Google Doodle celebrates female Emirati poet Ousha Al Suwaidi

Google Doodle celebrates female Emirati poet Ousha Al Suwaidi
Abu Dhabi-based guest artist Reem Al Mazrouei illustrated the Doodle of Emirati poet Ousha Al Suwaidi. (Google)
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Updated 28 November 2022

Google Doodle celebrates female Emirati poet Ousha Al Suwaidi

Google Doodle celebrates female Emirati poet Ousha Al Suwaidi

DUBAI: Google Doodle celebrated on Monday Emirati poet Ousha Al Suwaidi, who inspired female poets across the region, with an illustration featuring her in traditional attire, including a face covering. 

Nicknamed ‘Fatat Al Khaleej’ (The Girl of the Gulf), Al Suwaidi was known for writing Nabati poems, or traditional poetry originating within the nomadic Bedouins of the Arabian Peninsula. 

Al Suwaidi was born on Jan. 1, 1920 in Al Ain. When she was 15, she rose to fame nationally in what was commonly a male-dominated field of literature.

Many of her poems were inspired by the Arabian Gulf and desert landscapes, as well as her own experiences in the UAE, touching on themes such as love, wisdom, patriotism, and nostalgia.

She is regarded as one of the finest Arabic Nabati poets with many of her poems sung by popular Emirati and Arab artists.

On this day in 2011, a prestigious event recognized her contributions to literature and many of Al Suwaidi’s poetry and poems written in her honor were recited at the venue.  

The poetry community in the UAE also established an annual award for female Emirati poets in Ousha Al Suwaidi’s name in 2011. A library at the Emirates International School, and a section of the Women's Museum in Dubai, was also dedicated in her honor, according to a website citing her biography.  

Al Suwaidi died in 2018, she was 98.


ChatGPT maker fields tool for spotting AI-written text

ChatGPT maker fields tool for spotting AI-written text
Updated 12 sec ago

ChatGPT maker fields tool for spotting AI-written text

ChatGPT maker fields tool for spotting AI-written text
  • But the company said the detection tool is still "imperfect"
SAN FRANCISCO: Creators of a ChatGPT bot causing a stir for its ability to mimic human writing on Tuesday released a tool designed to detect when written works are authored by artificial intelligence.
The announcement came amid intense debate at schools and universities in the United States and around the world over concerns that the software can be used to assist students with assignments and help them cheat during exams.
US-based OpenAI said in a blog post Tuesday that its detection tool has been trained “to distinguish between text written by a human and text written by AIs from a variety of providers.”
The bot from OpenAI, which recently received a massive cash injection from Microsoft, responds to simple prompts with reams of text inspired by data gathered on the Internet.
OpenAI cautioned that its tool can make mistakes, particularly with texts containing fewer than 1,000 characters.
“While it is impossible to reliably detect all AI-written text, we believe good classifiers can inform mitigations for false claims that AI-generated text was written by a human,” OpenAI said in the post.
“For example, running automated misinformation campaigns, using AI tools for academic dishonesty, and positioning an AI chatbot as a human.”
A top French university last week forbade students from using ChatGPT to complete assignments, in the first such ban at a college in the country.
The decision came shortly after word that ChatGPT had passed exams at a US law school after writing essays on topics ranging from constitutional law to taxation.
ChatGPT still makes factual mistakes, but education facilities have rushed to ban the AI tool.
“We recognize that identifying AI-written text has been an important point of discussion among educators, and equally important is recognizing the limits and impacts of AI generated text classifiers in the classroom,” OpenAI said in the post.
“We are engaging with educators in the US to learn what they are seeing in their classrooms and to discuss ChatGPT’s capabilities and limitations.”
Officials in New York and other jurisdictions have forbidden its use in schools.
A group of Australian universities have said they would change exam formats to banish AI tools and regard them as cheating.
OpenAI said it recommends using the classifier only with English text as it performs worse in other languages.

Tech giants in Europe could pay for 5G, fiber networks under fresh EU plans

Tech giants in Europe could pay for 5G, fiber networks under fresh EU plans
Updated 31 January 2023

Tech giants in Europe could pay for 5G, fiber networks under fresh EU plans

Tech giants in Europe could pay for 5G, fiber networks under fresh EU plans
  • Proposal aims to offset costs of data-heavy companies including Google, Netflix
  • But ‘fair share’ vision could threaten net neutrality, civil society groups warn

LONDON: ‘Data-heavy’ tech companies in Europe recording high levels of internet data traffic could be required to contribute to telecom infrastructure costs under new EU plans, sources said on Monday.

Under the proposal, companies including Netflix and Google will be required “to help pay for the next generation of internet infrastructure” across the continent.

The initiative to charge companies over their bandwidth usage — data transfer measured in bits per second — is part of the “fair share” vision being pursued by the EU.

“Fair share,” also known as the sender-pays principle, is based on the argument advanced by leading European telecom carriers that online platforms fail to contribute to network expenses while benefiting from the digital economy.

A draft document suggested that tech firms might contribute to a fund to offset the costs of building 5G mobile networks and fiber infrastructure, as well as take part in the creation of a mandatory system of direct payments to telecom operators.

The European Commission, which is developing the proposal with industry players, is reportedly floating a “threshold” proposal that would help identify companies that generate large amounts of data traffic, similar to the concept of “gatekeeper” companies introduced as part of the Digital Markets Act.

