‘Masterpieces of Saudi Music’ concert delights in Paris

The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir. (Hakima Bedouani)
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Updated 08 October 2022

‘Masterpieces of Saudi Music’ concert delights in Paris

‘Masterpieces of Saudi Music’ concert delights in Paris
  • The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together more than 100 musicians

PARIS: A concert fusing Saudi and Western music was performed on Friday in Paris by Saudi and French orchestras.

The “Masterpieces of Saudi Music” at the Theatre du Chatelet brought together 50 musicians from the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris and 25 musicians and 40 singers from the Saudi National Orchestra and Choir.

Both orchestras, led by conductor Emad Zari and under the direction of Amine Kouider, presented a joint musical show, performing a medley of Saudi folk songs in different traditional styles, such as Al-Majrour, Al-Mizmar, Al-Khabiti and Al-Samari, followed by a world premiere of the score “Jeddah,” composed by Italian Antonio Bernardi.

The Parisian audience was also treated to interpretations of arias from classic operas, including “O mio bambino caro” by Giacomo Puccini, “O sole mio” by Eduardo di Capua and Emanuele Alfredo Mazzucchi and “Addio, del passato” from Giuseppe Verdi’s “La Traviata.”

The Saudi NOC has performed throughout the Kingdom and at festivals abroad, and the decision to bring the troupe to Paris was approved by Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan.

Speaking at the opening of the event, Sultan Al-Bazie, chairman of the Saudi Commission for Music, said: “The story began in Riyadh when the International Philharmonic Orchestra of Paris was invited to the Palais de la Culture in Riyadh to celebrate Europe Day, a cultural event organized in cooperation with the French Embassy and the Saudi Commission for Music under the Ministry of Culture of Saudi Arabia.”

He continued: “On this occasion, my friend and maestro, Amine Kouider, with his creativity, was able to interpret pieces of classical music with using oriental instruments and Saudi rhythms.

“On the instruction of His Highness (Prince Badr), it was decided to deepen this experience and to carry it out in Paris. You will, ladies and gentlemen, discover a musical experience composed of Saudi songs and music as well as great French composers interpreted with Saudi instruments and rhythms,” he added.

* This article originally appeared on Arab News en Français, click here to read it.


Myazu head chef Ian Pengelley talks World’s 50 Best award honor for best restaurant in Saudi Arabia 

Myazu head chef Ian Pengelley talks World’s 50 Best award honor for best restaurant in Saudi Arabia 
Updated 08 February 2023

Myazu head chef Ian Pengelley talks World’s 50 Best award honor for best restaurant in Saudi Arabia 

Myazu head chef Ian Pengelley talks World’s 50 Best award honor for best restaurant in Saudi Arabia 

DUBAI: In a ceremony held last week in Abu Dhabi, Japanese eatery Myazu was named the best restaurant in Saudi Arabia by the World’s 50 Best Restaurants MENA list.   

Winning the honor for the second time in a row, Myazu head chef Ian Pengelley – a household name in Asian fine dining – says he is “proud and honored” to have received the accolade.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by MYAZŪ SAUDI (@myazusaudi)

Known for its authentic Japanese food made using traditional techniques but with modern flair, Myazu first set up shop in Riyadh in December 2020, before opening up outlets in Jeddah and AlUla.  

“Obviously, there’s a lot of hard work involved in running a restaurant and when in the kitchen, your product must be consistent. And one of the things that we do well is we create the best team ever and the right environment for everybody to perform and create. And, again, more hard work,” said Pengelley when asked about the key ingredient to Myazu’s success in an interview with Arab News.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by MYAZŪ SAUDI (@myazusaudi)

One of the things that Chef Pengelley likes to make sure he does before putting a menu together for a new restaurant is travel to the source, a guiding principle he used when designing Myazu’s menu in the UK and across other Asian markets. Moving to Saudi Arabia also posed an exciting challenge for Pengelley, who started out his career as a kitchen porter at the age of 16.  

