West Bank settler violence spreads ahead of Israeli general election

Special West Bank settler violence spreads ahead of Israeli general election
Israeli soldiers stand by as Israeli settlers throw stones at Palestinians during clashes in the town of Huwara in the West Bank on October 13, 2022. (AFP)
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Updated 30 October 2022

West Bank settler violence spreads ahead of Israeli general election

West Bank settler violence spreads ahead of Israeli general election
  • Palestinian civilians, properties targeted during intensified attacks after Saturday’s killing of Hebron gunman
  • Fatah calls for strike in protest over violent incidents

RAMALLAH: Israeli settlers have reportedly intensified attacks on Palestinian civilians and properties throughout the West Bank in the run-up to Tuesday’s general election in Israel.

Sources said shots had been fired at the homes of Palestinians while others were pepper sprayed in an escalation of violence after an Israeli security officer was killed and three people wounded in a shooting incident on Saturday near to an Israeli army checkpoint in Wadi Al-Gross, close to the settlement of Kiryat Arba.

The Israeli army said that its forces were carrying out a search for the assailants. Israeli sources alleged that Mohammed Kamel Al-Jabari, 35, from the southern West Bank city of Hebron, had opened fire on a group of settlers in Kiryat Arba. He was later killed in an exchange of fire with Israelis.

Following the shooting, the Israeli army closed entrances to Hebron and dozens of settlers attacked Palestinian vehicles and blocked access to Al-Fawwar refugee camp, south of Hebron.

On Saturday night, groups of settlers were reported to have shot at Palestinian properties between the Wadi Al-Hussein and Jaber neighbourhoods.

In a recording, activist Manal Dana said: “The settlers are shooting toward the houses, and I am afraid for my children. The settlers are standing under my house.

Palestinian sources in Hebron said armed settlers, protected by the Israeli army, sprayed civilians with pepper gas in the Al-Sahla neighborhood near the Ibrahimi Mosque.

The Fatah movement in the central Hebron region announced a strike on Sunday in mourning for Al-Jabari. 

Hisham Sharbati, a human rights activist from Hebron, told Arab News that on Saturday night settlers had closed all intersections of Hebron and that the Israeli army had kept them shut for part of Sunday morning.

In a statement, Fatah said: “Our struggle is continuing, and the convoys of martyrs are advancing the national situation in defense of our land.”

The organization pointed out the need to protect “our honor and our sanctities in response to the fierce and systematic attack led by occupation authorities against our people in all the governorates of the country.

“We ask you to adhere to the strike in honor of all the martyrs, the wounded and the prisoners, and our hero martyr Mohammed Kamel Al-Jabari.”

Several people were said to have been injured on Saturday evening after being attacked by settlers in Al-Sahla.

The Palestinian Red Crescent reported that its ambulance crew came under fire from Israeli troops and that a paramedic suffered a bullet wound to his shoulder. He was transferred to Al-Ahly Hospital.

Falah Issam Kahla, from Ramon, was hospitalized after being attacked east of Ramallah on Saturday evening, dozens of settlers reportedly gathered on Jericho Road, near Ramallah, and threw stones at Palestinian cars, and vehicles were similarly damaged on the outskirts of Hawara town, south of Nablus.

In other incidents, Palestinian vehicles were targeted near to the villages of Ras Karkar and Deir Ammar, west of Ramallah, while groups of settlers gathered near the Beit El and Halamish settlements northwest of Ramallah.


Iran ex-president, former PM call for political change

Iran ex-president, former PM call for political change
Updated 36 min 59 sec ago

Iran ex-president, former PM call for political change

Iran ex-president, former PM call for political change
  • Khatami hopes the use of ‘non-violent civil methods’ can ‘force the governing system to change its approach and accept reforms’

