half of Americans were looking to quit their jobs – dissatisfied with their current situation, the vast majority of Saudis were planning for their future career and looking to help build their nation.

“If we all did the same if we all put our minds to it and worked hard, we can build a better future,” the minister explained.

He said that youth engagement in the Kingdom was at an “all time high.”

“You go to anywhere,” he added. “You know, private sector or public sector. The youth are really who are leading. It’s the same in my ministry.”

“The youth are the ones the younger generation are the ones that are pushing us.”

And in a nod to the approximate 300 percent increase in women the workforce, he said: “So, there is an optimism, even in a challenging environment without the best resources, you can still build.”

“If you set your mind to it. If you have a leadership that is committed to it, then you have a collective will to do it. So you just need the will.”

The FII Institute is a product of the Future Investment Initiative that was set up in Saudi Arabia by the Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman.


Saudi optimism outweighs the rest of the West at FII in NYC

Saudi optimism outweighs the rest of the West at FII in NYC
Updated 24 September 2022

Saudi optimism outweighs the rest of the West at FII in NYC

Saudi optimism outweighs the rest of the West at FII in NYC
  • Khalid al-Falih, Saudi minister of investment, said people were continuing to invest in the Kingdom
  • The FII Priority report revealed that Saudis felt more motivated about their lives

NEW YORK CITY: Saudi Arabia leads the world in optimism, a new report has found, with the Saudi’s not only confident in where their own lives are headed, but also the Kingdom and even the world.

And the FII Priority event in New York heard from Khalid al-Falih, Saudi minister of investment, who said the optimism was reflected by the conitnued investment in the Kingdom

Released at a forum event in New York on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly on Thursday, the “Future Investment Initiative Priority” report surveyed 130,000 people from 13 countries about the things that mattered most to them.

Richard Attias, CEO of the FII Institute told Arab News he wasn’t surprised that the Middle East and East of the world came over more pessimistic than the West.

“You (the Middle East) have leaders who have a vision. I don't know if it's a longer term vision, but they have a vision. And they expressed that vision in Europe.”

He said West did not have such an obvious vision. “I think the vision is not clearly expressed, and people are a little bit lost. And this is why you saw movements like the yellow jacket in France. A lot of demonstration in Spain, a lot of demonstrations in America.”

“I think these countries, especially the United States, still has to solve many social crisis.”

The FII Priority report asked if people thought their lives were headed in the right direction - most people globally said they were.

But when the question became wider, people in nations such as the UK, USA and France, became more skeptical about the state of their countries and the world generally.

“I'm not surprised to see that the West is pessimistic. The world is pessimistic because we are definitely facing economic crisis,” Attias added.

And he said: “Many people who benefited the most from the globalization are the people in the east. A lot of jobs were created in the east, a lot of jobs was created in the Middle East.”

And Attias said the West was undergoing an “identity crisis,” which did not exist in the East.

The report found that Saudi’s led the way in feeling positive about their country, only being beaten in their optimism for the state of the world – coming third to China and India.

The upbeat attitude of Saudis didn’t stop there. Asked if they believed their country would be better in the future – a confident 61 percent in the Kingdom said they did – second only to 80 percent in China.

In France 83 percent said no, followed by 78 percent in Italy and 75 percent in Germany.

The biggest concerns of people surveyed around the world were all related to the cost of living crisis, with food security and unemployment playing on most people’s minds.

Terrorism was at the bottom of most people’s list of concerns, looking closer to home.

The survey covered three themes: the social crisis, environmental crisis, and what they referred to as the identity crisis (difficulties linked to the integration of migrants and a loss of traditional values).

Largely the report revealed an even balance for concerns surrounding people’s personal lives and the increasing social inequalities – as did environmental concerns.

Despite the politicization of migration in many countries during election campaigns such as Brexit and the US and French presidential elections, the survey revealed that for most people it was not a significant issue at all.

The US returned a 17 percent concern over migration, while 12 percent of Saudis put it high on their list, Morocco was the lowest with just 5 percent of recipients saying migrants concerned them most.

Attias said he believed this focus politicians placed on immigration showed a discord with the public they were supposed to represent.

“This is why there is a disconnection between what leaders think, or what leaders are putting in priorities and what the people want and consider other priorities,” He explained.

He said the disconnection exposed the need for leaders - political and in business – to reconnect with the people.

The survey report found that 70 percent of people in high income countries said they did not believe life was going to get better in their countries – while 70 percent of people in the east and Middle East were optimistic.

There is a social identity crisis, Attias said, not least with a new phenomenon that had been exposed by the report that showed that 50 percent of those surveyed wanted to quit their jobs in the next 12 months.

“We call it the great resignation. I think it will be massive.”

He said the pandemic had caused people to reassess their lives, especially at work where they felt there was no longer scope for progression or to earn more money.

Work, he said, for Westerners at least, had become precisely that – work.

He said 54 percent of people in the west were unable to save for the future, while 66 percent were working to have a decent life.

But in Saudi Arabia 35 percent of those asked looked at work as a way to fulfill themselves.

“We need to listen to people either right or wrong. It is not for me to judge but we need to listen to people.”

He said people were increasingly beginning to feel they are not being heard by the politicians and CEOs.

“I think we have to discuss a call to action  - this a wake up call. Many of the people we spoke to were talking of social revolution,” He said.