“I have to be honest, it’s been very, very challenging, but also very, very exciting. A new region, undeveloped region in the restaurant scene. It's very challenging. But we've enjoyed it. And it's been great bringing people from all around the world and creating a fabulous team here,” said Pengelley.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by MYAZŪ SAUDI (@myazusaudi)

Myazu, set up under the Modern Food Company umbrella, is set to build on the success of its popularity, says Pengelley.   

“We have just opened up another room, which is a bit more intimate and dark, called Arts by Myazu. We've also just created a liquid nitrogen ice cream trolley. So, we have a trolley that wheels around the restaurant and we actually make the ice cream in liquid nitrogen in front of the guests. So we’re trying to be innovative, creative and original. And fun. Lots of fun.”  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by MYAZŪ SAUDI (@myazusaudi)

The Modern Food Company is also looking at exciting times ahead. “We have a new restaurant opening in in April called Robata, which is a Japanese robatayaki concept. Very sexy, very fun, very funky,” he said. 


1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez

1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez
Updated 07 February 2023

1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez

1309 Studios founder Ghada Al-Subaey talks Arab representation, dressing Georgina Rodriguez

DUBAI: Qatar-based ready-to-wear label 1309 Studios, founded by entrepreneur Ghada Al-Subaey, has been garnering the attention of international stars, including Argentinian model Georgina Rodriguez.

The star, who now lives in Saudi Arabia with her boyfriend Portuguese football player Cristiano Ronaldo, wore one of Al-Subaey’s abayas during the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Doha.

Al-Subaey told Arab News that one of her brand’s key goals was to modernize the traditional abaya and “make it accessible to every woman around the world.

“Having Georgina walk into a boutique and pick our abaya off the rack and wear it for such an important event means that we have managed to reach that goal in making the abaya versatile and wearable. She picked one of our signature abayas the palm sage green,” she said.

Rodriguez wore the design with a figure-hugging black dress, silver heels, and a white Chanel bag.

1309 Studios is grounded in a contemporary bohemian aesthetic. At the heart of the brand is a minimalist, feminine look that merges seasonal trends with traditional Qatari elements.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 1. (Supplied)

Clean silhouettes, bold colors, artful prints, and carefully considered details are hallmarks of the brand. The designer draws inspiration from art, nature, and global culture to create pieces with a contemporary edge.

“When I was a teenager, I found myself exploring fabrics and creating styles that weren’t available in Qatar at the time. I began designing kaftans for family and friends during college and that’s where it all started,” Al-Subaey added.

Before she launched her brand in 2015, she ran her small business from home and relied on word of mouth to increase the hype around her designs.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 2. (Supplied)

She said: “That was when I conceptualized and worked on launching my own brand. I saw that there was a gap, there was a need to create a community in Qatar where women can turn to take care of their emotional wellbeing and leave no stone unturned to make it into a reality.”

The brand name 1309 is a nod to Al-Subaey’s mother.

“13/09 is my mother’s birthday. The name is dedicated to my mother, as I got my fashion sense from her. I used to watch her stitch and cut when I was younger, I learned all about fabrics and stitching from my mother,” she added.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 3. (Supplied)

Al-Subaey’s designs, which are shipped worldwide and are available in stores in Saudi Arabia, Dubai, and Qatar, are tailored in Qatar. She uses sustainable, natural, and vegan fabrics, as well as biodegradable packaging.

She said: “We also recycle scrap fabric and turn it into furniture. We rely on human skills and avoid the use of machinery as much as possible.”

And her designs are not just sketches that she brings to life, she puts thought into the design process to understand how the pieces she is creating will emotionally affect the person wearing it.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 4. (Supplied)

“I want people to feel relaxed and most like themselves while wearing a 1309 piece of clothing. A lot of times when people are not comfortable in their clothes, they are not themselves.