TEHRAN: Iran’s former president Mohammad Khatami and former premier Mir Hossein Mousavi have both called for political changes amid the protests triggered by the death in custody of Mahsa Amini.
As the 44th anniversary of the 1979 Islamic Revolution approaches, one of the country’s main opposition figures, Mousavi, called on Saturday for the “fundamental transformation” of a political system he said was facing a crisis of legitimacy.
And on Sunday Khatami, the leader of the reformist movement, in a statement said: “What is evident today is widespread discontent.”
Khatami said he hoped that the use of “non-violent civil methods” can “force the governing system to change its approach and accept reforms.”
In a statement carried by local media, Mousavi said: “Iran and Iranians need and are ready for a fundamental transformation whose outline is drawn by the pure ‘Woman, Life, Freedom’ movement.”
He was referring to the main slogan chanted in demonstrations sparked by the death on September 16 of Amini, a 22-year-old Iranian Kurd.
She had been arrested three days earlier by the morality police in Tehran for an alleged breach of the Islamic republic’s dress code for women.
Mousavi, 80, said the protest movement began in the context of “interdependent crises” and proposed holding a “free and healthy referendum on the need to change or draft a new constitution.”
He called the current system’s structure “unsustainable.”
An unsuccessful presidential candidate in 2009, Mousavi alleged large-scale fraud in favor of populist incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, leading to mass protests.
He has been under house arrest without charge in Tehran for 12 years, along with his wife Zahra Rahnavard.
A close confidant of the Islamic republic’s founder Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, Mousavi was prime minister from 1981 to 1989.
“People have the right to make fundamental revisions in order to overcome crises and pave the way for freedom, justice, democracy and development,” Mousavi said in his statement.
“The refusal to take the smallest step toward realizing the rights of citizens as defined in the constitution... has discouraged the community from carrying out reforms.”
Khatami, 79, made similar remarks, warning that “there is no sign of the ruling system’s desire for reform and avoiding the mistakes of the past and present.”
President from 1997 to 2005 before being forced into silence, Khatami said he regretted that Iran’s population was “disappointed with Reformism as well as with the ruling system.”


Countdown on to World Government Summit 2023 in Dubai

Countdown on to World Government Summit 2023 in Dubai
Updated 05 February 2023

Countdown on to World Government Summit 2023 in Dubai

Countdown on to World Government Summit 2023 in Dubai
  • State leaders, heads of UN, IMF, WHO among participants
  • Event, themed ‘Shaping Future Governments,’ runs from Feb. 13-15

DUBAI: Twenty state leaders, more than 250 government ministers and the heads of some of the world’s most important organizations will take part in the 2023 World Government Summit, which opens in Dubai later this month.

Under the heading of “Shaping Future Governments,” the event will encompass six main themes: accelerating development and governance, the future of societies and healthcare, exploring frontiers, governing economic resilience and connectivity, global city design and sustainability, and prioritizing learning and work, Emirates News Agency reported.

UAE Minister of Cabinet Affairs Mohammad bin Abdullah Al-Gergawi said the participants would include the presidents of Egypt, Turkiye, Senegal, Paraguay and Azerbaijan, as well as about 10,000 government officials, thought leaders and global experts.

The summit, which runs from Feb. 13-15, will also feature 22 international forums on topics such as climate and industry technology, food system transformation, global health, government services, women in government and government media, the report said.

Leaders from the World Economic Forum, International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organization, World Health Organization, Arab League and the Gulf Cooperation Council will also take part in the sessions.

The secretary-general of the United Nations and president of the World Bank will deliver speeches.

Other key figures include representatives of Bridgewater Associates, Guggenheim Partners, Rakuten and Siemens Energy, and Nobel Prize-winning scientists Esther Duflo and Dr. Roger Kornberg.

About 80 bilateral agreements are expected to be signed during the conference.

 


Turkiye says no concrete evidence of threat to foreigners after Daesh suspects detained

Turkiye says no concrete evidence of threat to foreigners after Daesh suspects detained
Updated 38 min 25 sec ago

Turkiye says no concrete evidence of threat to foreigners after Daesh suspects detained

Turkiye says no concrete evidence of threat to foreigners after Daesh suspects detained
  • Several Western states warned of a heightened risk of attacks to diplomatic missions in Turkiye

ISTANBUL: Turkish police said they had not found evidence of any concrete threat to foreigners after detaining 15 Daesh suspects accused of targeting consulates and non-Muslim houses of worship, state media reported on Sunday.
Last week, several European consulates in Istanbul were shut citing “security reasons” and several Western states warned citizens of a heightened risk of attacks to diplomatic missions and non-Muslim places of worship in Turkiye, following a series of far-right Qur'an-burning protests in Europe in recent weeks.
State-run Anadolu Agency cited an Istanbul police statement saying the 15 suspects had “received instructions for acts targeting consulates of Sweden and the Netherlands, as well as Christian and Jewish places of worship.”
While the suspects’ ties to the extremist group were confirmed, no concrete threats toward foreigners were found, the statement said.
Ankara summoned nine ambassadors to criticize the coordinated closure of the European consulates and Turkish officials later said the Western nations had not shared information to back up their claims of a security threat.
Turkiye suspended negotiations for Sweden and Finland’s NATO accession following a protest in Stockholm during which a copy of the Muslim holy book, the Qur'an, was burned.
Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu repeated on Saturday Turkiye’s frustration with what it says is Sweden’s inaction toward entities Ankara accuses of terrorist activity.
Turkiye, Sweden and Finland signed an agreement in June last year aimed at overcoming Ankara’s objections to their NATO bids, with the Nordic states pledging to take a harder line primarily against local members of the banned Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK).