The findings of the report seem to push the power east, with Middle East citizens expressing more faith in their countries than the west.

The concept that somehow non-western countries were playing second fiddle is certainly not the perception of those living there.

Yasir Al-Rumayyan, Chairman of the FII Institute and Governor of the Public Investment Fund Saudi Arabia said: “Some of the answers to the questions were surprising. But the most of the responses were what we expected.

Rumayyan said since efforts were made by the West to demonize fossil fuels there had actually been an increase in production, but also cost of living had risen – food is more expensive, he said.

Adding: “Everything has gone in the wrong direction.”

Meanwhile he said the IMF had played a major role in stimulating the Saudi economy as the Kingdom continued to invest both internally and internationally.

There is a definite vibrancy in the Gulf – for those living there it is easy not to notice the food poverty or the cost of living crisis.

Sure prices have increased, but with wages for many in the region being significantly higher than in the west, life is just generally that bit easier.

And the continued activity in the economy – largely for the best – results mostly from the Vision projects in the Gulf region that are fueling the growth – and therefore positivity.

S[peaking at the close of the summit, Khalid al-Falih, Saudi minister of investment, said people were continuing to invest in the Kingdom, despite the crisis.

He said the Kingdom was “emerging as a place where climate challenges are being addressed at scale, and at the right pace with very pragmatic policies and systems in place.”

He added that they were transforming the Saudi economy, bringing new sectors on that have “huge potential for growth,” that attracted a lot of international and domestic capital.

And he said the push brought together partnerships “that are really shaping, not just the future of Saudi Arabia, but I believe the region.”

He said while the pandemic had brought about a. more nationalistic view from many countries around the world, Saudi Arabia was in fact doing the reverse and looking towards external investments that would not just benefit the Kingdom, but also the world.

“We are aligning all of these together and the Kingdom has all of the enablers put together.”

And the minister added: “The Kingdom has some of the best macro economic indicators a very stable economy, very strong fiscal and monetary position, low cost locations, especially with recent trends globally and nation. energy availability, great talent.”

And he played to the younger section of the Saudi community who joining the economy.

He said young men and women were “joining our workforce and joining in as entrepreneurs, and indeed our best weapon, best attraction to bring pastors to the Kingdom.”

And he finished saying: “My message to investors everywhere, is you don’t know what you’re missing until you come to Saudi Arabia.”

And he said investors would find it was the “best location to address quality, high growth investment rich market which is very complex.”

He said the Kingdom’s future investments had become far more diverse than oil and gas – with markets for healthcare, biotech, education, logistics.

And in a nod to confidence Saudis have shown in their country’s future, he added: “We’re really digging deep, we’re not only focusing on large anchor investors, which are very important, but we’re digging deep into the ecosystem of the nation, harvesting and harnessing our most important resource which is our young, talented, unlimited, unlimited people.”


Saudi foreign minister discusses cooperation, security with UN’s Guterres in New York

Saudi foreign minister discusses cooperation, security with UN’s Guterres in New York
Updated 24 September 2022

Saudi foreign minister discusses cooperation, security with UN’s Guterres in New York

Saudi foreign minister discusses cooperation, security with UN’s Guterres in New York
  • Guterres expressed his gratitude for the Kingdom’s continuous efforts to reach a political solution to the Yemeni crisis

NEW YORK: Saudi Arabia’s Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan on Saturday met with UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, on the sidelines of the 77th session of the UN General Assembly in New York.
During the meeting, they reviewed aspects of cooperation between the Kingdom and the UN, in addition to discussing the latest international developments and efforts to enhance international peace and security.
Guterres expressed his gratitude for the Kingdom’s efforts to achieve a truce between the parties to the crisis in Yemen, and the Kingdom’s continuous efforts to reach a political solution to the Yemeni crisis.
The meeting was attended by the Kingdom’s permanent representative to the UN, Dr. Abdulaziz Al-Wasel, and the Director-General of the Office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Abdul Rahman Al-Daoud.


Saudi crown prince and Germany’s Scholz discuss relations, areas of cooperation

Saudi crown prince and Germany’s Scholz discuss relations, areas of cooperation
Updated 58 min 14 sec ago

Saudi crown prince and Germany’s Scholz discuss relations, areas of cooperation

Saudi crown prince and Germany’s Scholz discuss relations, areas of cooperation
  • The two sides reviewed efforts to achieve international stability and peace
  • Prince Mohammed and Olaf Scholz met with business delegations from Saudi Arabia and Germany

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on Saturday received German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in Jeddah, who was in the Kingdom at the beginning of a two-day tour of the Gulf region, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
During the meeting, held at Al-Salam Palace, Prince Mohammed welcomed the German chancellor to the Kingdom and conveyed greetings from King Salman, while Scholz expressed his happiness to visit the country and meet with the crown prince.
The two sides reviewed aspects of Saudi-German relations and areas of partnership between the two countries, in addition to discussing prospects for bilateral cooperation and opportunities for its development in accordance with the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.
During the reception, the latest regional and international developments were discussed, as well as efforts to achieve international stability and peace. They also exchanged views on a number of issues and issues of common concern.
The crown prince and the German chancellor also met with business delegations from Saudi Arabia and Germany.
Prince Mohammed then hosted a working lunch for the German chancellor.
Scholz, who will return to Berlin on Sunday evening after also visiting the UAE and Qatar, is accompanied by a large delegation that includes representatives of several economic sectors.