“The idea behind the 1309 studio woman is to create a safe place for women. A place where women come together to empower and uplift each other professionally and otherwise; to develop a platform where women feel free to speak up and support and take a moment to heal from the daily challenges of life in today’s fast-paced technological world.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 5. (Supplied)

“The clothes they wear should not be a restraint. The fabrics, colors, and cuts that I choose make the girls feel fun and alive. It should feel like an outfit, rather than a covering for an outfit.

“The fabric we use at 1309 is meant to complement various body types and shapes,” she added.

Al-Subaey is working to grow her brand globally.

Drop 8, “Eternal Unfolding,” look 6. (Supplied)

She said: “I want to change this stigma around abayas. I want abayas to become as respected globally as kimonos and to see everyone around the world wearing them; not necessarily to cover the body, but instead as a fashion statement.

“I would love for my ideas and inspiration to create change. Whether it is about applying sustainable approaches in our work or utilizing environmentally friendly packaging, I want the brand to continue to make a positive impact toward the community.

“I would like to expand globally and represent the Arab world in a global fashion space,” she added.


Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  

Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  
Updated 07 February 2023

Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  

Model Ubah Hassan shows off a custom-made gown at New York event  

DUBAI: Somali Canadian model Ubah Hassan took to Instagram on Tuesday morning to show off her head-turning gown from an event that took place in New York.  

The TV star, who is set to star in season 14 of “The Real Housewives of New York,” posted a video of her form-fitting lilac dress with cut out detailing around the chest that she wore to the 15 Percent Pledge gala. The gown featured voluminous sleeves that were attached to a cape with a long train.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by UBAH (@ubah)

Her dress was custom made by Harbison Studio, which was founded by New York-based designer Chales Elliot Harbison. 

“Warning to my future wedding guests: We are having rice and beans on my wedding as the entire wedding budget will go into dress and the diamonds,” Hassan joked in the second of two  Instagram posts. 

“Here is me and my team manifesting to be in a Disney princess movie,” she added, referencing her fairy-tale gown.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by UBAH (@ubah)

“THANK YOU for having us at @15percentpledge gala. You guys are doing amazing work supporting black business, black designers (sic),” she captioned her first post.  

The 15 Percent Pledge is an American non-profit organization that encourages retailers to pledge at least 15 percent of their shelf-space to Black-owned businesses. The foundation conducts audits, shares its database of Black-owned businesses, and offers business development strategies to participating companies. 

Dutch Moroccan Egyptian model Imaan Hammam was also in attendance. She wore a black gown with a long train by Italian brand Maximilian and had her hair tied in hip-grazing braids.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Imaan Hammam (@imaanhammam)

“Thank you @aurorajames and the entire @15percentpledge team for such a well-curated event and for bringing everyone together for such a great cause,” she wrote on Instagram.  

The gala dinner was also attended by Ashley Graham, Lori Harvey, Ryan Destiny and more.  

To celebrate the achievements of Black entrepreneurs, the Fifteen Percent Pledge awarded three founders with grants. The first-place winner, beauty brand 54 Thrones, received the first-ever Achievement Award, a $200,000 grant presented by Shop with Google. The second runner-up, Sergio Hudson, received $35,000, and the third runner-up, Puzzles of Color, received $20,000.  

The winners all received a physical award created by designer Jameel Mohammed, founder and director of Khiry, the luxury brand best known for its afro-futurist jewelry. 


Bollywood comes to the UAE at Louvre Abu Dhabi exhibit 

Bollywood comes to the UAE at Louvre Abu Dhabi exhibit 
Updated 07 February 2023

Bollywood comes to the UAE at Louvre Abu Dhabi exhibit 

Bollywood comes to the UAE at Louvre Abu Dhabi exhibit 

ABU DHABI: Bollywood has come to the UAE as the Louvre Abu Dhabi unveiled its newest art exhibition, on the history of Indian cinema.  

Home to one of the world’s largest film industries, India reportedly releases more than 1,500 genre-varying movies in 20 languages per year.  