There is no ‘silver bullet to defeat extremism,’ says Whispered in Gaza creator Joseph Braude on Hamas oppression of enclave’s civilians

There is no ‘silver bullet to defeat extremism,’ says Whispered in Gaza creator Joseph Braude on Hamas oppression of enclave’s civilians
Updated 55 min 57 sec ago

There is no ‘silver bullet to defeat extremism,’ says Whispered in Gaza creator Joseph Braude on Hamas oppression of enclave’s civilians

There is no ‘silver bullet to defeat extremism,’ says Whispered in Gaza creator Joseph Braude on Hamas oppression of enclave’s civilians
  • Iran’s obsession with dominance both at home and in the region endangers many globally, says Braude
  • Braude spoke with “Frankly Speaking” following the release of a series of stories from the Gaza Strip

LONDON: As Hamas maintains a tight communication blockade across the Gaza Strip, people under the authoritarian rule of the Iran-sponsored militia feel desperate for a platform to share their ordeal. 

“There have been a lot of attempts by Gazans on their own, acting with great courage, to contact the outside world through social media and so on, that have come to nothing because Hamas suppresses them. So, we wanted to find a creative way to build a platform for them. And we found a way to do it using technology and animation and so on,” Joseph Braude, president of the US-based Center for Peace Communications, said on Arab News’ “Frankly Speaking.” 

In January, CPC released a number of accounts describing life in Gaza under Hamas rule. The 25-story series, entitled “Whispered in Gaza,” was published on multiple media outlets in at least five languages — Arabic, English, French, Farsi and Spanish.

Members of the Hamas security forces show their skills in a drill held during a graduation ceremony in Gaza City on October 31, 2022. (AFP)

Appearing on the flagship current affairs talk show, Braude said: “The nature of the incidents that are being described is very widespread in Gaza. The stories of flight by sea, the stories of racketeering and the shaking down of small-time merchants by Hamas, and so on.

“So, these are widespread phenomena and what you are seeing, including the opinions that are being described, are wholly in line with the findings of all of those polls and journalists and human rights investigators that do their work.”

The diverse accounts detail the various oppression and repression techniques employed by Hamas to stifle anyone who challenges the status quo, raising concerns about going on record or speaking with foreign media and organizations. 

“Some of the speakers, by their own accounts, as you see in the video, previously were jailed by Hamas for doing exactly what they were doing when they spoke to us: trying to tell their stories to the outside world,” Braude told “Frankly Speaking” host Katie Jensen. 

Joseph Braude, president of the US-based Center for Peace Communications (CPC), appears on Arab News’ “Frankly Speaking” talk show. (Screenshot)

He added: “We committed to them that we would not show their faces and that we would technologically alter their voices so that there would be a measure of anonymity provided to them. 

“So, on the one hand, the stories are being told without their faces shown, which they might have done in the past. On the other hand, they are reaching a much larger audience because the tragedy of this communications blockade by Hamas is that they’ve been successful in taking down content that Gazans attempt to put up.

“But here, we have built a substantial distribution channel on four continents, and the material is everywhere. It proliferates and it is impossible to take it down, even though Hamas has tried.”  

CPC shared a tweet on Jan. 24 stating that days after the series’ launch, “it was swarmed by pro-Hamas accounts” attacking the project. In the Twitter thread, CPC wrote that a user accused one of the Gazan speakers “of being an intelligence officer.”

Supporters of the Palestinian Hamas movement demonstrate in Jabalia in the northern Gaza Strip on October 21, 2022, against Israel. (AFP)

Braude said that this Twitter attack “shows that Hamas doesn’t want these voices to be heard,” accusing the movement of “attempting to globalize” their “repression of free expression” and “suppress global free expression.” 

He highlighted that the real danger, which affects many beyond Gaza’s borders, is posed by Iran and its proxies, including Hamas. 

Hamas has been supported by the Iranian regime since the 1990s, when 418 leading Hamas figures were deported to Lebanon by Israel and started cooperating with the Iran-backed Hezbollah, according to the Washington Institute. 

“Everybody is in danger from these groups,” Braude said. “They are persecuted and the first victims are the people who live under their rule.

A Palestinian youth collects plastic and iron from a landfill in Beit Lahia in the northern Gaza Strip, on January 17, 2022. (AFP)

“I don’t even really know how to describe a situation that is so broad,” he continued, underlining that many people are “endangered” by “Iran’s attempts to maintain its dominance both of its own country and of large portions of the region.”

Braude added: “That is why you are seeing it in Iran, (and) you are seeing it in Gaza now: People want something different. They want a better future. They want security as well and stability.” 

