Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say

Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say
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Abjad Al-Nafel, a researcher in new mediaو a television presenter. (Supplied)
Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say
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Ahmed Addayhani, Correspondent at Monte Carlo International Radio. (Supplied)
Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say
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Moath Otoom, CEO of the QAAFE Center for Media and Political Studies. (Supplied)
Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say
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Media professionals in the media center, which was equipped with modern technical tools for the Arab Radio and Television Festival, which opened on Wednesday (November 9) in Riyadh and lasts for 4 days. (Supplied/SBA)
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Updated 12 November 2022

Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say

Arab media must adapt to changing technology and demands, experts say
  • Traditional media tools remain important in terms of credibility and reliability
  • The digital field is “a fertile ground for rumors and unknown sources”

RIYADH: Technological developments are behind rapid growth and changing demands in the Arab media industry, Abdullah Al-Humaidani, deputy director of digital media at the Saudi Broadcasting Authority, told Arab News.
His comments came during the 22nd session of the Arab Radio and Television Festival, held in Riyadh from Nov. 9-12.
Al-Humaidani added that digitization efforts by specialized media institutions in radio and television in the region are critical to the success of the industry.
“It is best to focus on interaction and increasing views on the digital platforms of channels and radios to attract the advertising bodies, more than the traditional marketing efforts to advertise on the traditional screen or radio,” he said.
He added that traditional media tools remain important in terms of credibility and reliability, as the digital field is “a fertile ground for rumors and unknown sources.”
The deputy director said that the television and radio industry must adapt to new communicative behaviors among audiences.
“The reality of the Arab media faces great challenges related to the thinking style of media leaders, the importance of switching platforms and the manufacture of creative material close to the audience,” he added.
“The institutions in charge must humanize the media material, approach people’s interests, produce diverse content and use archiving to produce a distinctive industry.”
Al-Humaidani said that the Arab Radio and Television Festival was an opportunity to review modern media technologies, exchange experiences and present pioneering ideas in the field of audiovisual media.
“The media industry has changed. We must focus on narrative content, publishing attractive visual language and marketing in digital platforms. We must notice that opinion trends and TV news indicators have begun to be taken through social media platforms and sites. So stagnation and lack of development will lead the media bodies to find themselves out of the competition,” he warned.
The festival featured “the launch of many initiatives and partnerships aimed at strengthening the Arab production industry in line with various developments, and drawing clear features for the future of professional standards for the media map in the region.”
Abjad Al-Nafel, a television presenter and researcher in new media, stressed the importance of developing radio and television in Arab societies, pointing at the same time to the importance of “employing the new media in the service of the old media, and not the other way around.”
He added that major technological transformations have occurred during the past two decades, “especially that the recipient has options to choose himself, unlike what was previously the case when the channel or radio determined the content that was broadcasting the material according to its media agenda.”
Al-Nafel said that it was important for radio and television to play a role in the development of peoples by “providing educational and targeted materials, although their impact is not the same as before.”
Ahmed Addayhani, correspondent at Montecarlo Al-Doualiya, said that radio, television and traditional media channels have “lost their public attention” in following events, news and even entertainment content. However, he added that they “remain the most reliable among the audience, especially with regard to following up on events and pursuing true news.”
Moath Otoom, CEO of the Qaafe Center for Media Studies and Political Science, said that digital developments have affected the economies of media institutions, especially in publishing, production and marketing.
This has contributed to changing the patterns and habits of consumers by providing a variety of content that meets their needs and desires, he added.
Otoom said: “Television and radio have great economic importance, offset in importance by the cultural, entertainment and news value that works on the development of peoples.
“The Arab media movement several years ago reflects the bright image on which it is based, and evidence of this is the participation of major Arab and Western media institutions in the Arab Radio and Television Festival currently, which enriches the media environments in the region in particular.”


Saudi king, crown prince direct operation of air bridge after Turkiye quake

Saudi king, crown prince direct operation of air bridge after Turkiye quake
Updated 13 sec ago

Saudi king, crown prince direct operation of air bridge after Turkiye quake

Saudi king, crown prince direct operation of air bridge after Turkiye quake

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on Tuesday directed the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center to operate an air bridge to help earthquake victims in Syria and Turkey.