“Bollywood Superstars” features a wide selection of paintings, photographs, costumes, tapestries and photographic objects. (Supplied)

Running until June 4, “Bollywood Superstars” features a wide selection of paintings, photographs, costumes, tapestries and photographic objects. A significant number of the displayed items are on loan from the Musee du Quai Branly — Jacques Chirac in Paris, which specializes in indigenous art.  

Indian cinema was developed in the 20th century, but as the exhibition demonstrates, narration and moving images have been present long before the modern era. In a way, the nation’s vibrant visual culture, folk performing arts, shadow puppetry, ancient epics and mythologies — dating back to 2,000 years — led to the birth of Bollywood. Some of the displayed objects represent the celebration and revival of religious, cultural figures, and heroes.   

significant number of the displayed items are on loan from the Musee du Quai Branly — Jacques Chirac in Paris, which specializes in indigenous art. (Supplied)

In the early days, traveling story-tellers roamed around, narrating scenes of important epics. A showcased mid-20th century wooden altar, resembling a toy box, shows on its detailed panels painted characters and scenes from the battle-themed “Ramayana” epic. It almost looks like a contemporary film set, where movement, costume, and staging are in action. 

Other objects reveal deities, taking them out of their temples and closer to worshippers. There is a colorful wooden bioscope that projects with light images of a deity. “Like a music box, a hand crank slides images for viewers to see peering through small peepholes,” reads a label next to the device.  

India reportedly releases more than 1,500 genre-varying movies in 20 languages per year. (Supplied)

Movies arrived in India via the revolutionary French Lumiere brothers, who invented photographic equipment, in 1896. As the years advanced, filmmaking became a weapon against colonial rule, asserting identity. Modern pioneering directors, such as the late Dadasaheb Phalke (dubbed “the Father of Indian Cinema”), were inspired by their own literature and culture, manifesting in their creations.     

The exhibition ends with a presentation of popular Hindi cinema today, witnessing a boom from the 1970s onwards with luminaries Amitabh Bachchan, Shashi Kapoor, and Shah Rukh Khan on the rise. Whether in old or modern times, “Bollywood Superstars” is a reminder of a human need to tell stories. 


American multinational bank JPMorgan recommends Grand Egyptian Museum in its annual brochure

American multinational bank JPMorgan recommends Grand Egyptian Museum in its annual brochure
Updated 06 February 2023

American multinational bank JPMorgan recommends Grand Egyptian Museum in its annual brochure

American multinational bank JPMorgan recommends Grand Egyptian Museum in its annual brochure
  • The bank’s annual brochure lists suggested recreational, artistic, and cultural activities to enjoy during holidays
  • The brochure mentions that the museum of ancient Egyptian civilization will display the complete collection of the boy king Tutankhamun

CAIRO: JPMorgan Bank is directing its clients toward the Grand Egyptian Museum in its annual brochure.

The publication is distributed to the organization’s distinguished clients around the world.

It lists suggested recreational, artistic, and cultural activities to enjoy during holidays, while highlighting the most important attractions and places around the world.

This year’s brochure includes many locations, and among them is a picture of the soon-to-be-opened Grand Egyptian Museum, accompanied by some information about the attraction.

It says that the museum of ancient Egyptian civilization will display the complete collection of the boy king Tutankhamun.

Ahmed Issa, Egyptian minister of tourism and antiquities, appreciated the bank’s gesture in recommending the museum to its clients.

The museum’s opening is eagerly awaited and it will be considered one of the most important establishments of its kind in the world.

The minister said that its opening date will be decided as soon as possible, adding that kings, presidents, and senior officials from around the world will attend its inauguration.

Soha Ali, CEO of JPMorgan Bank in Egypt and North Africa, held a meeting with Issa recently, and thanked the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities for its cooperation, and for providing information on the museum, as well as photographs.

JPMorgan Bank, the largest in the US and one of the biggest in the world, issues its booklet on an annual basis.