According to a European Telecommunications Network Operators’ Association study, a small number of internet companies — including Google, Apple, Meta, Microsoft and Netflix — account for more than 56 percent of global data traffic.

The proposal to force tech giants to contribute to telecom costs was first brought forward in May 2022 but was met with skepticism by some members of the EC, who called for broad consultations with relevant stakeholders.

Tech companies and civil society organizations have also expressed alarm about the move, warning that it might jeopardize net neutrality, which promotes the democratization of the internet and freedom for individual users.

EC President Ursula von der Leyen said in December that the EU “intends to launch a thorough discussion on the future of Europe’s connectivity infrastructure,” adding: “The amount of data exchanged and harvested is larger than ever and will increase.”

EU lawmakers are aiming to move ahead of the curve with legislation focusing on the growth of the data-intensive metaverse and virtual worlds.


SRMG Academy launches registration for journalism boot camp

SRMG Academy launches registration for journalism boot camp
Updated 29 min 46 sec ago

SRMG Academy launches registration for journalism boot camp

SRMG Academy launches registration for journalism boot camp
  • Classes start on April 30 in Riyadh and run for six months
  • The program features lectures by a group of SRMG journalists

RIYADH: SRMG Academy has announced that registration for its signature journalism boot camp is now open until Feb. 18, 2023.

The six-month program, which kicks off in Riyadh on April 30, seeks to discover new media talents and develop emerging journalists in Saudi Arabia and beyond.

The SRMG Academy Boot Camp offers 20 participants hands-on classroom training and the opportunity for work experience at SRMG’s most prominent publications.

The rigorous program is led by world-class Arab and international journalists who have experience in regional and global news organizations. It will also feature lectures by a selection of SRMG’s leading journalists.

“I can’t think of a better gateway to begin a career in journalism in Saudi Arabia and the Arab world than taking part in this unique program,” said SRMG Academy Managing Director Alaa Shahine Salha.

“Each day, the training will offer new challenges to the participants,” he added. “They will be presented with real-life situations that are faced by journalists and the students will have to make quick decisions…about how to address them.”

The first edition of the program is open to residents of Saudi Arabia who are recent university graduates or have a maximum of two years of work experience.

The best-performing trainees will receive job offers from SRMG publications. The selection will be based on a combination of talent and the needs of the business.

Launched in December last year, the SRMG Academy is the editorial training arm of the Saudi Research and Media Group, which owns more than 30 leading publications and platforms across the Middle East and North Africa region, including Asharq Al-Awsat newspaper, Asharq News and Independent Arabia.

The SRMG Academy Boot Camp is designed to offer participants a gateway to building a career in the industry by equipping them with the skills needed in today’s media world. The course will include fundamental skills, such as writing, editing and beat reporting, in addition to different story formats, such as mobile journalism, podcasting and broadcast journalism.


Advisory firm Salient launches in Saudi Arabia

Advisory firm Salient launches in Saudi Arabia
Updated 31 min ago

Advisory firm Salient launches in Saudi Arabia

Advisory firm Salient launches in Saudi Arabia
  • Industry veterans behind company hail Kingdom’s ‘leading role on global stage’

LONDON: Newly formed communications advisory firm Salient has launched in Saudi Arabia.

The company was launched by industry veterans Andrew Bone and Sean Trainor. Salient specializes in corporate reputation and organizational culture management.

“Saudi Arabia is the most exciting market globally for communications professionals,” said Abdullah Al-Muzaini, co-founder and non-executive chairman.

“Salient is committed to building local capacity to enhance the reputation of leading organizations and increasing familiarity and favorability toward the Kingdom.”

Headquartered in Riyadh, Salient combines global expertise and local insights to build the reputations of organizations in the region.

The two veterans behind Salient said that the company will provide communication expertise to corporates operating across a wide range of industries, and will support organizations in the country as the Kingdom continues to implement its far-reaching Vision 2030 national transformation program.

“Guided by Vision 2030, the pace of change is accelerating every day as Saudi Arabia takes a leading role on the global stage,” Trainor said.

“The communication challenges and opportunities are unprecedented, and Salient is committed and well positioned to support the country in this dynamic marketplace.”

Bone said that Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 is an ambitious project “the likes of which has never been witnessed before worldwide.”

He added: “Collectively we have been working at the center of government in Saudi Arabia for more than a decade helping the nation to tell its compelling story.”

The company aims to support a new generation of Saudi industry leaders by blending global talent and local professionalism, the pair said.

“Our fresh, innovative approach to communication is the perfect learning environment for nurturing Saudi talent to become global communication consultants,” Salient general manager Osamah Alqusayer said.

“Blending the best of global talent with smart, inquisitive young Saudis is an attractive proposition for organizations looking for standout communications with impact.”


Russian court fines Amazon’s Twitch $57,000 over Ukraine content

Russian court fines Amazon’s Twitch $57,000 over Ukraine content
Updated 31 January 2023

Russian court fines Amazon’s Twitch $57,000 over Ukraine content

Russian court fines Amazon’s Twitch $57,000 over Ukraine content
  • Court said Twitch failed to remove “fakes” from its platform

LONDON: A Russian court on Tuesday fined streaming service Twitch 4 million roubles ($57,000) for failing to remove what it said were “fakes” about Russia’s military campaign in Ukraine, the Interfax news agency reported.
Twitch, which is owned by Amazon, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Moscow has long objected to foreign tech platforms’ distribution of content that falls foul of its restrictions, with Russian courts regularly imposing penalties.