With over 80 percent of people in the coastal strip living below the poverty line and 64 percent currently food insecure, as per figures from the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, an increasing number of Gazans drown at sea fleeing the conflict-ridden territory in the quest for better lives.

Meanwhile, high-profile Hamas leaders lead luxurious lives abroad and retreat to ritzy hotels in Beirut and Istanbul, where they also own profitable real estate businesses, AFP reported last month. 

Arab News’ “Frankly Speaking” talk show host Katie Jenson. (Screenshot)

Concurring that the lavish lifestyle Hamas leaders enjoy has stirred resentment among Gazans, Braude pointed out that Hamas’ growing image problem due to economic disparities has emerged in several of the recorded testimonies. 

“While the majority of Gazans are denied access to the aid and support that comes in from multiple sources in the world, the Hamas leadership and their families and the small circle of elites that surround them are living in the lap of luxury,” he said. 

“So, yeah, it’s not bad to live in Gaza if you are a stalwart of Hamas, particularly at the leadership level.” 

Emphasizing the importance of the world joining forces to put an end to these injustices, Braude said he hoped the 25 testimonies would start “a new conversation” by introducing policymakers and world leaders to “a new way of thinking about the realities, more and greater understanding of what people want in Gaza, how people feel about those who control their Strip.” 

He argued that such creative endeavors have the potential to empower many Gazans, eventually and hopefully enabling “the educational conditions to improve (and) information to travel more freely.”

Braude urged the world “not to wait until the ongoing military stalemate is resolved” and to instead “find answers now, to find steps that can be taken now” and harness “the tools that the 21st century has brought to the world,” as he sees “no end in sight” to the current dire situation in Gaza. 

“And so, we hope we’re starting a new conversation,” he said. 

However, Israeli forces have been for decades committing systematic human rights violations against Palestinians, including minors, according to Amnesty International, which pointed out on June 17, 2022, that “some 170 Palestinians currently imprisoned were arrested when they were children.”

Amnesty International also condemned Israel for the killing of Palestinian-American journalist Shireen Abu Akleh on May 11, 2022. 

Asked if he condemned Israel’s human rights violations, Braude responded: “There are quite a few people in this series who say, forthrightly, that they were in favor of the first and the second intifadas, but fault Hamas for going on to start wars with Israel that it could not win and then hide in bunkers and leave civilians to suffer the casualties.” 

Citing one of the testimonies by a man who refused to let Hamas dictate how he resists the Israeli occupation, Braude said: “Hamas — by launching wars, provoking reactions that cause civilian casualties but…do not advance the Palestinian cause — is forcing people to go by its playbook.” 

He also said he believed it was possible to ignite real action by starting a conversation, stressing that “nonviolent expression is ultimately the most powerful tool that humanity has in order to advance justice, peace and the well-being of all peoples.” 

Nevertheless, Braude pointed out that there were “no immediate solutions for the tragedy that is being portrayed here, and we are under no illusions about that.

“We are not suggesting that there is any sort of a silver bullet to defeat extremism, to end stale forms of thinking and so on,” he continued. “I think that at most we achieve a ripple effect that, as I’ve said, affects the vocabulary of the discussion, that stimulates new forms of creative thinking by multiple parties and elements within, without and so on.” 

Braude told “Frankly Speaking” that “Whispered in Gaza” was “only the beginning of an ongoing project.” 

He said: “Whenever we launch an initiative … we take time and we look at what it achieved. We try to draw lessons and to innovate, always to build on successes and learn from whatever lessons emerged. So that is what we are looking at right now. And, of course, we are going to do more.”


Russia’s Lavrov visits Baghdad to discuss bilateral relations, energy cooperation: Iraqi statement

Russia’s Lavrov visits Baghdad to discuss bilateral relations, energy cooperation: Iraqi statement
Updated 05 February 2023

Russia’s Lavrov visits Baghdad to discuss bilateral relations, energy cooperation: Iraqi statement

Russia’s Lavrov visits Baghdad to discuss bilateral relations, energy cooperation: Iraqi statement
  • Visit will focus on encouraging investment opportunities between two countries, particularly energy sector

BAGHDAD: Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov will arrive in Baghdad on Sunday to discuss boosting bilateral relations and energy cooperation, Iraqi Foreign Ministry spokesman said in a statement.
Lavrov, who is leading a delegation that includes oil and gas companies’ representatives, is scheduled to meet his Iraqi counterpart Fuad Hussein on Monday, Ahmed Al-Sahhaf said in a statement.
Sahhaf said the visit will focus on “strategic relations with Russia and to encourage investment opportunities, especially in relating to energy sectors.”
The Russian foreign minister will also meet on Monday Iraqi top officials, including Prime Minister Mohammed Al-Sudani, President Abdul Latif Rashid and parliament speaker, Sahhaf said.