Developing


Saudi ambassador to Yemen meets UN envoy

Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Yemen Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber meets with UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg. (SPA)
Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Yemen Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber meets with UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg. (SPA)
Updated 07 February 2023

Saudi ambassador to Yemen meets UN envoy

Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Yemen Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber meets with UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg. (SPA)
  • The two officials reviewed the Kingdom’s political, economic, developmental, and relief efforts to support the Yemeni government and people

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Yemen Mohammed bin Saeed Al-Jaber met with the UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg in Riyadh on Tuesday.

The two officials reviewed the Kingdom’s political, economic, developmental, and relief efforts to support the Yemeni government and people.

They also discussed ways to strengthen and support UN efforts to reach a comprehensive political solution to end Yemen’s crisis and support its security, stability, and development.

Grundberg said he also met with the new Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council Jasem Al-Budaiwi and senior Saudi officials to discuss ways to expand economic and humanitarian measures, and to progress toward a national ceasefire and an inclusive Yemeni-owned political process under UN auspices.


Saudi crown prince discusses bilateral relations with Italy PM during call

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Italy’s Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni. (File/SPA/AFP)
Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Italy’s Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni. (File/SPA/AFP)
Updated 07 February 2023

Saudi crown prince discusses bilateral relations with Italy PM during call

Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Italy’s Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni. (File/SPA/AFP)

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman discussed bilateral relations with Italian premier Giorgia Meloni during a telephone call on Tuesday.

Prince Mohammed and Meloni also discussed opportunities for joint cooperation and ways to develop them in a number of fields.


Saudi Cabinet expresses solidarity with quake hit Turkiye and Syria

Saudi Cabinet expresses solidarity with quake hit Turkiye and Syria
Updated 07 February 2023

Saudi Cabinet expresses solidarity with quake hit Turkiye and Syria

Saudi Cabinet expresses solidarity with quake hit Turkiye and Syria

RIYADH: The Saudi cabinet voiced its solidarity with Turkiye and Syria following the devastating earthquakes that ripped through the border area  between the two countries killing thousands and injuring thousands more.

The statement was made during Tuesday’s weekly Saudi Cabinet meeting, chaired by King Salman, as the death toll exceeded 5,000, with tens of thousands more injured.

But international agencies like the WHO said the casualty number would grow significantly to thousands more.

The Cabinet statement published via the state news agency SPA said “the Kingdom expressed its solidarity” with the countries impacted by the earthquakes.

The first quake – of a magnitude 7.8 - struck the border area between Turkiye and Syria at about 4a.m. local time on Monday causing buildings to topple to the ground, their occupants caught unaware as they slept.

The second – 7.7 magnitude - quake struck the same area shortly before 2p.m. local time as search and rescue workers dug frantically through the rubble to find survivors.

There were two further earthquakes of a magnitude 5.6 and 5.7 on Tuesday morning as well as 312 aftershocks since the first quake struck.

The Cabinet also praised the bilateral ties between the Kingdom and Iraq and reiterated the Kingdom’s support for efforts made by the Iraqi government to achieve sustainable growth and prosperity for its people.

It also reviewed reports on regional and international conferences recently held in Saudi Arabia to keep pace with the rapid developments and contribute to finding solutions to global challenges.


KSRelief Masam project clears 675 mines in Yemen

KSRelief Masam project clears 675 mines in Yemen
Updated 07 February 2023

KSRelief Masam project clears 675 mines in Yemen

KSRelief Masam project clears 675 mines in Yemen

DUBAI: Nearly 675 mines planted by the Houthi militia in Yemen have been dismantled in the Fifth week of 2023 by King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief)’s Masam project.
The mine-clearing team removed a total of 384,980 mines planted by the militia across Yemen since Masam project started, Saudi Press Agency reported on Tuesday.

Overseen by the KSRelief, special teams destroyed hundreds of anti-personnel and anti-tank mines, unexploded ordinances and other explosive devices.

The KSRelief project, also known as Masam, is one of several initiatives undertaken by Saudi Arabia on the orders of King Salman to help the Yemeni people.

More than 1.2 million mines have been planted by the Houthi militia, claiming the lives of hundreds of civilians.

The Saudi project trains local demining engineers and provides them with modern equipment. It also provides support to Yemenis injured by the devices.